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Found 159 results

  1. I was reading a book about fossil fishes and there was a chapter dedicated to sharks and their cousins. Apparently there were chondricthyan scales found in the Late Ordovician and Early Silurian rocks. Since I hunt the Late Ordovician Georgian Bay formation in Toronto, Ontario and various Early Silurian formations in Hamilton, Ontario, what are the chances of me coming across these scales? Should I keep my eyes open and what should I look for?
  2. Sorry this is my first time in Morocco and I’ve never fossil hunted abroad if possible could any1 tell me what the teeth are (apart from the mosasaur one) and if the 2nd photo is a fossil or not
  3. Freely available from the Smithsonian online. https://scholarlypress.si.edu/store/new-releases/geology-and-vertebrate-paleontology-calvert-cliffs/
  4. Shark Vert from Ramanessin Brook, N.J.

    From the album Cretaceous

    Shark Vertebra Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Ramanessin Brook Holmdel, N.J.
  5. New Jersey Modern Sharks

    Hey everyone, I recently walked on a beach near Keansburg, New Jersey, and came across an unusually large amount of dead animals. There were mostly crabs (blue crabs and spider crabs), baby shells, and jellyfish lying on the beach. However, I came across three small sharks. Does anyone know what factors might be responsible for the dead animals, such as rising water temperatures? If anyone knows what type of shark (I believe it is the smooth dogfish, Mustelus canis) and jellyfish that is, please comment. Thanks everyone, Joseph Jellyfish: Shark #1 body (with a fish behind it) Shark #1 dentition: Shark #2 remains: Shark #2 dentition:
  6. Does anyone know where I can find on the web a chart or table that lists shark species versus geologic time? I have searched but just can't find one. It would also be helpful if the table would show lineage as is presently believed to be accurate. Thanks!
  7. Help Identify Shark Teeth

    Hi everyone! I am new here. I found many shark teeth this past weekend in the Venice Florida beach area. I was able to identify all but these five teeth. Can anyone help me? I had not been to look for shark teeth since I was a kid and had forgotten how cool it was! I am hooked now and I want to go to the Peace River and the Carolina beaches to look for some Megaladon teeth! Thank you so much for any help you can give me! Jodi :-)
  8. Sharks Vertebras

    I received these vertebras form a lady that lives in Colonial Beach, Va. and close to George Washington's Birthplace. I was told they are sharks vertebras but I am doubtful. Can someone identify them? I'll post the other vertebrae in the next post.
  9. Best Teeth of the Month

    Hi everyone! I've had quite the month here in Wilmington, NC. After some recent dredging, I've been scouring the beach (often multiple times a day) for any good finds. As far as beach hunting goes, this is by far the most productive month I have ever had, with some of my all-time best teeth coming out of Wilmington. I'm really excited to share some of my finds with you guys. The teeth pictured are only the best ones found from April 20th to May 20th, 2018. There are many more not pictured that did not "make the cut". If anyone has information about any of my teeth or would like an alternate angle of a particular tooth, please reach out! Happy Hunting
  10. Cretaceous Shark Teeth from Big Brook, N.J.

    From the album Cretaceous

    (left) Scapanorhychus texanus (goblin shark tooth) (middle) Cretolamna appendiculata (mackerel shark tooth) (right) Squalicorax sp. (crow shark tooth) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattawan Group Big Brook Colt's Neck, New Jersey The Squalicorax is the largest I've ever found, though frankh1847 found an even larger one the same day.
  11. Shark teeth ID

    I have these shark tooth fossils which I purchased for about $5 in Florida. I tried my best to group them according to appearance, but I'm not sure how well I did. They all need IDs.
  12. awesom 11,3 Mb I just received a postcard from my retinae:"enjoying the Bahamas,won't be back anytime soon,you &*&(((()_+&@W" "And you may tell yourself :"This is not my beautiful fossil""
  13. Hey all, im posting this in hopes some of you shark folks may be able to help me out. I have a shark tooth in a concretion from the west coast. I have decided im going to prep this one myself and leave a backing of matrix on the ventral side of the tooth. So my question is, is it possible to tell the ventral/dorsal from what little is exposed already. This is probably a carcharodon sp. tooth but i really wont be sure until i am able to prep it. I have compared this tooth to some megs and white shark teeth i have in my collection and im kind of leaning in one direction already but i really don't know that much about shark teeth so i would be interested to hear other opinions. I took some photos and added A and B as to distinguish the sides. Any ideas or advice is much appreciated. Nick
  14. White sharks teeth fossils?

    Every now and then on the forum someone posts a cream colored meg, or some other type of white sharks tooth. I just thought it was cool and moved on, but after finding two white sharks teeth myself (one below) I started to wonder how this could be. I extremely doubt it’s the original enamel, though I’ve doubted true things before. Would this be because of a certain mineral? Perhaps plant acids, such as in lightning strikes? Just from wear? Are there multiple factors?
  15. Hey everyone, I was just wondering what exactly intermediate teeth were and also what the difference between symphyseal and parasymphyseal teeth is. The small fourth tooth in the upper jaw of Carcharias taurus is marked as an intermediate. Thanks for any help!
  16. Published today. https://www.livescience.com/61360-fossil-shark-megalodon-ancestor.html Cheers, SA2
  17. Added three new teeth in recent times to my collection of exotic meg teeth, I'd like to share since there,s not to many images from these localities out there, the photos maybe in shabby quality because I pulled them directly from my Instagram page to save time. 1) This partial tip of a meg was found in the Chiba prefecture of Japan! Acquiring this, even just a fragment was a real pain in the butt as megs from Japan are extremely scare. 2) Even though its not a Meg of course but still being the closest ancestor, this 3.1inch chubutensis tooth was found at a land site in Lecce, Italy with gorgeous color! 3) This tooth measuring 4.1 inches came from new site in Bangkalan City, Java, Indonesia. A majority of the megs here were found with absolutely terrible preservation so this one is one of the best out of the bunch! A few more pics of these teeth can be found on their posts on my page at https://www.instagram.com/nyislandfossils/ if its ok to post this here.
  18. Hi! I am just looking for some possible good fossil hunting sites anywhere in the South Florida area, preferably near Palm Beach County. I have never fossil hunted in this part of Florida. I have heard of a few lucky people on this forum who have found mammal material (i.e. Mammoth, Mastodon, Camel, Sloth e.t.c.). I will be staying at Eau Palm Beach for the week. I am looking for sites with these mammal fossils or just shark teeth and pleistocene shells. I'd also be willing to plan a group trip if there are any other members nearby! I am willing to drive any distance from Palm Beach to a good site. I hope to hear from you soon!
  19. Hunting locations

