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Found 378 results

  1. Trilobite Plate Fragment from MN Decorah?

    I found this chunk of shale poking around a bluff side a while back near Lilydale Park in Minneapolis, MN. The fragment pictured is translucent and is slightly concave, it reminds me of a cheek plate but Im not sure. Im new at this so im pretty clueless, I appreciate any help
  2. Hello, New to the forum and collecting fossils in general. Went to my moms house and mentioned that I had been fossil hunting and she says "I have found some fossils before." and she pulls out this giant worm like thing. This was found in Port Hope Ontario possibly up to 25 years ago. I have included both a wet and dry picture. The fossil seems to have a dark red tinge to it. Also the back had a ton of fossils on it I have attached a picture of the back as well. Any help with an identification would be much appreciated. Thanks Folks and happy hunting:)
  3. Fossil ID help needed

    It was found in southwest missouri, they said they found them together like the first picture but they weren't attached.
  4. Coprolite?

    Can anyone help me identify this? I found it under the bleachers at my brother's football game nearly 30 years ago. The bleachers/field/entire outdoor facility had just undergone rennovation. The pen in the picture has a ruler on it and the notepad is smaller than standard. This was found in North Texas. Thanks in advance for any information.
  5. Heirloom Fossils Identification Help

    These have been passed down from parent to child for generations. Anyway we can no longer remember what these were originally identified as. Possible plants? I see rings and some spots where it looks like a branch would’ve grown.
  6. The Basic Dinosaur Egg Guide Many people often mistake a concretion for an egg, to help clarify what is a concretion, and what is a real egg, here is a guide. A quick overview with examples: How to spot a concretion: How are they different from eggs? A concretion is a rather common rock made of tightly compressed minerals. Typically, concretions are a smooth sphere or oval with little to no surface texture or just a few bumps. Often nearly a perfect sphere, sometimes more of an oval. In a concretion, there is no eggshell. If you cannot see eggshell then you do not have an egg. If it looks the same shape as modern egg, such as from chicken then you do not have an egg. Concretions may have fragments breaking off and these will tend to be smooth on both sides. They tend to be dull earthy colors with a different composition in the center, as seen by a change in color. A different color in the center normally means you do not have an egg. Often circular bandings can be seen around exterior of concretions. Sizes of concretions range from just an inch, or a few millimeters, up to more than 10 ft (3 m). Egg sizes, along one side, range from just an inch or a few millimeters and top out at around 8 in (20 cm). If you find an oval or round shape, which is larger than 8 in (20 cm) along a side then it is probably not an egg. For more information on concretions: https://www.priweb.org/index.php/education/education-projects-programs/earth-101/concretions http://tumblehomelearning.com/geologists-find-largest-dinosaur-eggs-in-the-world-another-fraudulent-fossil/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concretion In video form: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B5IoyLEwkMY Example of concretions, these three were incorrectly given an ID as “dinosaur eggs” however they are clearly not: From Tumblehome Learning, link above Pseudofossils: There are some pseudofossils, which can have a similar appearance to an actual egg, right down to seeming like there are bits of eggshell. This pseudofossil does look similar to an egg and even seems to have eggshell, however it is not an egg and is actually geologic. The surface ranges too much in texture and composition. Pic from Montana State University, taken by P. Germano Trace fossils: Many times, an actual trace fossil can be mistaken for an egg, common examples of this are pupa cases and cocoons. As one can see below, they do tend to have an egg-like shape and are yet another perfect example of why shape alone should not be used when trying to identify eggs. The three below are important trace fossils, just not eggs. Pic by Tony Martin, Ph.D. How to spot a real egg: The best and only true sign you have an actual egg is eggshell actually being present. Eggs come in many shapes from a semi-rounded, elongated oval to a perfect sphere and many others. Shape is not a good indicator of an egg. It is useful but only when combined with other details. Eggshell often has surface ornamentation that gives it a unique texture which can be seen by the naked eye or with a hand lens. There are many such ornamentations and they are used to help distinguish one egg type from another. On the surface look for little bumps, ridges with valleys, river channels, and similar textures. Individual fragments of eggshell are rather common in some geologic formations so be on the lookout for a larger grouping of eggshell. From University of California Museum of Paleontology Also read: http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/59654-dinosaur-eggs-lowell-carhart-guide/ Examples of real eggshell: Example of eggshell fragments: An eggshell fragment from Maiasaura, which is the oogenus Spheroolithus oosp. Pic by W. Freimuth. Examples of real eggs: A clutch of Troodon formosus eggs, which are the oospecies Prismatoolithus levis. Pic from Museum of the Rockies Do I have embryos inside this egg? Most likely no. Embryonic remains are extremely rare within eggs, and you add that with the rarity of eggs to start and it is a remote possibility. No fossilized yolks have been found and since they are soft tissue, it is near impossible for any to fossilize. I still think this is an egg! If you still think you have an actual egg, then please start a thread. Take close detailed pictures with something for scale such as a ruler and provide all the information you can about it--like where it was found. Good pictures will help greatly with a proper and correct ID. Below is an example of how to best photograph an egg or eggshell. There is clear lighting, a background which is clearly different than the eggshell in question and a scale bar. Lights can be as simple as a desk lamp; a scale bar can just be a ruler and the background can be very simple, in the example just a paper towel. Megaloolithus egg. Pic from Montana State University, taken by P. Germano If you would like to learn much more on eggs, here is the advanced egg guide which goes in depth. Also, see the advanced guide for sources. Eric P.
  7. Several years ago I found this item on beach in the Fort Myers, FL area. I don't remember what beach if that matters, possibly Lover's Key. I thought it was just an oyster shell but kept it because it looked like an ear. That was before I started collecting fossils. Now I see fossils everywhere!! Do you think this might be part of a tympanic bone from a small cetacean? Or just a weird shell? I've never examined a tympanic bone in person, just seen pics. Thoughts?
  8. Fossil id

