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Found 782 results

  1. Eldredgeops Rana

    From the album Western NY Fossil Hunts

    Eldredgeops rana trilobite with Stereolasma rectum horn coral (Before prep). Devonian Hamburg, NY Found 2019
  2. Penn Dixie stuff

    Hello everyone! I'm here once again to ask for some identification help as I continue to work on my fossil area display. Today I have a few items from Penn Dixie (Hamburg, NY, mid-Devonian) for you to look at. But before I show the photos, I was wondering about the formation that we find fossils in at Penn Dixie - is it all Moscow Formation? Okay, now on to the photos... Specimen #1: A Platyceras gastropod, but I'm not sure of the species: Specimen #2: A horn coral on the same rock as the Platyceras - is it Stereolasma rectum or Amplexiphylum hamiltoniae? Specimen #3: I've posted this one before, asking if it was a goniatite or a gastropod, but I'm starting to think it's a gastropod with some of the middle missing - perhaps Naticonema lineata or Euomphalus laxus? Specimen #4: A brachiopod and horn coral on the same rock as the goniatite/gastropod specimen - is the brachiopod Athyris spiriferoides? And is the horn coral Stereolasma rectum or Amplexiphylum hamiltoniae? Specimen #5: An unknown piece of something on the same rock as the goniatite/gastropod and the brachiopod - any ideas? Thanks in advance! Monica
  3. Bryozoa Horta

    Bryozoa Horta Found - July 23, 2019 Name - Atactotoechus fruticosus Age - Middle Devonian Formation - Moscow, Kashong mbr. Locality - Livingston County, New York, USA Size - 8" x 5" Complete and unprepared. I find these colonies at only one locality here in NY. The majority of the Bryozoa colonies are branching and I have reassembled many over the years (pic included of a typical branching specimen). This is the first unbranching Atactotoechus specimen I found lying on the seafloor like a blob or a Star Trek Horta (in my eye anyway ). The specimen was found in life position on top of a mat of fenestrate bryozoan. A very rare find for me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  4. NY Devonian Invertebrate

    What the heck? At first I thought this was maybe a cephalopod cross-section, but now I only have guesses. It's about 20mm in diameter. Found in a Skaneatles FM (Middle Devonain) outcrop in Madison County, NY
  5. Oyster

  6. Cole Hill Invertebrates

    I went with the Delaware Valley Paleontological Society to a few spots in Central New York last month. Cole Hill Rd. in Hubbardsville has several outcrops on private land where the owners are willing to share with fossil hunters. We scrabbled up and down the scree - Whee- and found our fill of trilo-bits, including one Dipleura cephalon covered with druse calcite, plus oodles of brachiopods, nautiloids, straight-shelled cephalopods, gastropods of all different shapes, and bivalves. I learned a tough lesson that afternoon. Always wrap your specimens as you go. Not only will they keep from breaking, but they are easier to find when your bucket tips and tumbles down the hillside across countless tons of scree There were lots of pained faces around me as I hunted down the things I'd already found.. It took me half an hour to recover everything I could, but the best ones managed to make it home. Dilpeura trilobite cephalon Another trilobite cephalon, found by someone else in the group. This one is covered in sparkling calcite. Crinoid holdfast? with Ptomatis rudis gastropod unknown, probably nautiloid Cornellites fasculata bivalve Palaeozygopleura sp. misc. unknown brachiopods If anyone has any ideas, I'd like to hear them. This spine-shaped object is about 6 inches long. I'd discount it as variations in the rock color, but the left end is curved outward from the matrix. Worm trace fossil. They made carpets of these on the sea floor.
  7. July 23,2019 Its been so hot working outside all week that today's fossil hunt in 70 degree temps felt cool. It was quiet in the stream (besides the sound of wildlife) when I got there in the AM and stayed that way all day. I didnt want to disturb the scene with me pounding on rocks so I surface collected and covered a large area of the stream. Along the sides of the stream are glacial erratic boulders, stones, and gravel. The tabulate corals (Chonostegites clappi, Favosites winchelli, Favosites sp.) I pictured in this post were found among these glacial rocks. In one gully off the stream I noticed a large boulder of Waterlime. I have found parts of Eurypterids in these displaced Silurian rocks before. Today I found a partial Eurypterid on one of these boulders but had to leave it where I found it. Too big and way too far to haul back. Happy Collecting, Mikeymig
  8. Attached to a large Megastrophia brachiopd, this is one of the best Aulopora coral colony I have ever found. A before and after prep photo from 2014 - 7/2019.
  9. I have been looking for places to find Paleozoic fossil nearby and New York seems to have a great amount of them, including the trilobites mentioned above, eurypterids, cephalopods brachiopods and all of those lovely invertebrates. I wanted to visit Penn Dixie later this month but got a good opportunity to do so this week, so now I have some time opened up that I would like to spend exploring other sites in NY. The only problem with this is that I have not found many places where I could do so, I have heard of Deep Springs road and another site that has a lot of triarthrus trilobites but these are private and would likely not be accessible to me. Are there any sites our members here would recommend? I would love some Dipleuras and Triarthrus but am interested in many other Paleozoic invertebrates as well. Thank you very much, Misha.
  10. Monday was an extremely nice one weather wise. I took advantage and visited a small private quarry near Morrisville in Central New York. I've been to this site several times in the past, but the last trip was roughly a year ago. The quarry exposes the Mottville Member of the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation. It is part of the Marcellus Shale which represents the bottom of the Hamilton Group. In terms of fauna it has similarities with the nearby Deep Springs Road and Briggs Road quarry sites which are younger in age. There are also notable differences.
  11. Rare Heliophyllum Delicatum. This is coral found only in the thin Moscow formation and only in Upstate New York. Mid Devonian and still in its living condition!
  12. Devonian finds

