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Found 445 results

  1. Can anyone help I'd this partial gastropod? Found it in the pliocene Yorktown Formation. It appears to have been pretty big in life. Thanks!
  2. Stumbled on this site and remembered I had an account that I haven't used for a while. Five years later, I thought I'd post an update. Shark Tooth Island is located in Wilmington, NC, just off the shore from River Road Park. If you're standing at the boat ramp facing the river, the island directly in front of you is Keg Island. At low tide, the upriver side of the island can have some specimens to collect, but I never had as good of luck on Keg Island as I did on Shark Tooth Island. The smaller island directly upriver from Keg Island is Shark Tooth Island. When I first joined this site it was suggested that sifting would be the best bet for finding teeth on the island, as it's pretty picked over. The first few times I went out I sifted, but I learned quickly that I would actually have much better luck both in size and number of teeth per hour if I just did surface collecting. Two main issues limit surface collecting. The first is rather obvious: the tide. At high tide there is pretty much no bank to collect on. From my experience, the Campbell Island Tide Chart is the most accurate to rely on for Shark Tooth Island. I found that getting on the island about 1.5 hours before low tide peaked was most effective. Plenty of surface to collect on, and it will be growing for an hour and a half. Also, if you're walking right on the edge of the water, don't forget to look in the water. I found several that were still underwater. The second main issue that limits surface collecting is the kayak tour groups. PaddleNC I think? They would take a dozen or so people to the island and if they got there before you, you're not going to have much luck that day. Unfortunately I don't remember what days/times they would normally do the tours there else I'd let you all know. One thing to keep on your mind when you're out there, if a cargo ship or other large vessel passes by, you're going to want to make sure your kayaks are pulled WAY up before the water returns. If you left your boats only a few feet out of the water and a big vessel goes by, there's a good chance that your kayaks will be floating down the river when you're ready to leave. Anyways, here are the vast majority of my finds from the four years I lived in Wilmington. The only fossil pictured that wasn't found on Shark Tooth Island or Keg Island is the largest tooth. That I found while trying to avoid stepping on anything sharp while walking barefoot on Masonboro Island.
  3. Hi everyone, Last year I went on a one day fossil hunting trip to the Champagne region in France with a fossil hunting buddy of mine. We went to the well known locality of Fleury-la-Riviere, where Lutetian (Eocene) rocks are outcropping on the hillsides above the vineyards. We had a really good day, with lots of cool finds, among others a small but very nice Campanile giganteum. It was a lot of work to extract this gastropod in one piece, but it worked out nicely.
  4. Gastropod- Clathospira?

    As with my other posts so far, I should preface this post by saying that the Paleozoic, marine ecosystems, and invertebrates are not generally my primary expertise, so I apologize if I am wildly off base or asking stupid questions. Sadly, I did not find this specimen myself, and so I do not have any particularly useful information on age or location. It was left in a desk drawer along with a collection of other invertebrate fossils, most (if not all) of which are Paleozoic in age. Based on some web-surfing, I came up with a possible identification of Clathospira that is probably completely wrong. Here are the pictures. Thank you in advance for your time and input.
  5. Fairly large gastropod

    I found this one ages ago when i was a kid. I didn't even realize it was a fossil until i picked it up years later and saw that the "dirt" on the inside was solid rock with small shell pieces. Seems relatively recent if anything. Don't know exactly where it came from.
  6. Maclurina manitobensis.jpg

