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Found 37 results

  1. Permian Reptile Vertebra ID

    Hi, looking for some thoughts on identification of a fossil I bought a while ago. This is a fairly well preserved vertebra from an early reptile of some kind. Unfortunately I lost the original label for it so all I can say is that it’s from 300-250 mya, and from a formation in Oklahoma or Texas. I’m not very experienced with Permian stuff, so I’m not sure where to begin. Thanks for any help!
  2. Came across this in my morning twitter readings and my jaw dropped. Did you know that the name 'Bathygnathus' currently has priority over the name 'Dimetrodon' until an opinion on the reversal of precedence is published by International Commision on Zoological Nomenclature ( iczn.org/node/40573). The application is currently in front of ICZN and research is underway to support the proper taxonomic identity of specimens. From what I read its a very slow process but expected to support Dimetrodon. Anyway about all I know so if anyone would like to add to this please do. http://iczn.org/node/40573 The purpose of this application, under Article 23.9.3 of the Code, is to conserve the widely used generic name Dimetrodon Cope, 1878 (SPHENACODONTOIDEA, SPHENACODONTIDAE). The name Dimetrodon is threatened by its senior subjective synonym Bathygnathus Leidy, 1853. The name Dimetrodon has become widely accepted and is in prevailing usage. It is proposed that Dimetrodon be given precedence over Bathygnathus whenever these names are considered to be synonyms.
  3. Hi! I recently acquired a few new additions to my permian collection, but there are a few pieces of which I am not a 100 % whether they are ID'd correctly, simply because I am not yet knowlegdeable about the material. So I thought it might be a good idea to post the ones I am doubtfull about here, as I know there are a lot of people more knowlegdeable than me who probably could ID them. The first item is a small claw listed as "juvenile dimetrodon limbatus" from the Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA I was a bit doubtfull when they said "juvenile" dimetrodon claw, but I got it anyway because it's a very nice permian claw which was an okay price regardless the ID. The second item is a caudal vertebra that was listed as "Edaphosaurus" (from the Archer City Formation, Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA) which came as a set along with a piece of sail spine which without doubt belongs to Edaphosaurus. The last items were sold as a collection of "Eryops megacephalus" fossils from the Wellington garbar complex, Waurika, Okhlahoma. From left to right are a piece of skull plate, a toe bone, a piece of dermal armor and a tooth.
  4. Dimetrodon footprints found on P.E.I. bring Island to 'world stage' of paleontology https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/pei-fossil-footprints-discovered-cavendish-park-1.5027811 Laura Macneil discovered the footprints on this rock in Cavendish in May. (Isabella Zavarise/CBC)
  5. Ok I also think it is time for us to see more of the members collections . So without further ado show us your Sphenacodontidae collection . is an extinct family of small to large, advanced, carnivorous, Late Pennsylvanian to middle Permian pelycosaurs. Sphenacodontid fossils are so far known only from North America and Europe and have one of the most ironic creature ever to have lived in there ranks, Dimetrodon. And a claw from the same location.
  6. I can't find any pictures that focus on Edaphosaurus claws, and I can't zoom in enough on pictures to get a clear visual of any claws, so I can't see any differences between Dimetrodon and Edaphosaurus claws are. They're both really small compared to the bodies, so it's hard to see from full body/skeleton pictures, and they wouldn't be from enough angles to be sure. Someone who has dealt with lots of them, including on articulated specimens, has said that they're almost the same, and as far as he knows, but isn't 100% sure about it, the biggest difference, the only one he is aware of, is that Dimetrodon claws are curved on the bottom, like raptor/general theropod claws, while Edaphosaurus claws, equally sharp, are mostly flat on the bottom, like spino toe claws. Is that the case? Does anyone happen to know?
  7. Dimetrodon sail spine pieces

    From the album Permian era fossils

    Very small fragments of dimetrodons sail spines. From the lower Permian Texas Red Beds, Archer city formation in Archer county
  8. I’m definitely no expert on Dimetrodon or Triassic fossils, but Dimetrodon was one of my favorite critters as a kid and still think they’re pretty cool as a big kid. I found a nice claw that’s advertised as Dimetrodon and wanted to make sure it’s actually from that animal. The seller says this claw was found in Northern Texas in the Texas Red Beds formation. It’s 5/8” long. What do you folks think?
  9. Listing for dimetrodon manus track from el pueblo, NM. Five claw tip impressions but these are the only pics provided. Any thoughts?
  10. From the album Permian era fossils

    Reverse side of the unidentified Edaphosaurus pogonias bone with an apparent Dimetrodon tooth hole.
  11. Hey everyone, this is for anything Sphenacodont--dimetrodon, or otherwise. Collections/pictures/discussions/whatever. This is the splinter thread off of the sphenacodont collections thread, so if anyone would like to bring over anything from the other thread, please feel free. I'm going to bring over some interesting posted info that covered different topics, and with links to interesting and useful info. *some discussions covering other things and animals in relation to sphenacodonts is perfectly fine. For instance, spinosaurus, Permian topics, apex predators, or whatever. As long as it has some relation. Side-tracking is fine, just bring it back home before too long, please. Here's a link to the previous thread. It would be greatly appreciated if you post pictures of any dimetrodon/sphenacodont fossil material you have:)
  12. Dimetrodon tiny teeth