    Hi all, gotten bit by the by the fossil bug and I am now analyzing everything I see. I found this on the beach of a lake (finger lakes NY) where I am regularly finding tabulate, rugose, brachiopod, bryzoan type fossils. It's a bit difficult for me to suggest any specific time frame simply because the glacier cut through many levels and then everything has been tumbled through rough wave actions. Thanks for your help! It looks like a skull to me but idk of what
  9. mammal canines identification

    hello everyone, recently I found this lot of canines for sale. the owner knows nothing about them. Now I know that it's really difficult to identify a genus from a canine tooth, but maybe there is someone with more experience than me about florida pleistocene fossils that can help me. thank you for anyone one who can help me.
  10. Hey all! I was visiting the Jurassic Coast in Devon yesterday and found these 3 fossils (I think) under the rocky cliffs on Lulworth Cove in Devon, England. ..does anyone know what they might be please? I have labelled each one 1, 2 and 3 and number 3 has 3 pictures attached; 3a,3b,3c. Unfortunately this is larger and a more difficult shape of rock to photograph. any help or advice on the ID of any of these would be great. PS. I am an amateur and have no idea if they even are fossils, but it would be exciting if they were. Thanks again for any help!
  11. Recommended Books for ID?

    Are there any recommended books for ID'ing vertebrate fossils? Specifically, Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene fauna from the Southeast US or Florida? I am aware of Hurlburt's Fossil Vertebrates of Florida and it's on my acquisition list, but are there any others? Thanks! MikeG
  12. What is it?

    What it could be? Ukraine, Lviv region. Thanks!
  13. Fossil shark tooth

    good day everyone, this summer I went to Uzbekistan for holidays, knowing that I could have found some fossil, in fact once upon a time uzbekistan like many other countries was covered by the tethys sea! the great Aral lake (now almost dried up because of men) is what remains of the tethys. During my trip I found many formation rich of fossil, unfortunately the carbonate matrix was too hard to work without my beloved Estwing and I had to leave all those beautiful coral and shells . However during a visit at the bottom of Aral sea, inside the shale and sands exposed by the drying up of the sea,I found this beautiful shark tooth. Sharks are not my specialization so I'm a little bit lost. With a quick research I discovered that those Sediments are probably Eocene/oligocene in age. May it be a Striatolamia?
  14. Trilobite ID help

    Hello all, I bought this trilobite for my uncle for Christmas. It didn't come with any identification information, but I assume it is from Morocco. I was wondering if anyone could help me determine its name and age. Thanks for any help.
  15. ID help please

    I found these two fossils on a beach near the Mackinac bridge in Lake Michigan, USA. Can anyone tell me what they are? The first specimen with the flat dark inclusion is about 5 cm. The second specimen with the many small lines and holes is about 4 cm. Thanks for your help.
  16. I think this might be a sea lily?

    I picked this up off of the shoreline of Norwood, Michigan this summer. Initially I just thought it was a weird, pretty shell fossil. Until this morning, when I read the recent Atlas Obscura article about sea lily fossils (https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/sea-lily-fossil-utah-evolutionary-mystery). The bit that caught my attention was that crinoid fossils often segment into little 'cheerio' shapes. I have SO many Norwood specimens with the distinctive cheerio on them (see the second image, left), and it got me thinking that the white frond shape might be a sea lily? Anyway, I'll be happy to learn whatever it might be, as it's definitely one of the weirdest things I've ever found on the beach. Thanks! Made In Michigan
  17. Bug or no bug?

    I found this agate on a beach in Northern California. It appears to have a flying insect trapped inside of it. Is this even possible? Or is it an illusion? Who would I contact to find out for sure?
  18. Bone found on beach

    Hello - I found this bone fragment washed up on the beach near Ocean City, New Jersey, USA. Any identification help would be great! Thanks!
  19. Help with identification

    Hi, I wondered if anyone could please help with the identification of this bone. It was found on St Anne's Beach in the UK. It has a claw like prominence midway down the shaft. The bone on approx 10.5cm long. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you.
  20. Hey everyone, I am looking for any reccomended websites or databases that can help me identify several invertebrate specimens in my collection. Specimens range from ammonites, echinoderms, brachiopods, molluscs etc. I have locations where most were found or acquired, but I would like to get a species ID on them at least. Morphology tends to blur at times depending on the sample. Any references or ideas?
  21. Shark Tooth Identification Help

    Hi, I recently bought this tooth from a friend, but I am uncertain which species it belongs to. The root is very thin with great white characteristics, but the lack of serrations on the blade is more like a mako. My best guess is that it is a Giant White Shark (Charcharodon Plicatitis). It measure 2.75 inches. The last 2 photos show the tooth in comparison to a Great White tooth on the right side and a Mako Shark tooth on the left side of the tooth in question. What do you believe it is? Thank you for helping me out.
  22. Hi everyone! Yesterday I found a shark tooth on a beach in Jacksonville, Florida that I would love help identifying. Does anyone have any ideas what it could be? Thank you so much in advance for your help.
  23. Shark Tooth Identification Help

    I recently found this shark tooth on the beach in Wild Dunes, South Carolina. Can anyone help me identify what kind of shark this is from? Age of the tooth?
  24. identification

    hi i found this on the beach on the Isle of Wight, UK Was wondering what it might be many thanks
  25. What's this?

    This was sitting in my yard when I bought this house. The owner found it but didn't know what it was. Now every time I walk by it, it bugs me. Anyone have any idea's? The fossil's here on Vancouver Island are cretaceous sea creatures for the most part if that helps. Thanks!
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