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Found 87 results

  1. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ptychocarpus unitus, with partial Alethopteris Upper Sharp Mountain Mbr-Pottsville Formation of Pennsylvania Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago) This Ptychocarpus unitus measures 2" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 3/4" by 3 1/4". There's a nice partial Alethopteris on the reverse side. Alethopteris is a prehistoric plant genus of fossil Pteridospermatophyta (seed ferns) that existed in the Carboniferous period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). It is in the family Alethopteridaceae. Kingdom: Plantae/Plantae Division: Tracheophyta/†Pteridospermatophyta Order: Marattiales/†Medullosales Family: Marattiaceae/ †Alethopteridaceae Genus: Ptychocarpus/†Alethopteris Species: unitas/sp.
  2. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ptychocarpus unitus, with partial Alethopteris Upper Sharp Mountain Mbr-Pottsville Formation of Pennsylvania Pennsylvanian Period (323.2 million years ago to 298.9 million years ago) This Ptychocarpus unitus measures 2" long and is on a matrix measuring 1 3/4" by 3 1/4". There's a nice partial Alethopteris on the reverse side. Alethopteris is a prehistoric plant genus of fossil Pteridospermatophyta (seed ferns) that existed in the Carboniferous period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). It is in the family Alethopteridaceae. Kingdom: Plantae/Plantae Division: Tracheophyta/†Pteridospermatophyta Order: Marattiales/†Medullosales Family: Marattiaceae/ †Alethopteridaceae Genus: Ptychocarpus/†Alethopteris Species: unitas/sp.
  3. Wewokella Sponge Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Wewokella Sponge Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastland County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Order Octactinellida - The spicules consist of eight rays, six of which are in one plane diverging at equal angles, while the other two are at right angles to this plane, forming a vertical axis. Frequently, however, the vertical axis is only slightly developed or altogether absent. The spicules are not united. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Porifera Class: †Heteractinida Order: †Octactinellida Family: †Wewokellidae Genus: †Wewokella
  4. Wewokella Sponge Fossil a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Wewokella Sponge Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastland County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Order Octactinellida - The spicules consist of eight rays, six of which are in one plane diverging at equal angles, while the other two are at right angles to this plane, forming a vertical axis. Frequently, however, the vertical axis is only slightly developed or altogether absent. The spicules are not united. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Porifera Class: †Heteractinida Order: †Octactinellida Family: †Wewokellidae Genus: †Wewokella
  5. Crinoid stem with side arm.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid stem with side arm SITE LOCATION: Harpersville Formation, Coleman County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: A crinoid stem in matrix, with other stem sections. Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  6. Lophophyllidium spinosum Coral a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lophophyllidium spinosum Coral SITE LOCATION: Stephens County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Lophophyllidium is a genus (sometimes made the type of a family Lophophyllidiidae) of tetracorals common and widely distributed in central North American Upper Carboniferous formations. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Lophophyllidiidae Genus: †Lophophyllidium Species: †spinosum
  7. Lophophyllidium spinosum Coral a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lophophyllidium spinosum Coral SITE LOCATION: Stephens County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Lophophyllidium is a genus (sometimes made the type of a family Lophophyllidiidae) of tetracorals common and widely distributed in central North American Upper Carboniferous formations. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Order: †Stauriida Family: †Lophophyllidiidae Genus: †Lophophyllidium Species: †spinosum
  8. Crinoid spine.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Crinoid spine SITE LOCATION: Harpersville formation, Coleman County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Crinoids are marine animals that make up the class Crinoidea of the echinoderms (phylum Echinodermata). The name comes from the Greek word krinon, "a lily", and eidos, "form". They live in both shallow water and in depths as great as 9,000 meters (30,000 ft). Those crinoids which in their adult form are attached to the sea bottom by a stalk are commonly called sea lilies. The unstalked forms are called feather stars or comatulids. Crinoids are characterised by a mouth on the top surface that is surrounded by feeding arms. They have a U-shaped gut, and their anus is located next to the mouth. Although the basic echinoderm pattern of fivefold symmetry can be recognised, most crinoids have many more than five arms. Crinoids usually have a stem used to attach themselves to a substrate, but many live attached only as juveniles and become free-swimming as adults. There are only about 600 extant crinoid species, but they were much more abundant and diverse in the past. Some thick limestone beds dating to the mid- to late-Paleozoic are almost entirely made up of disarticulated crinoid fragments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Cridoidea
  9. Trepospira gastropod.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Trepospira gastropod SITE LOCATION: Cisco, Texas TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Trepospira, extinct genus of gastropods (snails) found as fossils in rocks of Devonian to Late Carboniferous age (between 286 and 408 million years old). Its shell has a low spire, and the length of the coiling axis is short relative to the shell’s width. The shell is smooth but is ornamented by nodules next to the sutures between the whorls. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Pleurotomariida Family: †Gosseletinidae Genus: †Trepospira
