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Found 179 results

  1. Early Ordovician fossils

    These are pretty rough fossils. I haven't found a decent specimen yet, but ive ran into a few of them the last few months. Most likely gasconade formation (earliest bed of Missouri Ordovician ) cephalopods are a guess but I'd like your opinion. Are they known in 480 million year old tropical seabeds? Im not familiar with the details. Give me the run down on these fellas.
  2. Central Missouri

    Found a few beautiful pieces in rocks dug up by the local water department.surface exposure is Gasconade dolomite so i assume these are actually late Cambrian. But im not sure how deep in the ground they came from. Either way. I love these rocks and thought I'd share them with you. A lot of the pictures are different angles of the same rock. But theres a few of a second rock. I think i found and cleaned 4 rocks. Just didnt get pictures of all of them. Hope you enjoy. Happy hunting.
  3. Found in a field in Southeast Missouri

    My boys found this rock containing what looks like multiple fossils to me. Just looking for any info I can give my boys. Doesn't need to be too detailed. Ages 6 to 11. Thanks!
  4. Hey All, I don't know if there is even enough of a fossil here to identify. I am nowhere near good enough to give a real good guess. First thought was either a small piece of a cephlapod or chiton. If it is a gastropod, it is a type that I have never found before. It was found on the side of a dry creek bed near Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in an Ordovician Formation. The remnant that remains measures 13mm wide by 15mm long. The bed the fossil remnant is laying is measures 24mm long. There is an indented type of division going horizontally across the fossil. It does not go all the way through to make the remnant two separates segments though (just an indentation type of division line). Other fossils in the same rock include gastropods, a brachiopod and what looks like a very worn rugose coral. If anyone can give me a probably identification, I would appreciate it.
  5. Bryozoa or something different?

    Hi All, I picked up this rock in my back yard a couple of days ago. I picked it up because I saw a couple cross sections of rugose coral and some fenestrate bryozoan fossil pieces. When looking at it later, I noticed this feature. I haven't found anything like this before. Is this just a different type of bryozoa? These little marks also look like some tiny Platycrinite crinoid pieces. This was found in Howell County, Missouri, USA. It came from the Ordovician Period. These lines measure approximately 23mm in length and measure approximately 0.79mm wide. The individual spots are oval in shape and measure approximately 0.38x0.79mm. I don't know if it shows well in the first image, but this feature appears to be in a fracture in the host rock. There is still some rock covering the feature in the fracture. Any assistance or direction that you can give me is greatly appreciated. Thanks for your time, Doug
  6. Tooth ID

    Found this on a sandbar in Mississippi River near St. Charles Missouri, after the main channel was dredged. Appears to be a tooth but not like a canine type tooth. I was thinking shark tooth, maybe a native american trade piece. Any help would be greatly appreciated in identifying it.
  7. Please help ID this little guy

    Hello folks. I'm back after an extended break. I've found some really cool fossils on my land in southern Missouri, Texas county, USA. Just a few miles south of cabool. A seasonal stream flows through my land exposing some cool finds, not to mention- the heavy rains are washing the topsoil away. From the hundreds of artifacts I've collected, this spot must have been an indigenous settlement. My best guess is that this item was in the hands of those early Americans. I can see why, this is my 2nd most favorite of the collection. Please help me identify what this is. Any help would be greatly appreciated. FYI, I have overcast skies at the moment and very limited internet access. These pics are the best I can do. Mm measurements are roughly 66mm x 38mm x 25mm
  8. This might be a subject that might have been discussed before. If it has, I am sorry. I was looking at a rock that I found that has multiple flat gastropods in the matrix. I noticed that some spiral clockwise and other spiral counter clockwise. I have done a little research on this and I am confused. Some sites talk about the different spiraling depends on whether it was north or south of the equator. Another site talks about one being a gastropod fossil and the other being a gastropod like fossil. This is not the case of a fossil and a mirrored imprint. Do I have two different species here or is it just a variation (similar to color variations on certain herps)?
  9. I am assuming that this feature is just geology, but I would like a second opinion on this if possible. My eyes do wonders at seeing what I want to see instead of what is actually there. Thank you. This was found in Douglas County, Missouri, USA in the Roubidoux Formation. The feature in question measures 84x31mm. The host rock is 20x12.5cm. It was found near a seasonal creek bed where gastropods, rugose coral and crinoids have been found. Numerous trace fossils have been found in the area also. Thank you for your time and help.
  10. I am really trying to learn my common invertebrate fossils. Can someone, once again, confirm my tenative identification, or correct me? I really appreciate it. The fossil in question is this oval fossil. After doing some research my guess is it is a crinoid of some sort. I am guessing that the little "nipple" in the center of the oval is where the normal hole is, but why does it have a line disecting the oval into two distinct parts? If it is not a crinoid, can someone please tell me what I am looking at, and where I went wrong on my identification? Thanks, Doug
  11. Missouri Cambrian

