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Found 113 results

  1. UPDATE: This could be Murchisonia sp. which has been recorded from the underlying Dundee Limestone and deposited in the Ohio State University Museum of Biological Diversity. Hello, I found a rare conispiral gastropod steinkern in the middle Devonian (Givetian) Silica Shale of Paulding, Ohio, last week. It's the first strongly conispiral gastropod I've ever found in the Middle Devonian (let-alone the Silica Shale). I looked through the FUMMP online database as well as the "Strata and Megafossils of the Middle Devonian Silica Formation" published by FUMMP and couldn't find any taxa that looked like this. It has the general shape of Paleozygopleura known from the Hamilton Group of New York. Is anyone aware of a snail with this general morphology that has been reported from the Silica Shale? Scale in mm.
  2. Are these crinoid arms?

    Hi. I've spent the winter reviewing my finds from 2017. Here are two images. Initially I thought the radiating arms were those of a brachiopod, but I'm now having my doubts. Could they be crinoid arms? (The specimen in the top image is on the upper left corner.) I failed to include a measurement scale, but the top specimen would be covered by a penny, and the bottom by a nickel. They're tiny. Thoughts? (Paulding, Ohio; Middle Devonian; Silica Shale)
  3. Trilobit, Silica Shale

    This might be a job for @piranha This trilobit looks a little different to me than the typical Eldredgeops. Maybe Dechenella lucasensis? I didn't realize how poor the photo quality was until I cropped it. I can take more photos under the scope if necessary. Silica Shale, middle Devonian (Givetian), Paulding, Ohio. Scale in cm/mm. This one seemed different as well.
  4. Nautiloid camera?

    Is this what I think it is? A camera steinkern of an orthoconic nautiloid? This is from the middle-Devonian Silica Shale of Paulding, Ohio (although because it is quarry spoil, there is a possibility it could be the underlying Dundee Limestone). I don't think I've ever found an orthocone in the Silica Shale, let alone one this large. I hope this is not something that has been intentionally or unintentionally salted in from another site... That really burns me up.
  5. Great day in Paulding, Ohio

    First trip of the year today to the "Fossil Gardens" at Paulding, Ohio. This is quarry spoil of mid-Devonian age, Silica Formation. There was not a cloud in the sky, and temps were relatively warm at 43 deg. F. I was the only one there for most of the day, and it was extremely peaceful. What a great day. Here are pics of some of the finds. These are "farm fresh" and haven't even been washed yet, but I did take time to polish some horn corals and get some acetate peels (couldn't wait). A large Cystiphylloides rugose coral.
  6. IMG_0758.JPG

    It sometimes pays to look over favosite corals , I found this scolecodont jaw attached to the bottom of a large one , it's roughly 1mm in size, middle Devonian,Hungry Hollow mb, Arkona,Ontario. I donated it to the Arkona Lions Museum And Information Centre In Arkona, Ontario
  7. IMG_1033.JPG

    From the album Hungry Hollow Fossil Pictures

    Hyolithes aclis (Hall) Size 12.8 mm Length X 3.08 mm Width Mid Devonian Arkona formation in the South Pit at Hungry Hollow . Arkona,Ontario I collected this on a CCFMS club sanctioned field trip last year .
  8. IMG_1066.JPG

