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  1. PaleoOrdo

    Please help ID these fossiles

    I found several kinds of gastropods and two other uknown fossiles in the Kalvsjøen formation, late Ordovivcian at Hadeland in the Oslo field, which I like to share. The limestones in this formation are called 'the Gastropod limestones'. Can anyone please help ID some of these fossils. I guess some of the gastropods cannot be ID-ed, but I hope some of them can be at some level and the other unknown animals. Any help are appreciated. The first rock (the first 3 pictures) has one strange fossile (to the left) and several small gastropods, some very small, which I could only see by taking sev
  2. Denis Arcand

    My best guess is Sowerbyella ?

    Hi, I am still new at identifying brachiopods, I know there is a great diversity of similar species, which makes it even more difficult for me. Can you help me identify these two brachiopods, they both feature a semicircular outline, concavo-convex profile, and small size (~1.0 cm wide). They also have a wide, straight hinge numerous and very fine lines and ribs. Not sure if they are the same species, one of them has a larger size with a bit smaller width compared to length. So I don't think they are the same species. The plate was found in the Nicol
  3. Denis Arcand

    I found a brachiopod with lips

    Hi fellow fossil collector, can you identify this brachiopod for me? I recently found a very different brachiopod, where I usually collect my fossils in an Upper Ordovician formation (Click here to see the site). I can easily find hundreds of swerbyella, but this fossil is very different from what I usually find, its huge size, 3 times larger than any fossil i usually find, and its different shape puzzles me. It measures approximately 3cm x 2.5cm. It also has intriguing concentric protuberances composed of a primary and secondary shell on external shell surface. As you
  4. PaleoOrdo

    What is this?

    lI found this rock in a quarry, at Hadeland in Norway, Katian-Ordovician age, but cannot figure out what is is. Any one have an idea? A piece fell off and then we can see a very smooth surfce inside (black part).
  5. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Toronto Brachiopod And Bryozoan Help

    I found these two fossils from Mimico Creek in Toronto, Canada and they both belong to the Georgian Bay formation, late Ordovician. The first one I believe is a Pseudolingula, but I can't really nail it down to a species level. The other is a bryozoan, and I was thinking of Prasopora. What do you guys think? The brachiopod I found in shale, but the bryozoan in a limestone bed with other bryozoas. The brachiopod: The bryozoa:
  6. Here in Norway is snowing now, so it is not the best time for fossilhunting. But there is another hunting we can do: to look for small things in rocks already found. This is much easier if you take photos of the rocks and then scann them for the details. That is what I did today and I found several things, among them a small orthocone nautiloid. What I wish to show, however, is some unknown animals, which I hope someone can help me identify or suggest a possiblility. I will start, in this corona-time, with a greeting from the Late Ordovician formation in Norway, just before the End Ordovician
  7. PaleoOrdo

    Alge or sponge?

    I wonder if this rock from very late Ordovicium in the Oslo field, Norway, shows an alge or a sponge? The rock was bigger originally with 4 bumps of equal size, 3-4 cm away from each other, but 3 of them had very unclear surface pattern, so I chopped away that part, showing here the rest. Another fossile from the same formation, 500 meters away (the structure about 3 cm in diameter):
  8. From the album: Fossil Art

    This picture was taken as is, it was not photoshopped, everything is real in the picture. Only the contrast has been adjusted a little bit. I took this picture at a small beach where the fossils are underwater, so I literarily fish for the fossils. You can read my two articles on the subject by clicking on the following links: The day I went fishing for fossils (part I) The day I went fishing for fossils (part II)
  9. My first post was so popular that I decided to do a second. I went to the same place, and found more many rich and colorful fossils, and got enough material to write to you about it. For those who missed my first post, you will find it HERE As you will see in this article, I combine my two passions, collecting fossils and color photography. I love color, creating black and white photographs of fossils is good for scientific research, when you are a paleontologist and want to record the small details for science and posterity. But for people who are just starting to explore the wor
  10. PaleoOrdo