    Just wanted to share this lovely old shell i had the pleasure of luck to find. It has been identified as taneospira emenensis from the eminence formation of Missouri upper Cambrian. I hope you enjoy seeing it. Happy hunting.
  12. Once again, I am studying and working on my own identifications. I am just needing someone to either confirm or correct me on this one. My first guess when I saw it was it was a gastropod of some sort, but after researching and looking at images online, my guess is that it is an internal cast of a hyolith. It was found in northwest Howell County, Missouri, USA. The fossil in question measures approximately 16mm and the host rock measures 80mm across. The widest point across of the cavity where the fossil in question lies is 8mm. Once again, I am truly appreciative of any help that you are willing to give me. Doug
  13. First point, I cannot get a decent image of this fossil to save my life. That being said, I took a bunch of sub par image in hopes someone can put the pieces together to come up with an id. It measures approximately 35x22mm and is definitely a different material than the host rock. I found it in the same area that I have been finding all of my other fossils. This is outside Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. I originally thought it might be a rugose coral of some sort, but it looks to have horizontal segments or something similar. I am about 95% (or more) positive that it is a fossil and not just geology. I will continue working on attempting to get better images. If I do, I will add them to the thread. Thank you for your assistance.
  14. Crystalized fossil or a pipe dream?

    I have a rock feature that I am a bit doubtful, but hopeful about. I have a few "crystalized" fossils and have seen some very nice ones from near my hunting area also posted. This does mean that there are some out there. This little feature measures almost 11mm long and is 6mm wide. In hand, the left side really looks like a head segment of some sort with the line and what does look like two eye spots. The main area has what looks like segment end features going around the sides. The square crystal feature in the center is a totally new one for me. I have found literally hundreds, if not thousands of crystal specimens (mostly in the quartz family) and have never seen anything like this. This rock has several other fossil and fossil imprints in it. There are cephlapod fossils, rugose coral fossils, and other features that I am still researching. Researching and using the state geological map, it was found in a late ordovician period area. It was found outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. My hopes are that it is a trilobite fossil of some sort or an isopod fossil. I am NOT getting my hopes up real high though.
  15. Hi everyone, I found a rock that has multiple small gastropod fossils and gastropod impressions in it. When looking at it a little closer, I saw this grouping of three fossils. Two are gastropods, but I am unsure of the third. Is it also a gastropod that still has the host rock over it where it has not eroded or is it something different? The scale is in millimeters. This was found outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA and is a surface find in disturbed soil. Once again, thank you for taking the time to help a rookie learn. I appreciate it. Doug
  16. Hi All, Why am I not finding any trilobites (or even any identifiable trilobite partials)? I know the obvious two answers would be that I am either overlooking them or I am hunting in an area that they will not be located in. I am hunting outside of Willow Springs, Missouri, USA in what I believe to be Ordovician Period rock. I am finding all sorts of crinoid, brachiopod, gastropod, bryozoa, rugose, favistella fossils and more. I have even found a large stromatolite reef but I cannot find a trilobite fossil. I would think with the diversity of the fossils that I am finding, trilobite fossils (pieces, partials or whole) would show up at least once. The trilobite is THE bucket list fossil for me and if I need to change my method of searching or my area of searching I want to do that. Virtually all of the fossils that I am finding are "field walking" finds. I either find them in seasonal creek beds, areas of erosion or areas where dirt and rock have been removed or disturbed, if that makes any difference. Thanks for your time and any advice that you can give me.
  17. Is this an Orthocone Cephalopod?

