Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'dolphin'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 41 results

  1. Hi everyone! I recently acquired some dolphin & shark teeth, but they weren't ID'd so I was wondering if some of you might be able to help me out if possible. The first are a set of small dolphin teeth found in Hoevenen, Antwerp in Belgium (Miocene, 15 - 10 mya) And I was wondering if they could be ID'd to down to genus? I've read Eurhinodelphis is a common find and that there are quite a few more named and unnamed species to be found there. The other fossils that I hoped to be ID'd are 5 tiny shark teeth from Oosterzele (Lede formation), Belgium (Eocenen, Lutetian, approx. 44 million years old) I've searched this website as they has a database with I believe all the species found there, but I am not confident and skilled enough to ID them properly. http://users.skynet.be/belgiansharkteeth/Lede formation/Oosterzele set.html My best guesses are that the first 3 teeth belong to the same species and the most common at Oosterzele, which are worn down Otodus auriculatus teeth. As for the other teeth I don't really know, so I really would appreciate some help and input. Thanks in advance!
  2. Larger Dolphin Tooth

    As many know, I have hunted the Peace River Florida for over a decade. I love finding whale teeth and have been fortunate in finding them. I also like dolphin teeth, but the ones I find range from tiny (half inch) to small (1.25 inch). Today I found my largest dolphin tooth at 1.6 inches. It is broken but I really like it. Interestingly , it is hollow from the break to the root. So, what do we know or can surmise about the dolphin that had this tooth? Kentriodontid ? For me, this tooth at this size is really rare in the Peace River.
  3. Hi all I purchased this cetacean skull fragment from a person who collected it in South Carolina many, many years ago. She said that she found it specifically in the ACE basin (Ashepoo, Combahee, Edisto Basin) while diving. I want to see if anyone can help me identify the species. I figure it's a cetacean skull, likely from an odontocete (?sperm whale or relative), and possibly consists of the premaxillary bones (with the large fossa for the melon) and others. I've included a number of photos. It measures 16 in long, 8 in wide, and 7 in tall and weighs over 13 lbs. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  4. Hop 5 03/30/19

    1. Hemipristis serra: One of my first teeth of the day, found in the water. Small, but nice colors and perfect serrations. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Flawless sand tiger. Symmetrical and super sharp, with both double cusplets intact. 3. Galeocerdo aduncus: Gorgeous tiger, almost looks like a G. cuvier because of size. Very nice root to crown contrast. 4. Odontocete tooth: Little porpoise/dolphin tooth with a long, thick root. In very good condition. 5. Ecphora sp.: A very nice small Ecphora, nearly complete, just missing the white part at the top. Rare to find more than a fragment of these at Brownies. Cast your votes! The poll will end in three days, on April 4th at 3:00 p. m. EST. Hoppe hunting!
  5. Last week I was on holiday in the Netherlands/Belgium for a short time and I had the chance to visit the area of Antwerp to find some shark teeth. Too bad the weather wasnt good (I think it rained the entire day). Nevertheless I found some teeth and I have to say that I am kinda satisfed with the result! I almost sieved the whole day so my body still hurts a bit The material I searched in comes from the Miocene, Pliocene and was washed up from the extension of Churchill dock in Antwerp. Here are two "in-situ" pictures: A nice tooth on the sifter: Pictures of the nicest teeth: A nice dolphin tooth with enamel (4 cm long): A dolphin ear bone: (a little bit more than 2 cm long) An Isurus retroflexus tooth (3 cm long): And an 4.2 cm long Cosmopolitodus hastalis: (I am not sure if I determined this one right ...) I think I will post some more detailed pictures of other teeth in the next days! Thanks for watching
  6. Mini Miocene Marine Mammal

    I found this a few days ago along the Virginia side of the Potomac River along a miocene cliff. It's mostly if not all Choptank formation. Any ideas about a genus? Grid is in inches. Looks like maybe mature dolphin tailbone, but it's so small???
  7. After tallying all the votes on the Hop 5 of my trip report, the "Hoppe Tripmaker" for Bayfront Park 01/04/19 is.......... #3 Odontocete Tooth Odontocetes are toothed whales, including dolphins and porpoises. Fossilized teeth from these creatures can be found in Miocene sediments such as the Calvert Cliffs, where this particular specimen was discovered. They seem to be relatively uncommon, especially when compared with abundant fossils like shark teeth or shells. My collection only contains about 15 of these teeth in total, and this one is perhaps the prettiest and most well preserved of them all. It's a gorgeous tooth, most likely from a small dolphin, and certainly deserving of the title of Tripmaker. The best find of each trip is not always the biggest! This little tooth beat a large Mako and complete cookie (which tied for second place, by the way). Below is a picture of the Tripmaker under my brand new magnifying glass. I hope you all enjoy the new Hop 5 voting concept. Thank you to all who participated!
  8. Sharktooth Hill Marine Mammal Fossils

