Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'maastrichtian'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 79 results

  1. This weekend we had a quick stop near the city of Mons in the south of Belgium. It is not commonly known that in some forrests in this area are ancient quarries of Maastrichtian phosphatic chalk, not all are accessible but with a reasearch on old maps some of them can be found with a little effort you can clear out a spot on the ground and search for a multitude of small fossils. we only stayed 2 hours, but we did find our fair share of tiny but beautiful brachiopods, bryozoans, shark teeth, dentaliums, bellemnite fragments,... . @Tidgy's Dad , you'll like those little critters and even a few teeth and an echinoid spine:
  2. Hemiaster_batalleri_2.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Hemiaster (bolbaster) batalleri (Lambert, 1933)
  3. Hemiaster_batalleri_3.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Hemiaster (bolbaster) batalleri (Lambert, 1933)
  4. Hemiaster_batalleri_1.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Hemiaster (bolbaster) batalleri (Lambert, 1933)
  5. Plans for the 3rd Møns Klint Fossil Excavation

    Nowadays, I'm mostly focused on preparing for my high school finals. But in my free time... Well I started to plan the 3rd Møns Klint Fossil Excavation (MKFE), as part of the larger Møns Klint Fossil Research Program. This field session has been planned for mid-August, and will last about 2 weeks - needless to say, I'm pretty excited Especially when considering the success of the 2nd MKFE... Collection policy will remain mostly the same as last time, meaning that arthropod, cephalopod, echinoderm and vertebrate material will be the priority. Of course, there will be a slight change; with more focus on articulated/associated remains (because single, eroded fragments are becoming a bit too numerous...). Also, last year, when I was collecting anything significant (e.g. articulated echinoderm remains), I forgot to try and find associated zone fossils. This time, I'll remember to collect zone fossils (brachiopods and belemnites), as they can be pretty useful for determining more precisely the age of a specimen. Of course, I'll use this field trip as an opportunity to donate to the GeoCenter museum some of the fossils from the 2nd MKFE. Can't wait to go back there!! -Christian
  6. Yesterday I made a visit to the Natural History Museum of Maastricht (The Netherlands) for my Birthday The museum is only a 40 minute drive from where I live and it showcases the entire natural history of the region, the cool thing about this museum is that the fossils which are showcased here are all regional fossils from The Netherlands, Germany & Belgium. I am starting the topic off with 2 pictures of the special exhibit called Microsculptures, which shows giant detailed photographs of insects to show how magnifecent they are. Then I went on to the "Mosaleum" which holds "Bér" the holotype specimen of Prognathodon saturator
  7. Beekite rings

