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Found 14 results

  1. ThePhysicist

    Bitten Dimetrodon spine

    From the album: Permian

    Dimetrodon spines have a unique shape: ^ Brink et al. (2019) Many bones in the matrix I have appear to have bite marks - parallel grooves in bone. My amateur guess is that these are scavenging marks from a Dimetrodon carcass that got washed into a river and got chomped by Xenacanthid sharks (there certainly are other possibilities).
  2. ThePhysicist

    Helodus

    From the album: Permian

    A freshwater cartilaginous fish with crushing teeth.
  3. ThePhysicist

    Xenacanthid denticles

    From the album: Permian

    The "sharks" that swam the rivers and lakes of the Early Permian wouldn't be fun to pet!
  4. ThePhysicist

    Mystery tooth

    From the album: Permian

    I'm convinced it's a tooth, but not sure what kind. More images here.
  5. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon Tooth

    Identification: This tooth was found in processed microfossil matrix from Waurika, OK, USA. Reptile remains in general are very uncommon, so if you think you've found many pieces of Dimetrodon teeth, you're likely mistaking many Orthacanth shark cusps. Orthacanth shark enamel is smooth, and the serrations are quite prominent compared to those on Dimetrodon which are finer. Dimetrodon enamel is not smooth, as seen on this one. Dimetrodon crowns are also broader. Shark cusps broken at the foot of the crown also flare out, where reptile teeth do not. Were this crown complete, you would also not
  6. ThePhysicist

    cf. Dimetrodon grandis

    From the album: Permian

    Now how can this crumb of a tooth be attributed to Dimetrodon?? First, it's serrated. It could be shark? The enamel is not smooth (not very visible in this image, a little at the bottom), so no (additionally, the serration shape is different from those of Orthacanth sharks). That narrows it down to serrated Synapsids. It turns out that very few animals at this time and location had "true" serrations, not just enamel serrations, but bumps in the dentine beneath the enamel. The enamel on this piece happens to still be clear, allowing one to see the globular dentine underneath! From B
  7. ThePhysicist

    Dimetrodon tooth

    From the album: Permian

    Dimetrodon sp. Wellington/Ryan Fm., Waurika, OK, USA Post-canine/posterior tooth This tooth is likely from D. limbatus, given the locality and presence of serrations: https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms4269 The same paper also rules out other serrated Sphenacodonts by the enamel ornamentation. Its smaller size could indicate that it's from a juvenile. It differs from the comparatively abundant broken Orthacanth shark tooth cusps in the microfossil matrix (what most people are likely to confuse with): the enamel texture is not smooth, the c
  8. ThePhysicist

    Permian fossils

    Hey y'all! Need help with some Permian material. 1. Thought it was Xenacanth shark, but it looks odd to me (~ 3 mm): 2. Think it's a fish spine (~ 3 mm): 3. No idea; a tooth of some kind (~ 1 mm):
  9. hokietech96

    ID Help

    Hi. Found this tooth in Ryan formation matrix from Waurika OK. I found this tooth that looks to me to be from a shark, but does not match any teeth from this locality. It is about 3MM. Is it a shark tooth or something else. Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated!
  10. paleo.nath

    Dimetrodon tooth?

    I’ve just found this tooth in some Permian micro matrix from the Wellington formation, it is serrated and around a centimeter long. I’m thinking It’s dimetrodon or some sort of other basal synapsid
  11. paleo.nath

    Permian fossil help

    I’m sorting through some micro-matrix that is said to be from the “Ryan Formation” however I’m pretty sure that’s just the Wellington formation. I’m looking for some sort of ID on this, It’s about a half centimeter long. My apologies for the poor photo quality, It’s just so tiny and my equipment isn’t good enough
  12. I’ve been trying to research and go through previous posts all morning, but I still need help. Can this be confirmed as a Dimetrodon tooth or just as Sphenacodontidae? The seller states that it’s from the Ryan formation and found near Waurika, Oklahoma. It appears to be around 1/4 inch long. I know the photos aren’t the best, but all of the sellers photos are pretty terrible. I can definitely see serrations on the tooth. If anyone can help shed some light on this for me I would appreciate it. I know @Bobby Rico has a slight obsession with Dimetrodons, so maybe he can weigh in.
  13. GeschWhat

    Fish spine in Permian Poo?

    I have been going through a group of tiny coprolites from the Ryan Formation, Waurika, OK. Most of the inclusion I have come across are fish scales. Can anyone identify this ribbed bone? My first thought was part of a fish spine. Thanks in advance for your help!
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