    What is the deal with dimetrodon teeth??? I see them for sale regularly, but they're always MICRO! I even see some still teeny tiny labeled as "large" and "huge"? Even the super rare and expensive ones I've only ever seen a few of, are still less than an inch. Same with claws. I KNOW they have much bigger teeth, and claws, so why are practically dust particle size teeth&claws the only ones found? I know there's many dimetrodon species, but most of them are decent size. At LEAST big enough that even large juveniles should have notably larger parts. Ive never read anything that said that babies/newborns are almost all that's ever found. In fact(this just crossed my mind as im typing) I see sail sections regularly, that all clearly come from adult sized animals. I don't think Ive ever even SEEN small or baby sized sail fragments that come from animals anywhere near as small as all the teeth Ive ever seen. those smaller teeth in these pics may look small in those giant heads, and many pics make them appear smaller cause it's from a side view and the jaw obstructs the lower part of the back teeth from the side. The super rare and expensive teeth Ive seen only a few times ever, were comparable to the smallest teeth in those pictures. And the average size teeth and claws I see are literally fractions of a centimeter. The bottom picture is the average claw size that I see all the time--those dishes are 1.25"!!!!!! in fact, teeth and claws are in those vials of micro-fossils from sifted site debris. whats going on with my 'metros???
  13. Hi all, I’m about to purchase this nice set of Dimetrodon vertebrae from the Texas Red Beds. Just wondering if they are in fact Dimetrodon verts? Thank you! Jojo
  14. Dimetrodon maxilla

    Heres a really wonderfully scary maxilla from a Dimetrodon grandis from a few days ago. Maxillary fang is killer... This one is nicknamed Annie. She's an isolated specimen. This is one maxillae of 6 were working on, the rest in the field currently.
  15. Dimetrodon fang

    Hi everyone- quick post of a massive Dimetrodon post canine. The root is attached which is really nice. Have a large ddon skull nearby with an empty socket that this may go to. size is 3 inches. Still have a little bit of matrix to remove.
  16. Dimetrodon axis vertebra

    Hey everyone, here is a really gorgeous axis vertebra from a Dimetrodon. The ultra wide neural spine holds incredible neck muscles.
  17. Dimetrodon skull bones

    hi everyone heres another fun bone. this one is the prefrontal bone of the upper skull.
  18. Dimetrodon humerus

    Hey gang heres another beautiful specimen from this week- wonderful sub adult ddon humerus. Really great bone to show the incredible musculature these guys had on their limbs. very strong animals. Planning on attempting to finish up plastering a block tomorro that contains 3 ddon maxillae and 2 lower jaws, all of which appear to be separate individuals of varied age. cheers chris. and JP i promise not to bleed on any bones tomorro.
  19. Dimetrodon Skull bones

    Hey gang here is this afternoons find- a really nice premaxilla from a big ddon. The premaxillary canine is equisite. This is the snout of a dimetrodon. cheers chris
  20. Big Dimetrodon Fang

    Hi everyone, got out this afternoon to work the site and found a beautiful large Dimetrodon maxillary fang, shed. Wonderful preservation. This would have come from a hefty size ddon.
  21. Dimetrodon neural spine

    Hi gang, got out today and spent some time in the bone bed and found some wonderful material including this nice young Dimetrodon fin spine. The day was topped by two left ddon maxillae with very nice chompers- different species as well.
  22. Dimetrodon clavicle

    Got out to the site this morning for a few hours and found this really beautiful young Ddon clavicle. Magnificent preservation and pre prepped by the wonderfully dense clays. One of my guys found another clavicle twice as large. will post some more site photos soon. cheers chris
  23. Dimetrodon tooth

    hi gang, just needed to take advantage of the cool front... 90 instead of 100. plus the rains always produce some nice washout material. Had to hike in a mile because of the muddy roads. This is a beautiful shed maxillary fang from a good size ddon. We were lucky enough to find both parts of the tooth within a meter of each other. Good day.
  24. We've got Bonnie, the Dimetrodon almost uncovered! Here is a recent TV news story about her! Channel 3 Wichita Falls News Story on Bonnie the Dimetrodon
  25. 290-Million-Year-Old Fossil Now in Seymour Museum By: Samaria Terry, June 30, 2017 http://www.texomashomepage.com/news/local-news/290-million-year-old-fossil-now-in-seymour-museum/755137806 The Whiteside Museum of Natural History (July 28, National Dimetrodon Day) http://www.whitesidemuseum.org Yours, Paul H.
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