    Last January 12, I found some Exogyra sp. oysters in a limestone Late Campanian / Early Maastrichtian strata (SE Pyrenees, Catalonia, Spain), who turned to show abundant beekite rings. I owe to @abyssunder my knowledge of this mineral phenomenon, which, in my area,occurs mainly over laminar-type shells like oysters' (It can occur on other fossils, though). Have you fossils with beekite rings ?
  8. Diplodetus_5.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Close-up view of the four gonopores
  9. Diplodetus_4.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Peristome D-shaped with the opening facing forward; with narrow rim. Labrum slifhtly projecting
  10. Hi everyone. I would expose a paleontological ID question that intrigues me. Let me do it in a storytelling style. Prologue Last November I found this beautiful bug in a limestone Upper Campanian /Lower Maastrichtian strata in the SE of Pyrenees, Catalonia (Spain). So, I start a little detective process... which turned not to be so little. This cidaroid specimen is almost complete, retaining even its plates, which is rather rare. In fact, its plates are of most importance in this story. Chapter 1 In 1933 French paleontologist Jules Lambert found some cidaroid specimens in the Pyrenees, in a place not far from I live, called Falgars (a Holy Mary sanctuary surrounded by meadows and woods, a very nice place). He described the species as Typocidaris falgarsensis, designing a holotype. He donated –among others- the holotype to the Museu Geologic del Seminari de Barcelona (Seminary’s –catholic- of Barcelona Geological Museum). But during the turmoil of revolutionary events of Spanish Civil War the Seminary’s was sacked in 1936 and the holotype was lost. In 1997 paleontologist J.J.Carrasco did a revision of the species and fixed a neotype, a specimen found some 4 km west of Falgars, in strata continuity, near the little village of Sant Julià de Cerdanyola. He reclassified it as Temnocidaris (Stereocidaris) falgarsensis (Lambert 1933). He did it in this paper (in Spanish) (The exact site where the original holotype was found is now forgotten) Sant Julià de Cerdanyola village I went to the MGSB museum, where director Dr. Calzada kindly allowed me to compare my specimen with the neotype, and as far as I know they are the same. ID solved? Not entirely In 1991 North-American paleontologists D.B.Blake and W.J.Zinsmeister described a new genus and new species of cidaroid echinoid from the Maastrichtian of Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula: Almucidaris durhami. As they said here The species is unique in that the plates of the female expanded and hollowed to form marsupia. Maybe not so unique, though, as during the last 90’s (I don’t know when exactly) some specimens of cidaroid echinoids forming marsupia were found around... Sant Julià de Cerdanyola. You can see them in this thread of the Spanish Foro Nautilus (my specimen is the last one, and was found some 15 km. west of Sant Julià, not far from the town of Berga. Note that it has no marsupia, so it is arguably male). Andrew B. Smith took the view that Pyrenean Upper Cretaceous cidaroids showing marsupia should be classed in the genus Almucidaris, as he stated in The Echinoid Directory. In fact A.B.Smith made for the first time this statement in: Smith, A.B. & Jeffery, C.H. 2000. Maastrichtian and Palaeocene echinoids: a key to world faunas. Special Papers in Palaentology 63, 1-406. Unfortunately, I have no access to this paper. I have sent some messages to TED, with no answer. Unsolved enigmas So, we Spanish amateur or professional paleontologists have assumed Andrew B. Smith’s view, calling our specimens Almucidaris falgarsensis. But some questions remain unresolved. a) If specimens with marsupia are females, what about the male ones (as mine)? The belonging of arguably male specimens of Temnocidaris (Stereocidaris) falgarsensis to the genus Almucidaris can’t be stated? This would lead to a very paradoxical situation, with females of one species belonging to a genus and male ones remaining in another (a bizarre sort of sexual discrimination ). b- Are Almucidaris durhami and Almucidaris falgarsensis the same species or only belong to the same genus? c) Have been found specimens in other places, apart from Antarctica and Pyrenees, of cidaroid echinoids having developed large brood chambers in the plates? I highly appreciate any information and suggestions, and I hope I have not bored you.
  11. Cretaceous turtle, Oued Zem

    Hey everyone I ordered this piece last night, it will probably arrive in the course of this week. According to the listing it is a turtle bone from the cretaceous phosphate layers of Oued Zem in Morocco, but the exact species wasn't identified. But unfortunatly I am not very familiar with Cretaceous sea turles from Morocco, I just found it a nice piece to add to my Oued Zem display. So does anyone know which turtle species can be found in the cretaceous phosphate layers of Oued Zem? The only species that came out while googling was Lytoloma elegans, but I am sure some of you might know other species that lived in Oued Zem during the Cretaceous? Thanks in advance!
  12. Geology: Tiny zircon crystals help trace the birth of the mighty Mississippi By Dale Gnidovec, The Columbus Dispatch, Nov 11, 2018 https://www.dispatch.com/news/20181111/geology-tiny-zircon-crystals-help-trace-birth-of-mighty-mississippi Potter-McIntyre, S.L., Breeden, J.R. and Malone, D.H., 2018. A Maastrichtian birth of the Ancestral Mississippi River system: Evidence from the U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology of the McNairy Sandstone, Illinois, USA. Cretaceous Research. Volume 91, November 2018, Pages 71-79 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667117305414 Yours, Paul H.
  13. TaylMcKinn Cretaceous Bryozoa from the Campanian and Maastrichtian of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains, United States Paul D. Taylor & Frank K. McKinney Scripta Geologica, 132: 1-346, 141 pls, 5 figs, 2 tables, Leiden SIZE:about 10,5 Mb Nice to see a species named after Brood!!
  14. Almerarhynchia virgiliana