    From the album Northern's inverts

  7. Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Is this a Straparollous? Holopea pyrene? Left some slightly blurry photos in to show cm size. The part in question is about .4 cm deep by 1.5 cm wide. There is also what might be a bivalve to the right of it, and maybe, chain coral. Dunno about what is shown on reverse. Looking for potential ID on all and anything else someone might see. Wondering if I should give this a toilet bowl cleaner (diluted) bath? The “snail” appears to be a quartz replacement. I did initial cleaning in Biz detergent for about 24 hours, repeatedly and several days in Oxyclean. Brushed after each soak with polyester bristle brush. Did not want to destroy the crystals above specimens, so avoided wire brush. Please let me know what you think. I also want to be sure I am using correct tags here. Since my land contains Ordovician onward period, should I just list Ordovician as the period? Also, how many tags are appropriate? Should they just be location found and potential period, or should they contain generic terms such as snail? If anyone else here is using an IPhone SE for photos and knows some ways to set it, I would be appreciative. I have been unable to figure out how to change the settings for photographing specimens. The camera has a mind of it’s own, and focuses on whatever it wants, even though I am doing everything that my provider told me to do to change the settings for macro. She said phone is capable of it, but required my digging into the depths, which I did. When I transfer photos from phone to computer they come up at 72 DPI. I am using Photoshop elements to change resolution and size, which usually causes photos to be blurry. Upon transfer, I have photos that are about 40 Meg. Once I adjust the size, they are down to less than 2 Meg. Then adjust focus and color cast to be as realistic as possible. I have figured out the best time of day for taking photos with my portable photo tent, LED light and natural light through patio doors. Also made a stable phone holder to help prevent blurry photos. Thinking there has to be an easier way, as each photo I post takes about 5-10 minutes total. Sorry, obsessive compulsive newbie here, lol. Thanks for looking and any comments appreciated. If my ID is off, no problem. top 3 3-16-4 3-16-3 3-16-2 3-16-2 3-16-1 3-16-8 3-16-9 3-16-10 3-16-12 3-26-6 shell side1 Fernwood Acres, on Flickr side 2 snail 1c Thank you.
  8. Hello all, I am trying to identify various fossils from the Cretaceous Glen Rose Formation around Spring Branch, Texas. Could anyone verify my identifications... The first is gastropod molds which I assumed to be either a Turritella or Cerithium species. The second I named Nerinea texana. The third is an ornamented urchin indicative of the Glen Rose formation called Salenia texana. Finally the curly fossils I am unsure if those are gastropods? And the final fossil is a clam of sorts with polychaete worms growing on it. Any idea what this clam may be?
  9. Good looking gastropod needs id

    Hello from Cyprus, this one I found near the old limestone quarry in moni area, again the heavy rain , when the mud sliding settled, it exposed a piece of it. 3m under the usual surface It is quite big and very well preserved. In the same wall I found also another kind of gastropod, corals, 4 kinds of bivalves. I will post on other threads soon. That wall consisted of beige/white earth and grey hardened sand like parts, still needed metal needle tool to scrap it off, of some specimens. Also most specimens are whiter that what I am used to find. Which i think it could be fossils, yet younger ones, like 80-100k years old?
  10. Big gastropod

    Hello plz share your thoughts on this one It is a gift from a friend, who doesn't remember where exactly he found it, however he thinks it was Akamas Peninsula in Cyprus.
  11. Jellyfish?

    Unfortunately I don’t have much useful detail to share with you here. I found this in Illinois at the bottom of a bridge filled with slabs of rock blasted from God-knows-what quarry. It other slabs like it contained fragments of brachiopod shells and calymene trilobites. It is about 4 1/2cm in diameter. My best guess was a jellyfish or something similar; a geologist whom I showed it to agreed, but honestly neither of us were at all confident in our assessment. Thoughts?
  12. Hello there! I received a very nice birthday gift from my rock-loving colleague - a big gastropod shell from Manzanilla de Cuba! I'm not sure if it's a fossil or recent shell, but it's pretty heavy (306.72 grams, to be exact), and I was hoping to get some answers as to its identify from you, my forum friends. Please see pictures below: Thanks for your help! Monica I think @MikeR is a shell specialist... And I know that @Max-fossils is a fan of shells, too...
  13. What is this?

    I've only recently developed an interest in fossils and have been out hunting them for the past 6 months. I appreciate the feedback. When I found this, I kept looking at it with a magnifying glass trying to figure out if it had a Home and Hearth stamp on the bottom. But the bottom has small fossils in it.
  14. Some shells of the Paris Basin

    Some photos of my fossils, it comes from the Middle Lutetian Yvelines Bassin Parisien - France 1 - Pyrasus angulatus 59mm 2 - Typhis tubifer 38mm 3- Cryptocunus calophorus 62mm 4 - Olivella parnensis 35mm
  15. Got two interesting ones

    So I've had these two pieces for ages, but I know nothing about them. The first one is a gastropod but I can't figure out what made that crack in the shell? The second one seems like a piece of bone because its porous but I'm not sure.
  16. ID please

    Hi my friend gave me this last year as a joke. He noticed a picture of some small Gastropods form Florida I got from @Nimravis (maybe you may know about this Ralph ) and said he had a nice little one I could have if I had the room . I said yes please . He sent it in a massive box 24inches by 12inches . When I opened it , I found a Huge Pilocene Gastropod from California . If anybody can help with an ID I would be very grateful . thanks Bobby
  17. Conch shell from Florida