  10. Worthenia tabulata gastropod.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Worthenia tabulata gastropod SITE LOCATION: Texas TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Worthenia is a genus of fossil sea snails, an extinct marine gastropod genus found in the fossil record. This genus is primarily found in rocks formed during the Devonian to Triassic periods (416 million to 200 million years ago) from the central areas of North America. Worthenia was named for the paleontologist Amos Henry Worthen who lived 1813 - 1888. Worthenia species have a "turban-shaped shell in which a raised ridge follows the margin of the whorls. Small nodes occur along the ridge, and the opening of the shell is oval and large." Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Murchisoniina Family: †Lophospiridae Genus: †Worthenia Species: †tabulata
  11. Euphemites gastropod.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Euphemites gastropod SITE LOCATION: Stephens County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Euphemites, extinct genus of gastropods (snails) abundant during the Late Carboniferous Period (between 320 and 286 million years ago) in the shallow seas that covered the midcontinental region of North America. Euphemites was a small, globular snail with a broad and arcuate (bow-shaped) aperture. Ornamentation consists of parallel ridges separated by troughs following the plane of coiling. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: †Bellerophontida Family: †Euphemitidae Genus: †Euphemites
  12. Fissispongia Sponge Fossil.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fissispongia Sponge Fossil SITE LOCATION: Wise County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: Agelasida is an order of demosponges in the subclass Heteroscleromorpha. Sponges, the members of the phylum Porifera (meaning "pore bearer"), are the sister of the ParaHoxozoa or Epitheliozoa with which they form a basal animal clade, the Parazoa. The other basal animal clade are the Ctenophora. They are multicellular parazoan organisms that have bodies full of pores and channels allowing water to circulate through them, consisting of jelly-like mesohyl sandwiched between two thin layers of cells. Sponges have unspecialized cells that can transform into other types and that often migrate between the main cell layers and the mesohyl in the process. Sponges do not have nervous, digestive or circulatory systems. Instead, most rely on maintaining a constant water flow through their bodies to obtain food and oxygen and to remove wastes. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Porifera Class: Demospongea Order: Agelasida Family: †Fissispongiidae Genus: †Fissispongia
  13. Rhynchopora Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rhynchopora Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Graford, Palo Pinto County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Rhynchoporidae Genus: †Rhynchopora
  14. Rhynchopora Brachiopod a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rhynchopora Brachiopod SITE LOCATION: Graford, Palo Pinto County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Pennsylvanian Period (299-323 Million Years ago) Data: The taxonomic order Rhynchonellida is one of the two main groups of living articulate brachiopods, the other being the order Terebratulida. They are recognized by their strongly ribbed wedge-shaped or nut-like shells, and the very short hinge line. The hinges come to a point, a superficial resemblance to many (phylogenetically unrelated) bivalve mollusk shells. The loss of the hinge line was an important evolutionary innovation, rhynchonellids being the first truly non-strophic shells with a purely internal articulation (teeth-sockets). Strong radiating ribs are common in this group; and there are generally very strong plications or accordion-like folds on the sulcus (the long middle section) of the shell. This probably helps regulate the flow of water in and out of the shell. All rhynchonellids are biconvex (have a bulbous shell), and have a fold located in the brachial valve. This means that the commissure, the line between the two valves or shells, is zigzagged, a distinguishing characteristic of this group. The prominent beak of the pedicle valve usually overlaps that of the brachial valve, in order to allow the shell to open and close. There is usually a functional pedicle although the delthyrium may be partially closed. Morphologically, the rhynchonellid has changed little since its appearance during the Ordovician period. It seems to have evolved from pentamerids, and in turn gave rise to the first atrypids and athyrids, both of which are characterized by the development of a complex spiral brachidium. Although much diminished by the terminal Paleozoic extinction, it experienced a revival during the Early Jurassic period, and became the most abundant of all brachiopods during the Mesozoic Era. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: Rhynchonellida Family: †Rhynchoporidae Genus: †Rhynchopora
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  16. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  17. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  18. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Lepidodendron Fossil SITE LOCATION: Eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (307-331 Million Yeas Ago) Lepidodendron — also known as scale tree — is an extinct genus of primitive, vascular, arborescent (tree-like) plant related to the lycopsids (club mosses). They were part of the coal forest flora. They sometimes reached heights of over 30 metres (100 ft), and the trunks were often over 1 m (3.3 ft) in diameter. They thrived during the Carboniferous Period (about 359.2 ± 2.5 Mya (million years ago) to about 299.0 ± 0.8 Mya) before going extinct. Sometimes erroneously called "giant club mosses", they were actually more closely related to today's quillworts than to modern club mosses. The name Lepidodendron comes from the Greek lepido, scale, and dendron, tree. By the Mesozoic era, the giant lycopsids had died out and were replaced by conifers as well as smaller Quillworts. This may have been the result of competition from the emerging woody gymnosperms. Lepidodendron is one of the more common plant fossils found in Pennsylvanian (Late Carboniferous) age rocks. They are closely related to other extinct Lycopsid genera, Sigillaria and Lepidendropsis. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Lycopodiophyta Class: Isoetopsida Order: †Lepidodendrales Family: †Lepidodendraceae Genus: †Lepidodendron