    New genus and new species first described by Dr. Sebastian Calzada Badia in: C a l z a d a , S., 1974. Almerarhynchia n. gen. virgiliana n. sp. del Maastrichtiense de Figols, Prepireneo catalan. Acta Geológica Hispanica, 9 (3): 92-97. http://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/7365. ID of the specimen confirmed by Dr. Calzada.
  15. New update from the Cretaceous of Romania :)

    Hey everyone - hope you're all well Wanted to share this (in part cause I'm half Romanian ).. It's a conference poster presenting some recent research findings regarding a productive vertebrate microsite from the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) of Hatzeg Basin (Romania). It reports some new micro-vertebrate material, including crocodile teeth, lil' bones and even eggshell. Voicu, Vasile & Csiki-Sava (2018). The Cretaceous Swamp just gets bigger: new data on the faunal composition of the Pui Swamp microvertebrate bonebed, Maastrichtian of the Haţeg Basin. The Tenth International Zoological Congress of “Grigore Antipa” Museum, 21-24 November 2018, Bucharest, Romania Here's a link to the poster from where you can download a pdf of it : Voicu et al. 2018 Hatzeg poster -Christian
  16. PDF request (book about Cretaceous fauna of Jordan)

    Just found out about this book - "Fossils of the Harrana Fauna and the Adjacent Areas" (2009), written by Hani Kaddumi. It basically describes the marine fauna of the Muwaqqar Chalk Marl Formation, a Maastrichtian unit represented in parts of Jordan. Due to faunal content and age, I think it'd be a good source for contextual information regarding my MKFRP project. Would anyone have a PDF of the book? citation details: Kaddumi, H. F. (2009). Fossils of the Harrana Fauna and the Adjacent Areas. Publications of the Eternal River Museum of Natural History, Amman, pp. 232-239. Thanks for any help -Christian
  17. Hello everyone, Last Saturday, October 6th, I joint a fossil hunting excursion of the Dutch geological society (NGV) to the ENCI quarry, near the town of Maastricht (The Netherlands). This quarry has been in production since 1926, and has been one of the best fossil hunting sites of the Netherlands ever since. Worldwide, the youngest time interval of the Cretaceous Period is known as the Maastrichtian, a reference to the rock layers exposed in this area. We owe this international reference to the instrumental work of Belgian geologist André Hubert Dumont, who, in 1849, first described the rock layers in the valley of the Meuse River, close to the present-day ENCI quarry. Consequently, the rock sequence in the ENCI quarry constitutes the original type-locality of the Maastrichtian Stage. The Maastrichtian rocks are also world famous for their excavated mosasaur skeletons (the word 'mosa' is latin for the river Meuse. Mosasaurs are also named after this locality). Yet, unfortunately, all good things come to an end: the ENCI quarry is closing down. The production has stopped this month, and the quarry is now turned into a nature conservation area. Most of the quarry walls are currently being covered up, to make 'nice' gently slopes. Burying all remaining fossils forever.... So the remaining few excursions this year are the very last opportunity to hunt some fossils in this once glorious pit. I have been there a couple of times this year, and every trip fills me with melancholy. While the hunting is still relatively okay(ish), the possibilities become fewer and fewer, and only a very small part of the total strata can be examined....
  18. Today we went on a fieldtrip with the BVP ( https://paleontologie.be/ ) our local geology club to the quarry of Eben Emaal in Belgium, just across the border with Maastricht in the Netherlands. Here we can prospect Maastrichtian marine deposits. The fossils that were collected were; Belemnites, oysters, pecten, echinoids and a few shark teeth. there was evan a lucky one who found a mosasaur tooth. personally I did find 4 big echinoids ( hemipneustes striatoradiatus )and a few belemites, my girlfriend found 2 smaller echinoids ( catopygus ) and a few nice shark teeth.
×