    Hi all, From Cris & Kyle, along with a few other awesome seashells, I got these two great conch shells. They were found somewhere in Putnam County, Florida, and are likely from the Nashua Formation (early Pleistocene). They seem to be part of the conch shells, the Strombidae family. But I really don’t know what species. Anyone know what it could be? Thanks in advance, Max
  18. Seashell from Florida

    Hi all, This great little Gastropod was given to me by Cris & Kyle from Fossil Voyages. They found it somewhere in Putnam County, Florida. They said it was likely from the Nashua Formation, which is early Pleistocene. So I’m trying to put a species name on it, but I can’t even find the family! If you could help with ID in any way (even pointing out the family that you think it might be part of would help; of course going straight to genus or species is better) I’d be more than glad to hear your thoughts! Thanks in advance! Max
  19. Florida Olive shell

    Hi all, So I got this gorgeous olive shell as a gift from Cris & Kyle from Fossil Voyages, as they knew I was a big fan of fossil seashells. Unfortunately they don’t remember where exactly they found it, but they know it was in Putnam County, Florida. They also said that it was likely from the Nashua Formation (which is early Pleistocene). So I looked around on neogeneatlas.org , but not a single shell from the Olividae family seemed to come from this formation. I then checked fossilworks.org , and found some results, but googling for pictures to compare the species with was quite disappointing. In Neogene Atlas, the two genera that seemed to match the best (this is just based on the pictures, not on any data) were Oliva and Americoliva. In Fossilworks, the only database (from 5 results searching “Nashua Formation” to contain fossils from the Olividae family is: PaleoDB 79748 , with fossils from Rucks Pit Mbr of the Nashua Fm, has the following Olividae species: Oliva (Porphyria) paraporphyria, Oliva (Strephona) rucksorum, Oliva (Strephona) roseae. I would really like to put a species name on this beautiful seashell, it’s my first fossil from the Olividae family, a family that also has incredible modern representatives (yes, I like the olive shells A LOT ). Anyways I am looking forward to your feedback as to what species this fossil is! Thanks in advance, Max
  20. A friend of many years showed me fossils he had found on the beach in Estonia on the Bay of Finland. He asked me what they were. I had never seen anything like it from my area. I told him I would post it for him to see if anyone could ID it. I have no idea what Formation it is from, but it’s coming from the ocean. He said they’re all over the beach. Here is a group of them he collected on the beach. I’m mostly interested in the long fossils. I don’t have closer pics for the others. Side 1 Sude 2 End shot Thanks for any thoughts you may have.
  21. Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Tylostomatidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Stromboidea, the true conchs and their allies. Genera within the family Tylostomatidae include: Tylostoma, the type genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha (Infraorder) Family: †Tylostomatidae Genus: †Tylostoma Species: †tumidum
  22. Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tylostoma tumidum Gastropod cast SITE LOCATION: Mills County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Tylostomatidae is an extinct family of fossil sea snails, marine gastropod molluscs in the superfamily Stromboidea, the true conchs and their allies. Genera within the family Tylostomatidae include: Tylostoma, the type genus. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Littorinimorpha (Infraorder) Family: †Tylostomatidae Genus: †Tylostoma Species: †tumidum
  23. Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Phragmolites is an extinct genus of molluscs in the family Bucaniidae, paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position possibly being either Gastropods or Monoplacophorans in the superfamily Bellerophontoidea. The family lived from the Lower Ordovician to the Devonian and have shells in which the apertural margins tend to flare. Most genera have a slit and selenizone, others some modification of this feature. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Bellerophontida Family: †Bucaniidae Genus: †Phragmolites Species: †fimbriata
  24. Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phragmolites fimbriata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Decorah, Iowa, USA TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Period (445-485 Million Years ago) Data: Phragmolites is an extinct genus of molluscs in the family Bucaniidae, paleozoic molluscs of uncertain position possibly being either Gastropods or Monoplacophorans in the superfamily Bellerophontoidea. The family lived from the Lower Ordovician to the Devonian and have shells in which the apertural margins tend to flare. Most genera have a slit and selenizone, others some modification of this feature. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Bellerophontida Family: †Bucaniidae Genus: †Phragmolites Species: †fimbriata
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