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Found 16 results

  1. readinghiker

    Unknown lamniform

    Hello all! I have around a dozen of these teeth. (Found in New Mexico. Coniacian.) The very prominent lingual protuberance should be diagnostic, but I can't find a match. Eostriatolamia tenuiplicatus looks good, but the crown has striations, and these don't. Archaeolamna kopingensis also looked good, but the secondary cusps of this species are oriented away from the main cusp. Leptostyrax macrorhiza also has labial striations. The narrowness of the cusps and crown also has me baffled. Any ideas?
  2. I am really excited about a project we have been working on. We decided to switch our shark displays from the ones based on Geological era to a taxonomic display style. We had been considering this since we made a similar switch with our dinosaurs. It has made those programs flow more easily and i think allowed the kids to get a better understanding of the animals. We originally set our displays up as they were because we simply did not have enough material to do taxonomic displays. There were a few orders of sharks for which we had only one or two fossils and one extinct order for which we ha
  3. Free Access pdf link: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/08912963.2020.1861608?needAccess=true Shimada, K., Bonnan, M. F., Becker, M. A., Griffiths, M. L. (2021). Ontogenetic growth pattern of the extinct megatooth shark Otodus megalodon—implications for its reproductive biology, development, and life expectancy. Historical Biology. Abstract: The extinct megatooth shark, Otodus megalodon (Lamniformes: Otodontidae), is known primarily from its gigantic teeth in the late Neogene marine fossil record. It is known to reach at least 14.1‒15.3 m in length, but its r
  4. Praefectus

    Otodus sokolovi

    L1: 7.6 cm L2: 6.2 cm W: 6.0 cm
  5. fossilsonwheels

    STH Micros in need of ID help

    I am fairly comfortable with the STH micros as far as identification goes but I found a few things that I need some help with. First up is one that I am 90% sure on the ID but I want to be sure. I believe I found a couple of Raja teeth. The first one I found looks to be complete and tiny, a little over 1mm. I know skate teeth are somewhat uncommon in this fauna and this would be my first one.
  6. I have a few unknowns from the Cenomanian of Russia that I am starting to get around to photographing and identifying. I am practicing with my actual camera instead of my phone so the pics are just ok but will get better lol The first one is from near Fedoravka Tambov Region of Russia. This one is about 13 mm or so. I think the ID when purchased was Cretoxyrhina but I do not know how accurate that is. I thought perhaps Cretalamna or maybe Dwardius or something completely different. I just do not know. It is a really striking tooth though and I would like to get some idea of wh
  7. This tooth was originally labelled as an Cardabiodon sp., but both dimensions and general crown's features led me to buy it due to curiosity (also was really cheap). The crown is higher than the root. The cutting edges bear no serrations. There're traces of secondary lateral cusplets. The lingual face of the root seems to have a rounded lingual foramen on the enlarged torus. The tooth, probably a lamniform, was collected near Fedorovka village, Tambov region, Russia and goes back to the Cenonian epoch (Cretaceous). Any guess?
  8. fossilsonwheels

    Cardabiodontid or something else ?

    I saw this Cretaceous Lamniformes tooth pop up on the auction site that shall not be named and grabbed it. It was inexpensive so it is not really much of a gamble. It was sold as Cardabiodon sp. It comes from the Cenomanian of Russia, Fedorovka Village, Tambov region. That is all the geological information i could get. I have not really studied up on Cardabiodontid teeth very much as I planned on getting one down the road. I did take a look at some papers on Cardabiodon and Dwardius yesterday, I also looked around for photos to compare with the pictures we were given of the tooth. The scale in
  9. Just thought I'd share this post from our Facebook Group. Had a blast sharing some of my shark fossils with visitors this last Saturday. If you can contribute and give back to your community and society in general I promise that you'll find the experience rewarding and enriching. Pass on your knowledge to the next generation and get them exited about the sciences and paleontology.
  10. After the Hybodontids, our program starts to transition toward the modern sharks. We introduce lamniform sharks and the cow sharks. We will not be able to spend much time at all on the Cow and Crow Sharks. They only get a brief introduction and a look at the teeth. Squalicorax is an important species for us even though we do not spend a lot of time on it. The students in first few classes we do presentations for will be going home with Squalicorax teeth from Morocco. We would like to spend more time on the Cow sharks eventually but we only have one tooth to show them and we will have to edit c
  11. I am not sure what species this Cretaceous shark tooth belonged to. It comes from Kansas but I really do not have much more information. It is 2 cm on the slant. It is really a nice tooth and it was a bargain. My best guess is Archeolamna which I believe is found in the chalk in Kansas. I do not think it is robust enough to be Cardabiodon and I do not know what other species it would match from the area. Any help would be appreciated.
  12. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 27, 2018.
  13. Fossil-Hound

    Otodus obliquus

    Three specimens acquired from a trade with @gavialboy Specimens are from an undisclosed location within the Aquia Formation linked to Purse State Park.
  14. From Wikipedia: "Members of the order are distinguished by possessing two dorsal fins, an anal fin, five gill slits, eyes without nicititating membranes, and a mouth extending behind the eyes. Also, unlike other sharks, they maintain a higher body temperature than the surrounding water". Lit.: DETLEV THIES & ARMIN LEIDNER (2011) Sharks and guitarfishes (Elasmobranchii) from the Late Jurassic of Europe. Palaeodiversity 4: 63–184; Stuttgart, 30 December 2011. (version with low resolution, but still 16MB to download)
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