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Found 623 results

  1. Mastodon or Mammoth toe bone?

    Hi again , I found this in the peace river in Nocatee , FL Looks like I found leg bone to something , It's approximately 8" (200mm) one end is 5" (127mm) wide and the other is 4" (100mm) wide in the middle it's diameter is the size of a large male wrist . Weighs 1050 grams . What you think ?
  2. Fossil plants provide clues to changing environments in Tennessee’s past. The Erwin record, April 11, 2020 https://www.erwinrecord.net/community-news/fossil-plants-provide-clues-to-changing-environments-in-tennessees-past/ Some random papers. Gong, F., Karsai, I. and Liu, Y.S.C., 2010. Vitis seeds (Vitaceae) from the late Neogene Gray fossil site, northeastern Tennessee, USA. Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology, 162(1), pp.71-83. https://dc.etsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=0%2C19&q=Gray+Fossil+Site&btnG=&httpsredir=1&article=3171&context=etd Shunk, A.A.J., 2009. Late Tertiary paleoclimate and stratigraphy of the Gray Fossil Site (eastern TN) and Pipe Creek Sinkhole (northcentral IN) (Doctoral dissertation) Baylor Unversity, Waco, TX https://baylor-ir.tdl.org/handle/2104/5303 Shunk, A.J., Driese, S.G. and Dunbar, J.A., 2009. Late Tertiary paleoclimatic interpretation from lacustrine rhythmites in the Gray Fossil Site, northeastern Tennessee, USA. Journal of Paleolimnology, 42(1), pp.11-24. https://www.academia.edu/11963313/Late_Tertiary_paleoclimatic_interpretation_from_lacustrine_rhythmites_in_the_Gray_Fossil_Site_northeastern_Tennessee_USA https://www.academia.edu/23862396/Late_Tertiary_paleoclimatic_interpretation_from_lacustrine_rhythmites_in_the_Gray_Fossil_Site_northeastern_Tennessee_USA Whitelaw, J.L., Mickus, K., Whitelaw, M.J. and Nave, J., 2008. High-resolution gravity study of the Gray Fossil S ite. Geophysics, 73(2), pp.B25-B32. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/249865308_High-resolution_gravity_study_of_the_Gray_Fossil_Site https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Kevin_Mickus/2 Worobiec, E., Liu, Y.S.C. and Zavada, M.S., 2013. Palaeoenvironment of late Neogene lacustrine sediments at the Gray Fossil Site, Tennessee, USA. In Annales Societatis Geologorum Poloniae (Vol. 83, No. 1, pp. 51-63). https://geojournals.pgi.gov.pl/asgp/article/viewFile/12589/11062 https://geojournals.pgi.gov.pl/asgp/article/view/12589 Zobaa, M.K., Zavada, M.S., Whitelaw, M.J., Shunk, A.J. and Oboh-Ikuenobe, F.E., 2011. Palynology and palynofacies analyses of the Gray Fossil Site, eastern Tennessee: their role in understanding the basin-fill history. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 308(3-4), pp.433-444. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Michael_Zavada/publication/277307790_Palynology_of_the_Gray_Fossil_Site_eastern_Tennessee_its_role_in_understanding_the_basin_fill_history/links/562905a908ae518e347c704b.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  3. Vokesinotus lamellosus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Vokesinotus lamellosus (Emmons, 1858) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Emmons (1958) first described Fusus lamellosus from the Miocene (now Pliocene) of North Carolina and Dall (1890) described Coralliophaga lepidotus from the Pliocene (now Lower Pleistocene) of Florida. Olsson & Harbinson (1953) figured Trophon lepidotus from the Caloosahatchee Formation, however Campbell (1993) listed Urosalpinx lepidotus in the Pliocene of Florida, North Carolina and Virginia overlooking lamellosus entirely. Those shells in the Caloosahatchee have a lower spire than the predominate shells in the Tamiami although some with lower spire heights can be found. For this reason I have chosen V. lamellosus as the high spired species and V. vokesinotus with the lower spire height. If both are the same, the proper name would V. lamellosus with V. lepidotus as a junior synonym by 32 years.
  4. Vokesinotus lepidotus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Vokesinotus lepidotus (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar to V. perrugata except ribs flare out forming winged varices.
  5. Vokesinotus perrugatus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Vokesinotus perrugatus (Conrad, 1837) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Spoil, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: No varices but ribs with delicate scale structure on spirals and interspaces.
  6. Trossulasalpinx  hertwecki

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Trossulasalpinx hertwecki (Petuch, 1991) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: T. hertwecki is common in the Pinecrest. It has a similar texture to T. subsidus, but with sharp angular ribs.
  7. Trossulasalpinx subsidus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Trossulasalpinx subsidus (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: T. subsidus is rare in the Tamiami. Well preserved specimens have spirals with a granular texture.
  8. Trossulasalpinx curtus