    I recently found a small lot of mammal teeth from Sharktooth Hill. I am doing an education program about marine mammal evolution and they looked like cetacean teeth so I bought them. I am new to fossil forum but not new to collecting marine mammal fossils. I know that you can not get a species ID from cetacean teeth but I am hoping I can get a little additional information or perhaps a suspect so to speak. I believe that the first 3 pictures are of an unidentifed Odontoceti, maybe a Kentriodon of some sort. The first two teeth were both right around 1.5 cm. The third tooth was a little over 1 inch. I am fairly certain the 4th picture is of the unidentified Odontoceti species that is mistakenly called Prosqualodon errabundas by some collectors and dealers. I think it was the Coastal Paleontologist blog that said this was an undescribed species of large dolphin. It is about 1.75 inches long and has a very inflated root. The last picture looks more like an Allodesmus than a cetacean to me but I could be wrong. If anybody has an thought or opinion, I would greatly appreciate any information.
  9. Unusual Miocene Odontocete Tooth

    Hi, This tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is Calvert Formation (~18-22 MYA). It is clearly from an odontocete, but it is unlike any other I've found from this location, or anywhere for that matter. The crown is not perfectly conical, instead having a rather wide appearance. But what really makes this tooth so odd is the root. It is flattened and bumpy, while most odontocete teeth have long, smooth roots like those of human teeth (this obviously makes sense, as they are both mammals). The fossil is about 3/4" from the tip of the crown to the bottom of the root. If you look closely (it may be difficult to see in the pictures provided), it almost looks like the tooth is encased within the root, and could be pulled out. This at first led me to consider the possibility that the strange flat part may actually just be matrix and the fossil is just a typical odontocete tooth not fully uncovered. However, after further inspection I am confident that everything is fossilized and the entire fossil is a single tooth. So now the only questions are what animal did this tooth belong to and why is it so unusual in appearance? I am certainly hoping that it may be a small Squalodon tooth because I've never found one and I think they're just awesome. Any information is appreciated, as always. Thank you!
  10. My friend found a couple of interesting bone pieces while digging at Ernst Quarries last weekend. In the same hole, she found what may be two small cetacean periotic bones, as well as a small dolphin tooth. All three are included included in associated images. She wasn't digging a particularly large hole, so I can't help but wonder if they are all from the same animal. While there may be no way to tell, the possibility is intriguing to this newbie's mind. Of course, I may even be wrong about my ID of the bones. Any input regarding the donor species, etc., is greatly appreciated. Cheers.
  11. Tooth (?) from Zeeland

    Hi all, When I saw this specimen on the beach of Banjaard (in Zeeland, Netherlands), I picked it up thinking it was just a small piece of bone with a weird shape. But now that I've been looking at it more closely I am almost completely convinced that it is in fact a worn out tooth from some kind of mammal (perhaps dolphin or seal?). There are some small bits of enamel left on the (thinner; right side on the first photos) tip of the tooth. The Banjaard beach has mostly Pleistocene stuff, but older things can wash up occasionally (the same day I found a Pliocene and an Eocene shell, so there's a real mix of stuff). So this tooth has a possible age of pretty much the whole Neogene. I tried to capture the enamel bits on camera but it's pretty difficult. This is my best attempt, hopefully it is good enough to see the separation between normal bone and enamel. Do you guys think it is possible to say anything more about this little fossil? Thanks in advance, Max
  12. Fossil ID help - Savannah

    Found this vertebra its about 3 inches long. I'm thinking maybe dolphin? If anyone has any idea what it belonged to? Thanks!
  13. Dolphin/Whale Periotic Bone

