Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'pennsylvanian period'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 87 results

  1. Sphenopteris fern A.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sphenopteris fern Sphenopteris fern Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Sphenopteris is a genus of seed ferns containing the foliage of various extinct plants, ranging from the Devonian to Late Cretaceous. The frond of Sphenopteris could be up to 20 inches (51 cm) long. Kingdom: Plantae Division: †Pteridospermatophyta Class: †Lyginopteridopsida Order: †Lyginopteridales Family: †Lyginopteridaceae Genus: †Sphenopteris
  2. Pecopteris fern

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris fern Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: †Pecopteris
  3. Eusphenopteris fern

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eusphenopteris fern Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Pteridosperms or seed ferns are a group of extinct plants with mostly fern-like foliage but having real seeds. They were mostly small trees but other forms that exhibited climbing growth have been found. Some forms, notably those called the Medullosales as seen here had large fronds which could be up several meters long. Several groups can be distinguished within the Pteridosperms. The Pteridosperms evolved in the latest Devonian, and became common in the Carboniferous. The Medullosales took over the leading role during the Westphalian and persisted into the Permian. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Cycadophyta Class: Cycadopsida Order: †Medullosales Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Eusphenopteris
  4. Eusphenopteris fern

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Eusphenopteris fern Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Pteridosperms or seed ferns are a group of extinct plants with mostly fern-like foliage but having real seeds. They were mostly small trees but other forms that exhibited climbing growth have been found. Some forms, notably those called the Medullosales as seen here had large fronds which could be up several meters long. Several groups can be distinguished within the Pteridosperms. The Pteridosperms evolved in the latest Devonian, and became common in the Carboniferous. The Medullosales took over the leading role during the Westphalian and persisted into the Permian. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Cycadophyta Class: Cycadopsida Order: †Medullosales Family: †Medullosaceae Genus: †Eusphenopteris
  5. Alethopteris fern.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Alethopteris fern Eastern Kentucky, USA Pennsylvanian Period (~ 330 million years ago) Alethopteris is a prehistoric plant genus of fossil Pteridospermatophyta (seed ferns) that existed in the Carboniferous period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). It is in the family Alethopteridaceae. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: †Pteridospermatophyta Order: †Medullosales Family: †Alethopteridaceae Genus: †Alethopteris
  6. Neuropteris sp

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Neuropteris Leaf Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Neuropteris is an extinct seed fern that existed in the Carboniferous period, known only from fossils. Major species include Neuropteris loschi. It is a fairly common fossil in bituminous coal with Alethopteris and similar ferns, especially in the Carboniferous Alleghany Mountains of Pennsylvania, they can be found near St. Clair, Pennsylvania. One common leaf fossil found during the Carboniferous was once called Neuropteris scheuchzeri. In 1989, it was reclassified as Macroneuropteris scheuchzeri. This specimen looks like Neuropteris loschi Kingdom: Plantae Division: †Pteridospermatophyta Order: †Medullosales Family: †Neurodontopteridaceae Genus: †Neuropteris
  7. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  8. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  9. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  10. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  11. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  12. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photos 1, 2 and 3 show obverse; photo 4 reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  13. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  14. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  15. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  16. Calamites sp.

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites *Note: Photo 1 & 2 show obverse; photo 3 shows reverse. Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  17. Calamites

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  18. Calamites

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  19. Calamites

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamites Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. Further organ genera belonging to sphenophytes include: (1) Arthropitys (stems which are preserved in a mineralised form (2) Astromyelon (permineralised rhizomes, distinguished from Arthropitys by the absence of a carinal canal) (3) Annularia and Asterophylites (form genera of leaf-whorls which are paraphyletic). This is possibly Calamites suckowi. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  20. Artisia fossil

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  21. Artisia fossil

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  22. Artisia fossil

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Artisia fossil Rt 56 Bypass, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian Period (290-330 Million Years Ago) Artisia - the pith cast of Cordaites. In The Fossil Flora of Great Britain, or figures and descriptions of the vegetable remains found in a fossil state in this country - John Lindley, Wlliam Hutton, Volume III, 1837 were described similar ones as Sternbergia. Sternbergia angulosa Artis Antedil. phytol. t. 8. and Sternbergia approximata Ad. Brongn. Prodr. p. 137. " When the integuaient of coal is broken off, these plants are sometimes found simply marked by horizontal depressed lines, which meet alternately from opposite sides anastomozing in the middle ; but in other cases the space between the lines is excavated into deep furrows, and honey-combed as it were by the formation of short perpendicular bars which connect the lines ; traces also may be found of lines running along the sides of the stem for a considerable distance. The result of this is that many stems appear as if they were composed of horizontal plates, about l-16th of an inch apart and held together by some connection in the axis of the stem : a most extraordinary appearance, to which we know of no parallel, and which we are by no means prepared to say is their real structure. " Cordaites is an important genus of extinct gymnosperms which grew on wet ground similar to the Everglades in Florida. Kingdom: Plantae Division: Pinophyta Class: Pinopsida Order: Cordaitales Family: Cordaitaceae Genus: Cordaites
  23. It was VERY warm for February in Pennsylvania - So, a few minutes walk from my home, I went for some fossils. It rained once I got there, so I did NOT get to the "best" sport, but I did manage to get these and a few more! I am wondering... What is the best way to clean them? And any recommendations to "stabilize" them? The slate can be a bit brittle. Clear spray shellac-type material? Thanks for looking! This area has neuropteris, pecopteriss, calamites, sigillaria, lepidodendron, ginko leaves and all the other usual suspects! Hoping for more warm days... And I think we will have them!
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ptychocarpus unitus, with partial Alethopteris Upper Sharp Mountain Mbr-Pottsville Formation of Pennsylvania Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago) This Ptychocarpus unitus measures 2" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 3/4" by 3 1/4". There's a nice partial Alethopteris on the reverse side. Alethopteris is a prehistoric plant genus of fossil Pteridospermatophyta (seed ferns) that existed in the Carboniferous period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). It is in the family Alethopteridaceae. Kingdom: Plantae/Plantae Division: Tracheophyta/†Pteridospermatophyta Order: Marattiales/†Medullosales Family: Marattiaceae/ †Alethopteridaceae Genus: Ptychocarpus/†Alethopteris Species: unitas/sp.
  25. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ptychocarpus unitus, with partial Alethopteris Upper Sharp Mountain Mbr-Pottsville Formation of Pennsylvania Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago) This Ptychocarpus unitus measures 2" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 3/4" by 3 1/4". There's a nice partial Alethopteris on the reverse side. Alethopteris is a prehistoric plant genus of fossil Pteridospermatophyta (seed ferns) that existed in the Carboniferous period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). It is in the family Alethopteridaceae. Kingdom: Plantae/Plantae Division: Tracheophyta/†Pteridospermatophyta Order: Marattiales/†Medullosales Family: Marattiaceae/ †Alethopteridaceae Genus: Ptychocarpus/†Alethopteris Species: unitas/sp.
×