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Trossulasalpinx curtus (Dall, 1890) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: T. curtus is not noted in many museum databases. This shell fits most closely to Dall's original description.
  9. Eupleura brevispira

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Eupleura brevispira Mansfield, 1930 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: APAC Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: The most distinguishing characteristic is the upwards pointing varicies.
  10. Eupleura metae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Eupleura metae Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Taller in profile than some of the other Pliocene Eupleura species. A flaring varix surrounds the aperture rim.
  11. Eupleura calusa

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Eupleura calusa Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Quality Aggregates Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Similar profile to E. intermedia, however with two flaring varicies and a recurved siphonal canal.
  12. Eupleura intermedia

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Eupleura intermedia Dall, 1890 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Low varicies, short profile and straight siphonal canal.
  13. Eupleura sulcidentata

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Eupleura sulcidentata Dall, 1890 Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Spoil, Collier County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Long recurved siphonal canal. Two strong varices opposite of each other gives this shell a flattened profile.
  14. Eupelura tampaensis

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Eupleura tampaensis (Conrad, 1846) Statigraphy: Golden Gate Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: Bonita Grande Pit, Lee County, Florida USA. Status: Extant Notes: Strong spiral cords give this shell a reticulated appearance.
  15. Pterorytis roxanae

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Pterorytis roxanae Petuch, 1994 Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: High shoulder triangular in shape. P. roxanae lacks the labrial tooth that is found in the other two species within this genus.
  16. Pterorytis fluviana

    From the album Gastropods of the Tamiami Formation

    Order Neogastropoda Family Muricidae Pterorytis fluviana (Dall, 1903) Statigraphy: Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation Location: SMR Phase 10 Pit, Sarasota County, Florida USA. Status: Extinct Notes: Geographically widespread species in the Upper Pliocene and Lower Pleistocene of the Southeastern US, ranging from Virginia to Florida. Pterorytis conradi from the Lee Creek Mine, Aurora, North Carolina is a junior synonym of this species.
  17. Hi all, I had a fairly productive first outing to Westmoreland State Park but I have no idea what any of the fossils I found are. I am happy to provide close-ups of any of the individual fossils, and in addition to the photos here, I posted some to imgur to get around the size restriction here. https://imgur.com/gallery/2uIedQS Thanks for your help!
  18. Pliocene Gastropod fossils

    Found these in a large deposit near road cutaway.
  19. Hello all, I recently returned from Peace River with a few finds, including this 15 mm fossil. I believe it's a small herbivore tooth, but I'm new here so would greatly appreciate help on the ID. Thanks!
  20. More Horse of Course?

    Found by my buddy on a river gravel bar/bank in southern Minnesota. As I've stated in some previous posts the geology in our area is upper Cretaceous. However, the river where this specimen was found pulse floods and is like a giant gravel mixer. In the past and more recently Pleistocene fossils have been found in the river gravel deposits in my area (mammoth, bison, etc). It general it is very difficult to age by geology/context. I'm hoping ancient horse but more sets of eyes on it are better. What do you think and thanks!? Any thoughts on age? Ancient horse or not?
  21. Hey everyone! This will be my first attempt at a trade in the TFF. Im offering a variety of fossils from the Price Creek Formation of Humboldt County, Northern California. This formation has been dated to late Miocene early Pliocene. As far as to what I’m looking for in this trade, I love all things Mollusca! Gastropods, Bivalves, Ammonites, Belemnites or Brachiopods, I’ll take them all. Invertebrates of any kind will strike my fancy though. The weirder the better. I’ve seen some Ram’s Horn Oysters that are awesome! I have no qualms about trading for these as a whole set, however shipping would be cheaper. I’m willing to ship anywhere in the United States, if your international I’m afraid that you’ll have to absorb that cost. I really appreciate all the knowledge that members have been forthcoming with sharing. Please pm me if your interested. -Nick
  22. Hello all Up for trade is this Chilean Carcharodon carcharias. It was found in the Huarra formation, near Antofagasta. The tooth is just over 2 inch measured on the longest side. I want to trade this for trilobites, dinosaur, Crocodile or other reptile stuff, Kem Kem material, insects, fossil fish or something surprising. Unfortunately, I will not be able to send this piece untill the quarantine in my country is lifted.
  23. Last one from the Peace River! There’s three ridges where my finger is pointing.
  24. Peace River, Florida bone find

    Another stumper! This one has a sheen to it that doesn’t show up well in the photos. I try to show all sides. It’s cubed in shape.
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