  19. 3-D CALAMITES a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamite Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (330 million years ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  20. 3-D CALAMITES a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calamite Tree Fossil SITE LOCATION: eastern Kentucky TIME PERIOD: Carboniferous, Pennsylvanian Period (330 million years ago) Data: Calamites is a genus of extinct arborescent (tree-like) horsetails to which the modern horsetails (genus Equisetum) are closely related. Unlike their herbaceous modern cousins, these plants were medium-sized trees, growing to heights of more than 30 meters (100 feet). They were components of the understories of coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period (around 360 to 300 million years ago). A number of organ taxa have been identified as part of a united organism, which has inherited the name Calamites in popular culture. Calamites correctly refers only to casts of the stem of Carboniferous/Permian sphenophytes, and as such is a form genus of little taxonomic value. There are two forms of casts, which can give mistaken impressions of the organisms. The most common is an internal cast of the hollow (or pith-filled) void in the centre of the trunk. This can cause some confusion: firstly, it must be remembered that a fossil was probably surrounded with 4-5 times its width in (unpreserved) vascular tissue, so the organisms were much wider than the internal casts preserved. Further, the fossil gets narrower as it attaches to a rhizoid, a place where one would expect there to be the highest concentration of vascular tissue (as this is where the peak transport occurs). However, because the fossil is a cast, the narrowing in fact represents a constriction of the cavity, into which vascular tubes encroach as they widen. The trunks of Calamites had a distinctive segmented, bamboo-like appearance and vertical ribbing. The branches, leaves and cones were all borne in whorls. The leaves were needle-shaped, with up to 25 per whorl. Their trunks produced secondary xylem, meaning they were made of wood. The vascular cambium of Calamites was unifacial, producing secondary xylem towards the stem center, but not secondary phloem. The stems of modern horsetails are typically hollow or contain numerous elongated air-filled sacs. Calamites was similar in that its trunk and stems were hollow, like wooden tubes. When these trunks buckled and broke, they could fill with sediment. This is the reason pith casts of the inside of Calamites stems are so common as fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: †Calamitaceae Genus: †Calamites
  21. Pectopteris 004.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossils Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  22. Pectopteris 004.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Pecopteris Fern Fossils Ferndale area of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, USA Pennsylvanian - 323.2 -298.9 million years ago Fern leaves called Pecopteris grew abundantly in the coal swamps of the Carboniferous Period. These leaves dropped off of a 35 foot fern tree called “Psaronius“, one of the most common Paleozoic types. With its sparse and expansive branches, it resembled the modern day palm tree. It produced as many as 7000 spores on the underside of its leaves. These samples are well preserved in gray coal shale as many Carboniferous leaf fossils. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophtya (meaning vascular plant with transport system for nutrients and fluids) Class: Filicopsida (Ferns which reproduce with spores) Order: Marattiales (primitive ferns) Family: Marattiaceae Genus: Pecopteris
  23. Fossil Roadshow

    If you don't usually consult the calendar you might miss a chance to talk online to fossil collectors from North Texas this coming Thursday at 6:00 PM Central time. It's the My Fossil Webinar patterned after the Antiques Roadshow where we present a fossil we found and the expert tells all about it. The expert on this case is Dr. Merlyn Nestell of the University of Texas at Arlington. By connecting with the link provided on the My Fossil site anyone can participate by asking a question of the presenter or the expert in real time. If you miss the broadcast it will appear on line a few days later. I will be presenting along with three other members of the Dallas Paleontological Society.
  24. Fossil Roadshow Webinar

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    The second My Fossil "Fossil Roadshow" patterned after the Antiques Roadshow will be hosted by the Dallas Paleontological Society and broadcast from the University of Texas at Arlington with Dr. Merlyn Nestell appearing as the fossil expert. Three other collectors and myself will bring fossils we have found in North Texas Pennsylvanian sites for Dr. Nestell to explain and anyone can participate online by connecting with the link provided on the website below. https://www.myfossil.org/event/fossil-roadshow-webinar-2-pennsylvanian-fossils-of-north-texas/
  25. I got to visit a site today that isn't often open for collecting and found over 250 crinoid columns for the kids. The longest was 75mm and the biggest around was 17mm. This piece of shark cartilage may be a gill arch section. This crinoid cup has a lot of articulated plates for North Texas and I find even fewer of these arms. This is the first example of a gastropod in the Platyceratidae Family I've found. Platyceras parvum.
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