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Choptank Formation Virginia Miocene Photographed exactly as found, with brilliant, polished surface when dry! Collected on private property with permission.
  14. @Boesse While cleaning shells from the Pliocene deposits at Capitola I came across this dolphin tooth ~17 mm. Any ideas on a more specific identification? Thanks Mike
  15. Matoaka beach, Choptank FM, Lower Miocene Before I start out, may I just say Matoaka is a beach not known for its shark teeth. Most fossil hunters go there for invertebrates, Which are incredibly abundant. Shark teeth are usually small, a bit worn, and take lots of work to find. The old saying (that I just invented) goes “If you want a chance at a meg, go to brownies. If you want lots of sharks teeth, go to Purse. If you want a snail, go to Matoaka. If you want to be told you can’t walk under a cliff go to Calvert Cliffs state park” I decided that I was going to walk as far as I felt I could and still get back with daylight. For the first stretch I found literally nothing of interest and the nagging fear that I was going home empty handed kicked in. I had set my mind to “Ecphora mode,” because sharks teeth were not gonna be found. The tide was lower than last time, so I got to have a good look at a new slide that looked really promising. I was right, it was littered with Ecphora. Unfortunately, almost none were extractable or worth the extraction. This one was a real heart breaker, big for me but sliced in half and in really loose clay.
  16. Hi! I’m new on here and not super familiar with fossils. However, today I was walking on the beach in Hatteras Village, Hatteras Island, North Carolina (a part of the Outerbanks). I stumbled upon what appears to be an old bone of some sort. For the life of me, I can’t figure out what type of bone it is/which animal it is from. Any ideas?? The photo is posted below. For some reason, the other photos won’t upload, so I will try to upload them in the replies hopefully.
  17. Hi all, can anyone tell if this is a dolphin tooth, and what species it is? It's a gift from @JBMugu It comes from Sharktooth Hill of Bakerfield, California. Round Mountain Silt Member of the Temblor Formation. It measures 1.7 inches long. Could it be Kentriodon?
  18. Hi all! The Mace Brown Museum of Natural History will have a table in the community center this saturday at the Aurora Fossil Festival. I'm currently trying to write up the marine mammal assemblage from Belgrade Quarry, which appears to be transitional between the upper Oligocene Chandler Bridge Formation here in Charleston and the late early Miocene assemblage from the Pungo River Formation in the Lee Creek Mine. Bring your Belgrade marine mammal specimens to our table, I'd like to see them! Several members of this group and the exceedingly generous North Carolina Fossil Club have already donated a bunch of great specimens including earbones and teeth. Also, I just realized I accidentally left @sixgill pete off of this flyer - thanks to him as well!
  19. Small Marine Mammal ?

    A hunting friend asked me to ID a tooth he recently found: I think it is dolphin or porpoise, but not positive, so I'll resurrect an old TFF thread as background and provide a couple of photos.. Here is the recent find. It is a tad over 1 inch. Sometimes I mis_identify as gator. This is not gator based on root termination.
  20. Its name sounds like a tongue twister http://www.newsweek.com/prehistoric-dolphin-skull-discovered-ecuador-mysterious-species-lived-25-754668?piano_t=1
  21. Well I was looking at Marcos cool post about coprolites and was scrounging thru some of my Manatee Cnty boxed material and didnt find any coprolites so here's several potential whale/dolphin type frags that I'm not entirely sure about and was wondering if any of you all can confirm. I'm thinking A is a root of a maybe a dolphin tooth, B is a bulla of some sort , C is a fragment of some type of fish jaw--seems like I've seen this somewhere before? D and E appear to be anterior processes/ of dolphin periotics. I added a closeup of the end view of A and a closeup of C. I also found this little guy which is fairly well preserved and has some very distinct symmetry...seems to be a tilly of some sort. Thanks for any help. Regards, Chris
  22. It kinda looks like an ear bone?

    Found this today, something struck me as odd so I stuck it in my pocket. It’s from the peace river. I’m looking at it, and it kinda looks like an ear bone from a dolphin or manatee, but I don’t know...it’s something, just can’t wrap my head around it. Any ideas?
  23. Another day in the sunshine

    It was about 95 degrees today, but the breeze was constant and I was standing (up to my chest) in cool running water. That's about as good as it gets. Not a lot of finds, because I was limited (due to water depth) to the top foot of gravel. Found a dolphin tooth, and a penny. Thanks to @Harry Pristis for the picture and ID. for the picture and ID. And then this Broken shark tooth. I am always thinking Meg when I hunt. It might be GW. It is approximately 15 mm on each side. Either way, a great day with a few interesting finds to keep me coming back.
  24. New here to the forum and to fossil hunting. Found a few teeth over the past few weeks was hoping to get some help with identification and where to find more in the low country. Living in mount pleasant with access to a 23 foot bay boat as well as a few paddle boards. Would love to meet some great people with the same interests as myself and my wife. We would love to host some new friends on our boat for some hunting. If you are in the area and wouldn't mind the company of some newbs that are eager to learn and hunt send me a PM. We are looking forward to becoming knowledgeable on the area and meeting others that share our interests. I have attached a picture of a few of the things we found any help on ID would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
×