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Found 55 results

  1. Horn Coral

    From the album Ohio Fossils

  2. My wife and I have been exploring our local Mississippian Warsaw formation. These are some of our less common finds from the Warsaw Formation on the Meramac River from the last two weekends. Meloechinus maltiporus Echinoid - Warsaw Formation- Mississippian Age Horn Coral - Warsaw Formation- Mississippian Age
  3. Recently a hill of dirt and rock has been pushed in front of the drive to keep water and washed out materials from gushing down the driveway and into the street. This was the first time in at least several years that this had been done. My first visit to the site produced probably 30 horn corals and brachiopods strewn just across the drive all the way down to the street, pushed there by the flooding caused by rainfall. Obviously, no one had been there in quite a while. The floor of the quarry has become “terraced” due to erosion. The terraces are at most 3 inches tall and may run up to 30-40 ft along the curved contour of the floor. Last month I visited for the 2nd time this year…. with the recent drought followed by several gulley-washer storms within a week’s time I had a feeling a lot of material could have washed out. I was correct. In 3 visits (Th-S-Su) I ended up with 65 lbs of fossils. Around half being brachiopods…. Herbertella, Platystrophia, and Lepidocyclus. (about half of the brachs found) Along with some decent horn corals and cephalopods. Often times a wide range of specimens would be clustered in a small area, such as in the photo below. What all do you see in the photo? Or, there might be a cluster of the same kinds. The brachs in the next pictures, were found clustered in each of their own 1 square foot areas. As if someone set them there. Just sitting right on top of the ground rather than stuck in the rock. At this time I don't intend to visit this site again until next spring, although I may have second thoughts if a huge storm rumbles through in the Fall.
  4. In 2011 a veteran rockhound (no longer in shape to go on field trips) in the Dayton Gem and Mineral club mentioned this no-name Ordivician site where he’d had a lot of success in the past finding fossils. I’ve visited the site about 5-6 times now and have never been disappointed. It has a constant erosion of horn corals, brachiopods, cephalopods, bryozoans. As I heard it, at least 20 years ago an entrepreneur bought a hill/hillside plot of land just within the Dayton, OH city limits, less than 2 miles east of downtown. Just on the edge of a commercial business area. (looking west) (looking north from the driveway) He immediately turned into a small limestone quarry. Within 10 years he ended his business and the quarry has seen little or no activity except for an occasional illegal dumping. The “Y” shaped quarry is entered by walking up an eroded blacktop driveway. The East “wall” is about 150 yards away, the Southeast “wall” about 75 yards, and the South “wall” about 175 yards. An apartment complex can be found within 50 yards beyond the SE and S “walls”. The far “walls’” base being maybe 8-10 feet higher than where the drive meets the quarry floor. The West side of the quarry is lined with trees sitting atop a 3-6 ft tall hill. The old business district begins just on the other side of the hill. To be continued....
  5. I was out cleaning windows at one of my clients properties when I stumbled across this beast! Let first explain that the property has large limestone (I think?) rocks going around the edge of the property, these where placed there in the late 50's or early 60's. I climb over these rocks to get to some of the windows and it shames me to admit that I never noticed it before . But anyway, there I was cleaning windows when something got my attention...FOSSILS! So, I went to the owner and asked if I could remove a few, they said "sure, get rid of the junk!" I took what I could safely transport and said I would be back for the rest tomorrow and that was today. So, here are a few pics of my find, I will post more later, wifey needs to eat and I am getting a look as we speak . I used a yard stick for scale.
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