    Nautiloid? Help Id please

    I found this stone with some unknow pattern in the Kalvsjøen formation, Oslo field (late Katian, in late Ordovicium). Can it be two nautiloids or alge? It is some small gastropods there too. The length of the longest "nautiloid" is about 7 cm.
  11. Denis Arcand

    Rock having goosebump

    I found this while fossil hunting see my post The day I went fishing for fossils. I'm wondering what it is , it's between 4 and 6 inches I guess, didn't have an rule with me at that time .
  12. Denis Arcand

    Late Ordovician, Brachiopod and Bryozoan

    From the album: Hash Plates (Late Ordovician)

    I found this multicolor hash plate with many other in an Ordovician formation, see my post The day I went fishing for fossils. The picture was taken in full sunlight

    © Denis Arcand

  13. Denis Arcand

    Late Ordovician, Brachiopods and Bi-valves

    From the album: Hash Plates (Late Ordovician)

    I like the natural color of this red shales and sandstones formation

    © Denis Arcand

  14. Denis Arcand

    Late Ordovician, Brachiopods

    From the album: Hash Plates (Late Ordovician)

    The camera flash is giving this stunning color the the matric and fossils.

    © Denis Arcand

  15. Denis Arcand

    Very small cephalopod ?

    I found this on one of my hash plate, is it what I think it is, a very small cephalopod ?
  16. PaleoOrdo

    How many animals is in this rock?

    I wonder if this is some animal or just a crystal formation. The surface is extremely smooth, when I touch it with my finger. The formation is from Late Ordovician. Pict. 1 Pict.2 Pict.3 Pict.4
  17. Last fall I went on a fossil hunting trip to a creek in Adams, NY. Along this creek were exposures of the Whetstone Gulf and Pulaski formations. There were many different layers, each with different fauna. Some layers were barren, while others had many species. Some of the most common fossils were cryptolithus and triarthrus trilobites, as well as brachiopods, bivalves, gastropods, ostracods, and straight shelled nautiloids. Some layers contained pyrite and some of the fossils in these layers were partially pyritized. (Including some of the trilobites!!).
  18. Not a huge piece of my collection but still neat. The fine details of these marine animals are often lost to the ages but every once in awhile you find a few pieces that catch your eye. I was digging through my collections curious about those fossils I found when I first started collecting. Came across this little invertebrate nugget. It is worn but the color and how it hugged the matrix was attractive. Taxonomy: Animalia; Bryozoa; Ectoprocta; Gymnolaemata; Trepostomata; Amalgamata; Monticuliporidae
  19. JUAN EMMANUEL

    Toronto Conularia

    Conularia formosa (Miller and Dyer, 1878). Specimen with a positive and a negative counterpart (matrix). Found while smashing a limestone layer at Mimico Creek, Toronto, Ontario. The matrix of the Conularia has the negative on it, as well as bryozoan bits. Bibliography: Ontario. Department of Mines. The Stratigraphy And Paleontology Of Toronto And Vicinity.
  20. I was reading a book about fossil fishes and there was a chapter dedicated to sharks and their cousins. Apparently there were chondricthyan scales found in the Late Ordovician and Early Silurian rocks. Since I hunt the Late Ordovician Georgian Bay formation in Toronto, Ontario and various Early Silurian formations in Hamilton, Ontario, what are the chances of me coming across these scales? Should I keep my eyes open and what should I look for?
  21. rocksnstars

    Mystery Star

    I am a mineral and fossil collector and an amateur astronomer and my email is rocksnstars, so rocks collected that include a star shape are special. Most of the ones I have are the crinoid stems with star-shaped centers. This is the first time I've seen anything like this. I believe I have met the requirements of providing a good photo with a scale, and I know the period is Late Ordivician. I tagged Ohio because I think that is where it is from, but it is possibly Indiana, however BOTH sites are the SAME period and well known. I collected the two places the same day, and unfortunately dur
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