    From the album Hungry Hollow Fossil Pictures

    I found this jaw with several teeth on it, on a hash plate with an Icriodus michiganus n sp conodont plus an ostracod, there both less than 1mm in size, it's from the Arkona formation,Hungry Hollow, South Pit, its mid Devonian. I collected it last year on a CCFMS club sanctioned field trip .
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gerastos granulosus Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Morocco, probably Djebel Issoumour area , Atlas Mts. TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian (395 million years ago) Proetida is an order of trilobite that lived from the Ordovician to the Permian. It was the last order of trilobite to go extinct, finally dying out in the Permian extinction. These typically small trilobites resemble those of the order Ptychopariida, from which the new order Proetida was only recently separated in 1975 by Fortey and Owens. Like the order Phacopida, the proetids have exoskeletons that sometime have pits or small tubercles, especially on the glabella (middle portion of the head). Because of their resemblance to the Ptychopariida in some features, the proetids are included in the subclass Librostoma. Unlike the trilobites of the Phacopid suborder Phacopina, whose eyes are schizochroal, the proetids have the more common holochroal eyes. These eyes are characterized by close packing of biconvex lenses beneath a single corneal layer that covers all of the lenses. Each lens is generally hexagonal in outline and in direct contact with the others. They range in number from one to more than 15,000 per eye. Eyes are usually large, and because the individual lenses are hard to make out, they look smooth and sometimes bead-like. The thorax of proetids was made up of anywhere between 8–22 segments, but most commonly 10. Many also extend the backcorners of the headshield into so-called genal spines. These two features can aid in distinguishing proetids from some Phacopid trilobites in the suborder Phacopina, to which they can be very similar. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Proetida Family: †Proetidae Genus: †Gerastos Species: †granulosus
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gerastos granulosus Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Morocco, probably Djebel Issoumour area , Atlas Mts. TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian (395 million years ago) Proetida is an order of trilobite that lived from the Ordovician to the Permian. It was the last order of trilobite to go extinct, finally dying out in the Permian extinction. These typically small trilobites resemble those of the order Ptychopariida, from which the new order Proetida was only recently separated in 1975 by Fortey and Owens. Like the order Phacopida, the proetids have exoskeletons that sometime have pits or small tubercles, especially on the glabella (middle portion of the head). Because of their resemblance to the Ptychopariida in some features, the proetids are included in the subclass Librostoma. Unlike the trilobites of the Phacopid suborder Phacopina, whose eyes are schizochroal, the proetids have the more common holochroal eyes. These eyes are characterized by close packing of biconvex lenses beneath a single corneal layer that covers all of the lenses. Each lens is generally hexagonal in outline and in direct contact with the others. They range in number from one to more than 15,000 per eye. Eyes are usually large, and because the individual lenses are hard to make out, they look smooth and sometimes bead-like. The thorax of proetids was made up of anywhere between 8–22 segments, but most commonly 10. Many also extend the backcorners of the headshield into so-called genal spines. These two features can aid in distinguishing proetids from some Phacopid trilobites in the suborder Phacopina, to which they can be very similar. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Proetida Family: †Proetidae Genus: †Gerastos Species: †granulosus
  11. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gerastos granulosus Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Morocco, probably Djebel Issoumour area , Atlas Mts. TIME PERIOD: Middle Devonian (395 million years ago) Proetida is an order of trilobite that lived from the Ordovician to the Permian. It was the last order of trilobite to go extinct, finally dying out in the Permian extinction. These typically small trilobites resemble those of the order Ptychopariida, from which the new order Proetida was only recently separated in 1975 by Fortey and Owens. Like the order Phacopida, the proetids have exoskeletons that sometime have pits or small tubercles, especially on the glabella (middle portion of the head). Because of their resemblance to the Ptychopariida in some features, the proetids are included in the subclass Librostoma. Unlike the trilobites of the Phacopid suborder Phacopina, whose eyes are schizochroal, the proetids have the more common holochroal eyes. These eyes are characterized by close packing of biconvex lenses beneath a single corneal layer that covers all of the lenses. Each lens is generally hexagonal in outline and in direct contact with the others. They range in number from one to more than 15,000 per eye. Eyes are usually large, and because the individual lenses are hard to make out, they look smooth and sometimes bead-like. The thorax of proetids was made up of anywhere between 8–22 segments, but most commonly 10. Many also extend the backcorners of the headshield into so-called genal spines. These two features can aid in distinguishing proetids from some Phacopid trilobites in the suborder Phacopina, to which they can be very similar. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Proetida Family: †Proetidae Genus: †Gerastos Species: †granulosus
  12. Phacops Trilobite Fossil, Morocco a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phacops Trilobite Fossil Morocco Middle Devonian 393-383 million years ago Phacops is a genus of trilobites in the order Phacopida, family Phacopidae, that lived in Europe, northwestern Africa, North and South America and China from the Early until the very end of the Devonian, with a broader time range described from the Late Ordovician. It was a rounded animal, with a globose head and large eyes, and probably fed on detritus. Phacops is often found rolled up, a biological defense mechanism that is widespread among smaller trilobites but further perfected in this genus. Like in all sighted Phacopina, the eyes of Phacops are compounded of very large, separately set lenses without a common cornea (so called schizochroal eyes), and like almost all other Phacopina, the articulate mid-length part of the body (or thorax) in Phacops has 11 segments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Phacopidae Genus: †Phacops
  13. Phacops Trilobite Fossil, Morocco a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phacops Trilobite Fossil Morocco Middle Devonian 393-383 million years ago Phacops is a genus of trilobites in the order Phacopida, family Phacopidae, that lived in Europe, northwestern Africa, North and South America and China from the Early until the very end of the Devonian, with a broader time range described from the Late Ordovician. It was a rounded animal, with a globose head and large eyes, and probably fed on detritus. Phacops is often found rolled up, a biological defense mechanism that is widespread among smaller trilobites but further perfected in this genus. Like in all sighted Phacopina, the eyes of Phacops are compounded of very large, separately set lenses without a common cornea (so called schizochroal eyes), and like almost all other Phacopina, the articulate mid-length part of the body (or thorax) in Phacops has 11 segments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Phacopidae Genus: †Phacops
  14. From the album Fossildude's Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Fossils

    Phyllocarid Rhinocaris columbina . Single valve. Middle Devonian Windom Shale. Moscow Formation, Hamilton Group. Deep Springs Road Quarry, Lebanon, NY. Found on 11/30/2017, on a trip with Jeffrey P.