    Hi all, I have been working pretty hard to learn and identify my fossils as I collect them. I have one that I need confirmation on. I believe that it is an Orthocone Cephalopod but if someone can either confirm this or tell me what it is if I am wrong, I would appreciate it. This was found near Willow Springs, Missouri, USA. If my studying is correct, it should be from the Ordovician Period and from the Jefferson City/Cotter Formations. It measures a little over 57 mm long and at the widest point measures 22 mm across. The attached image is horrible. I cannot get any decent images with the lighting that I am using tonight. If it isn't good enough, I will take better images tomorrow. Thank you for your time and assistance. Doug
  18. crinoid ?

  19. crinoid & ?

    found this today on my land in Missouri. crinoid on left and something else on the right??
  20. bone or tooth?

    Hello. I spent a few hours looking around my land outside of Cabool, MO. I found some fossils, but first- is this anything cool?
  21. yesterdays finds

    Hello again. I found these yesterday. The clam is a dead giveaway(correct?), and the one on the top left is a coral, I'm guessing. What about the rest? Any help would be great. You see, I'm a carpenter. If it were a piece of dimensional lumber, I could ID it by smell and feel alone. hahaha
  22. Please ID this

    Hello from the heart of the salem plateau. I bought 20 acres outside of Cabool, MO. The plot has a few deep cuts exposing a lot of marine fossils, minerals, and such. This specimen doesn't look like anything I've seen thus far. Please help me ID this guy. Thanks and Season's Greetings.
  23. Hi All I found this rock earlier today and was surprised with what I saw. There is what might possibly be three different fossils in it. If anyone can please tell me if these are fossils, geology or a mix, I would appreciate it. This rock was found near Willow Springs, MO. A - Measures 8mm on the longest side. B - Measures from side to side approximately 19mm. It doesn't show up well in the image, but there are five total sections in an almost fan shape. Is this crinoid stem impressions or something different? C - This one is one that I am guessing might not be a fossil. These little "lines" remind me of tiny bones in their appearance. On average, they measure 3mm long and about 0.33mm in diameter. If anyone can shed any light on any of these areas of interest in this rock, I would greatly appreciate it. Doug
  24. Here is another very recent discovery in the dry creek bed. It appears to be some sort of fish fin to my very amateur eyes. Can someone please confirm this or tell me what it is if I am wrong? Although it is not clear in the images, the markings go all the way to almost the 12:00 position. It is not a stain and does not wash off. There is a crystal vein right above it that runs completely through the rock. Thank you for your time. This was found outside of Willow Springs, Howell County, Missouri, USA
  25. Quartz Snail (Gastropod) Fossil?

    It's been a while since I have been on here. Life got in the way of me looking for rocks and fossils. The property that I have access to hunt in has several seasonal creeks on it. This was found in a dry creek bed. I didn't think a lot about it as these type of "snail" fossils are the main thing that I find. When looking at it closer at home, I realized that the fossil itself seems to be replaced with quartz? The surface has been worn down by weathering and by the creek flow during the spring. I am not sure that the images convey the crystal properly, but the clear, crystal structure is there. Is this a common thing in fossils? It is the first that I have found. It was found outside of Willow Springs, Howell County, Missouri, USA and measures 21mm. There is a second "snail" still encased in the rock. The part that is visible is also quartz.
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