    Here are a few finds from my first trip to Penn Dixie not sure exactly what these are. The first is a spiriferid brachiopod but I would like to confirm that what is on it is a crinoid holdfast or is it something else?
  13. ID references for Eurypterids

    Hello all! I'm looking for recommendations on good resources to help me identify a ton of material that I recently acquired from the Sojka eurypterid collection. I believe it is all from the Bertie Waterlime, but I can't be entirely sure. Some of the pieces have collection numbers, but I don't have access to the collection records. I am guessing that any of the collection records went with the rest of the collection to the Yale Peabody, but I can't imagine that I would honestly be able to match up the information without a lot of time and access. There's a lot of assorted material and lots of bits and pieces to ID. I figure that this will give me a good opportunity to learn a ton about a new subject! Thanks! - J
  14. Hey everyone!! So I posted last week (sorry had the wrong link there for a minute!) - but my mom found some interesting things in our creek and it was suggested they might be nautiloid fragments! So obviously we went back to look for more. We found a ton of rocks that are similar. I think a lot of what we found might just be concretions but here are a few that seemed interesting to me and I'd love another opinion on! They all have some sort of hole/dimple which I'm not sure is something that occurs in concretions? If it helps - they were all found in the creek bed in Groveland, Livingston County, NY and a geologist friend said she believes the rock on the creek bed appears to be shale slate. I'm at work without a ruler right now, so I had to use the Mary Anning post card I have on my desk for scale haha. It is 6 inches (15.24 cm). I promise I'll get a ruler soon if I'm gonna keep asking for help!! Thanks in advance!!
  15. Tim (Fossildude19) and I got together Monday the 1st for the third time this year to head up to Central New York, an over three and a half hour trip from Southeastern New York where I live. The weather was bright, sunny, and warm in sharp contrast with our last trip there in early May for the TFF gathering when it was cold and raining. Instead of going straight to Deep Springs Road Quarry, both our favorite collecting site, we decided to stop first at Briggs Road Quarry, a somewhat smaller quarry with a slightly older Middle Devonian marine fauna- the Upper Ludlowville Formation. Some excellent fossils have been found there recently and Tim and I decided we would try our luck. As typical of my experiences there we found a large number of partial Eldredgeops trilobites. I believe Tim found one complete roller. I brought this one piece back with a few partials. However, my best find there was this phyllocarid; Echinocaris punctata, the first phyllocarid I ever found at Briggs Road.
  16. Devonian Cephalopod

