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  1. Scotese, C.R., Song, H., Mills, B.J. and van der Meer, D.G., 2021. Phanerozoic paleotemperatures: The earth’s changing climate during the last 540 million years. Earth-Science Reviews, no.103503. PDF from Academia PDF from Researchgate Abstract from Elsevier More papers (PDFs) from Christopher Scotese Yours, Paul H.
  2. Praefectus

    Schellwienella sp.

    Fossil brachiopod Schellwienella sp. EDIT: Updated pictures and stratigraphic information.
  3. Praefectus

    Diaphragmus cestriensis

    Fossil Brachiopod Diaphragmus cestriensis EDIT: Updated pictures and stratigraphic information.
  4. Praefectus

    Otodus sokolovi

    L1: 7.6 cm L2: 6.2 cm W: 6.0 cm
  5. Praefectus

    Tyrannosaur Tooth

    Premaxillary tooth EDIT: Changed from Tyrannosaurus rex to Tyrannosaurid indet.
  6. Praefectus

    Indeterminate Tyrannosaur

    Dimensions: CH = 41 mm CWB = 10 mm CBL = 16 mm MC = 18 denticles/5 mm DC = 14 denticles/5 mm DSDI = 1.29
  7. A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record, Santa Fe Institute, June 26, 2019 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190626160341.htm http://www.terradaily.com/reports/A_new_normal_Study_explains_universal_pattern_in_fossil_record_999.html https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-06/sfi-ann061919.php The paper is: Rominger, A.J., Fuentes, M.A. and Marquet, P.A., 2019. Nonequilibrium evolution of volatility in origination and extinction explains fat-tailed fluctuations in Phanerozoic biodiversity. Sci
  8. Fantastic paper for any who haven't seen it yet. No paywall . https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14772019.2017.1412362
  9. Fossil algae reveal 500 million years of climate change November 28, 2018, Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research https://phys.org/news/2018-11-fossil-algae-reveal-million-years.html The paper is: Caitlyn R. Witkowski, Johan W. H. Weijers, Brian Blais, Stefan Schouten, and Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté. 2018. Molecular fossils from phytoplankton reveal secular PCO2 trend over the Phanerozoic Science Advances. Vol. 4, no. 11, eaat4556 http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/4/11/eaat4556 Yours, Paul H.
  10. Pseudogygites

    Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni.
  11. Pseudogygites

    Triarthrus eatoni

    Included in multi plate alongside eight other complete or near complete T. eatoni. Found in association with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, Brachiopods, Cephalopods, and Graptolites. The Cephalon is slightly disarticulated, likely from molting.
  12. Pseudogygites

    Triarthrus eatoni

    Found associated with T. rougensis, T. spinosus, brachiopods, cephalopods, and graptolites. Included in multi plate alongside three other T. eatoni and one T. rougensis. Both eyes are preserved.
  13. Pseudogygites

    Triarthrus rougensis

    Both genal spines are present. Right side of cephalon is slightly pyritized. Found associated with T. spinosus, T. eatoni, cephalopods, and graptolites.
  14. Pseudogygites

    A Fossilized Thing

    Hi again! I’m totally stumped with this one. The rock is limestone, so its not the Billings formation. There is still some matrix on it, but most of the surface is exposed. It’s spherical and slightly faceted. Fossil pearl?
  15. Pseudogygites

    Triarthrus finds

    Hello again! This post will be about some beautifully preserved Triarthrus fossils (and my first complete Trilobite finds). Some of them even have the eyes preserved! I found these at a local train station, and the site of significant construction lately. I believe most of the to be E. eotoni, and the last one to be E. rougensis or spinosus. It may not be visible in the picture, but the last one has a streak of pyrite along the side of its cephalon / upper thorax. Could this be some kind of soft body tissue preservation, similar to those of the Beecher's Trilobite bed?
  16. Pseudogygites

    Ordovician Road Cut

    Yesterday, I was lucky enough to attend a very special field trip with the Eastern Ontario Natural History Society to a massive road cut in Ontario. The rock exposed was Ordovician aged limestone, and it produced some amazing fossils. I might need some id help with some of these. The giant cephalopod was by far the best thing I found! 1. Giant Cephalopod (with hand for scale) Camerocerad or Endoceras? 2. Crinoid stems, bryozoans and Gastropod 3. Partial trilobite pygidia
  17. Pseudogygites

    Isotelus

    I found this last month on a visit to an abandoned limestone quarry near Naponee, Ontario. Though I am not very familiar with the Trilobites of this area, I believe it's an Isotelus. If I'm wrong with this identification, please tell me. It looks like there could be more of it underneath the sediment, and there is some matrix covering the pleura. This limestone is flaky and darker than any I have seen before. How would I go about prepping this? Though I've heard many people use sand, should I use something less abrasive, like baking soda? Thanks for the help.
  18. Pseudogygites

    Fossil ID

    This may or may not actually be a fossil. It is a cylindrical, shimmering white streak on the Shale. It is only about an inch long. This may just be another mineral inclusion, or some discoloured sediment. Any help with identifying this would be appreciated!
  19. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 7, 2018.
  20. Hello TFF members! I have just found several strange circular rocks on a fossil hunt a few minutes ago, which I believe to be either nodules or concretions. What should I do to split these rocks? I know that I should probably not try to break them with a hammer and chisel, and instead use the freeze-thaw process. This is my first experience with nodules or concretions, so I am not very knowledgeable on this topic. Is there a specific recommended length of time I should leave them in the cold? How long should I thaw them for? How many times should I put them through the process before seeing cr
  21. Pseudogygites

    Agnostid?

    I found this fossil a few days ago at an exposure of the Billings Shale. It was found associated with Triarthrus glabellas and brachiopods. It's structure leads me to believe that it's either an Isotelus pygidium or an agnostid, although I do not know of any agnostics described in this formation and age.
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