    © © 2017 Tim Jones

  15. Greenops sp.

    From the album Fossildude's Middle Devonian Hamilton Group Fossils

    Greenops sp. trilobite partial. More prep may reveal more if the cephalon is there. Middle Devonian Windom Shale. Moscow Formation, Hamilton Group. Deep Springs Road Quarry, Lebanon, NY. Found on 11/30/2017, in the presence of JeffreyP.

    © 2017 Tim Jones

  16. Patriaspirifer duodenaris (Hall 1843)

    Found as surface float on the scree pile at the Kashong exposure. Originally assigned to Delthyris, reassigned to Spirifer, Acrospirifer, and Patriaspirifer. Alternate spellings: P. duodenaris, P. duodenaria, P. duodenarius. Does not appear in Fossilworks or Wilson’s “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York”. Classification information from Fossilworks entry for Patriaspirifer genus. Reference: Linsley, D. M. Devonian Paleontology of New York. (1994) Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication 21. Hall, J. Palaeontology of New York v. 4. (1867) Fossilworks. http://fossilworks.org Yale Peabody Museum Collections website (http://peabody.yale.edu/collections/invertebrate-paleontology)
  17. Nucleocrinus powelli REIMANN, 1935

    Found as surface float at the bottom of the Windom exposure. Reference: Wilson, K. A. “Field Guide to the Devonian Fossils of New York” (2014). Paleontological Research Institution Special Publication No. 44.
  18. What is this?

    Last week i enjoyed my holiday in Belgium in the Ardennes. Too bad that the weather was sometimes not that good but all in all it was a nice and successful holiday. I spent one complete day in an old quarry near Resteigne, where you can find many different fossils. The layers belong to the Eifelium, Middle Devon. For example I found brachiopods, corals and some trilobite parts. I will post them in a few days. But I also found an interesting item which I cant identify ! Its about 2 cm long and in my eyes it looks strange Maybe a kind of crinoid?? Any help is welcome ! Thanks !
  19. More Mahantango oddities

    More rocks I split (again thank you to @Rocky Stoner for them) and I found a few of the first one, a type of bryzoan? Next I have two things I notice do on a rock that has a trilo cephalon on it. . The thinner bar I'm guessing is a burrow, but I don't know what the thick bar could be. Lastly a bivalve? Any ideas on its identity? I have a few of them.
  20. Canandaigua death assemblage

    From the album Canandaigua trilobites

    Lots of trilobite parts, a few mediospirifer sp's. Very busy. Fragile mudstone, difficult to split or remove matrix without destroying specimens.
  21. 20170705_082825.jpg

    From the album Canandaigua trilobites

    Several thoraces, two cephalons of Eldregeops Rana from what is probably the Smoke Creek Trilobite Bed of the Windom Shale. This sample comes from a creek on private land on the West shore of Canandaigua Lake in New York State Finger Lakes region
  22. Some finds from my Spring 2017 collecting season. Pictured specimens were collected in situ from the Hungry Hollow Mbr. of the Widder Fm. (Middle Devonian, Hamilton Group, Southwestern Ontario). Due to file size restrictions I'll split the posts by phylum. Graptolites (unprepped). These enigmatic creatures are undescribed from the Hungry Hollow Member.
  23. Some finds from my Spring 2017 collecting season. Pictured specimens were collected in situ from the Hungry Hollow Mbr. of the Widder Formation (Middle Devonian, Hamilton Group, Southwestern Ontario). Due to file size restrictions I'll split the posts by phylum. Prone Eldredgeops (unprepped). Specimen consolidated with 6:1 water to PVA solution in field. Reverse side later coated with Acryloid (Paraloid) B-72 to stabilize matrix. Prone Basidechenella (unprepped). Consolidated as above. Missing lateral border and genal spine on one side of cephalon. This genus' exoskeleton preserves painfully thin making it a pain in the pygidium to collect.
  24. Eldredgeops rana

    Eldredgeops rana. Collected on July 3rd, 2011. Smoke's Creek, Blasdell, NY. Middle Devonian (Givetian) Hamilton Group, Windom Shale, Smokes Creek Trilobite Bed
  25. Help Identify

    Hi Everyone. I have been fossil hunting since a child, mainly just ferns where I am from. However, I just moved to a new area in PA and am delighted to find a variety of sea life, mainly shells. However I was surprised to find this one. My first guess was a turtle shell? The picture here doesn't do it justice, but was the best I could do. There are plates in the top and sides, then the sides even tapper and have the look of turtles today.
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