    I found this yesterday in Avoca, New York. It's about 3 cm long. The core looks like a cephalopod of some kind, but the exterior has me puzzled. If it were soft tissue, it wouldn't have preserved, but I have found impressions of a few others like this there and in another site over an hour away. The one field guide I have shows nothing like it and I may have to go hunt down the original 19th century sources. Any clues?
  17. Hello fossil folks Just another one of those “Rediscovering New York” posts. This Edition will include my efforts looking for the Trenton group and exploring the Pulaski formation. More Ordovician exploration in the central New York area. This past Saturday me and my good friend Matt did some trout fishing in the Rome area and another town north of Rome. I had scouted these spots for 2 reasons.....trout and trilobites! One location seemed to have Trenton group exposures and another I had already confirmed as the Pulaski formation but wanted to explore it more. Both were located on stretches of the Mohawk River and anyone can go fish/hike these waters. I learned of another Trenton group exposure with trilobites but it’s posted trespassing. Eventually Ill get the courage to do some door knocking in the area to try and find the owners. I guess I don’t know what I would say lol. I wasn’t really in the mood for that so I went to legal stretches of the Mohawk River for this adventure. The goal: 1. Find Trenton group exposures 2. Confirm trilobites from the Pulaski formation 3. Catch trout!!! More to follow....
  18. Unknown Silurian Fossil

    Hi guys!!! Going through material from our last trip and wondering if anyone can help ID this? Assuming fossil and not mineral... If you look closely there are smaller segments of it around the obvious area in question. As always, any feedback appreciated!
  19. Smokes Creek

    Hello all, New to the site, used it as a resource for years, but have too many questions to ask at this point so here's my first. Making a visit to Western New York to do some hunting, have been to Penn Dixie plenty of times and was looking to do something that may require a little more looking. I was looking through places in the area that may be of interest on here and Smokes Creek came up somewhat often. I see that it runs through a lot of the area of Western New York and was curious as to what would be the best way to access the creek without bothering anyone along the way. Thanks for the help in advance, hittingthebeds
  20. Removed from a stream boulder, this Greenops like pygidium is larger than most complete Devonian trilobites from NY. Im not sure to what the exact species is so Im just calling it Greenops like. The age is Middle Devonian from Livingston County, New York. This could have been a near 5 inch bug if complete. Based on the dimensions of the largest complete Greenops sp. I have found in the collected area. From near spine tip to spine tip wide - 2.3" (58.50mm) Around 1.6" - 1.7" long (42mm)
  21. Last year I got a call from my friend Gary. I have collected with him a few times and I have volunteered to help him with educational activities that he runs for middle and high schoolers many times over the years. He was wondering if I could go on a paid dig with him to a quarry near Rome, NY famous for triarthrus trilobites with soft tissues preserved. The deal was we each pay a fixed price, but we get to keep up to five trilobites each. Prepping could be provided for an additional fee. Other fossils we find were free to keep, but the dig owner reserved the right to keep exceptionally large or rare finds. After finding out more about the quarry and realizing it was home to the "gold bugs" I committed to go. It took about 3 or 4 months before Gary, the quarry owner and I finally were able to coordinate an open date to go, but that just made the anticipation build even more. We drove the 260 miles and met up in a pre-arranged parking lot. The quarry owner is a famous fossil hunter and now makes his living purely finding, prepping, buying and selling fossils. Despite that he has donated many prize fossils to museums and universities including new species and has been included on several academic papers such as this one. We'll call him Mr. M. (M for mysterious) We got to the quarry and unloaded our tools. Mr. M was a fountain of information about trilobites. The history of the quarry is fascinating all by itself as well. A quick Google of Beecher's trilobite beds will give you plenty of additional data about the place and the history behind it. This is the section that Walcott dug in before he later discovered the Burgess Shale. So, after a quick geology lesson we got to work. Gary found a beautiful example within 5 Minutes of starting, and he was up to about 4 before I found my first one 3 hour later. But I had paid the blood price to the fossil gods with the sharp shale. So I was rewarded with trilobites!!! I have a lot more to show, but it will have to wait for later.
  22. Strange fossils in chert found in NY

    Hi, I was driving along the NY State Thruway recently and stopped at several roadcuts in Devonian limestones. I picked up a big chunk of chert that had interesting fossils in it. I think they are crinoid column segments seen edge-on and end-on, but I'm not sure. They are all encased in chert and they are not CaCO3 (they don't fizz in HCl). Does anyone have any other ideas? Thanks for any help, Bob
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