    Hey guys! I just moved down from Philly to Ponte Vedra and wanted to get started on the hunt down here. Any places, rivers, creeks, dredge fields, beaches and more that you would recommend for hunting? If you liked to meet up as well I'd be down! Let me know.
  20. Hi everyone! I am really interested in collecting vertebrate fossils. I have a lot of things to offer: - vertebrate fossils from Eocene of Kyiv, Ukraine and Albian-Cenomanian of Ukraine and Russia (various species of shark teeth, bony fish teeth, turtle shell fragments) - Pleistocene mammal, fish and turtle bones from Kyiv, Ukraine (unfortunately, I am not very good at identifying mammal species, but I have a large selection; mostly rodents or other small mammals, I have larger bones, but they are less complete) - crabs from Kyiv Eocene (Eocarpilius (?), up to 4 cm, not perfect, but with almost completely preserved caparaces and some appendages) - Silurian invertebrates from Podolia, Ukraine (mostly corals and small brachiopods) - also some small Devonian placoderms from Podolia, Ukraine (Kujdanowiaspis) - various Ukrainian and Russian ammonites and orthocerid or endocerid nautiloids - a lot of Miocene and Pliocene molluscs from Ukraine - some Carboniferous plants from eastern Ukraine - some random things, ask me if you are interested in something else In return, I am mostly interested in Paleozoic to Cretaceous shark and reptile fossils (both bones and teeth), especially in specimens from rare locations (especially Australia, don't have any vertebrates from there, and any Permian/Triassic vertebrates or dinosaurs/pterosaurs/marine reptiles from other periods). PM me if you are interested, please. I will send you the pictures of specimens you are most interested in. I also accept sales instead of trades. Here is an example of some Eocene fossils from Kyiv I have for trade (here are various sandsharks, Isurolamna, goblin Anomotodon, turtles, Carcharocles, Notorynchus, makos, Jaeckelotodus, Striatolamia, rays, chimaeras, bony fish, Physogaleus). I have much more specimens available, this is just an example.
  21. From the album Cretaceous

    Scapanorhynchus texanus (goblin shark lateral tooth) Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Mattewan Group Ramanessin Brook Holmdel, N.J.
  22. My beautiful wife scheduled a three night stay at a cabin in a Thousand Trails campground near Lake Texoma. We were to arrive on Sunday and check out on Wednesday. So, I figured that, since I hadn't been fossil hunting in months, I would schedule a trip to central Texas to follow the Texoma trip. I set up a rendezvous point in Fairfield, Texas to meet my dad on that Wednesday, and head off toward Brownwood and Cisco, Texas. I figured that the fossil hunt would begin then. But that's not quite how things played out... My two oldest daughters and I met my wife and youngest daughter in Salado, Texas on Saturday, October 14th. They had left the previous morning to spend a day with my mother-in-law in Waco and Salado. We spent Saturday night in Salado and then parted ways with my mother-in-law on Sunday morning and headed toward Lake Texoma. As we drove through Waco, my wife asked if we wanted to take a detour. She had never been to Dinosaur Valley State Park in Glen Rose, Texas, and she thought the girls would enjoy seeing the dinosaur tracks in the Paluxy River. I got really excited. I hadn't been there since I was a kid, and at that time, the river was high and the tracks were not visible. So we adjusted our GPS to take us to Glen Rose. We pulled in and stopped off to get a map of the park. We then drove straight to the spot where Roland T. Bird made his first discovery. It was amazing. The water was low and gave us a clear view of the trackways in the river. Above you can see both the sauropod and theropod tracks, They are a little obscured by mud, but they are still very visible. We left the R.T. Bird site and went to another place called the Ballroom Track Site, where so many tracks go in so many directions, it was like the theropods were dancing. It was in slightly deeper water, but it was still beautiful! The rippling water was crystal clear and the girls couldn't help but get into the water, even as a cool front brought chilly winds down the river valley. My wife loved it. She told me that Dinosaur Valley State Park was our next camping destination. Before we left, we stopped off by the iconic Tyrannosaurus Rex and Apatosaurus models built for the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York. They were permanently installed at Dinosaur Valley in 1970 at the park's dedication. We left Dinosaur Valley and drove the rest of the way to our cabin at Lake Texoma, arriving just after dark. We settled in and tried to decide what we wanted to do the next day. It was Monday, and we figured there had to be something for the girls to do nearby. We quickly discovered that our options were limited. It had turned too cold for the pool at the campgrounds. The putt-putt at the campground was okay, but the girls quickly tired of it. And most of the other recreational equipment was not well kept, or available. So, we decided to leave the campground to find something for the girls to do. I had mentioned that I would like to check out the Permian site at Waurika, Oklahoma. It was only two hours away, and this was the closest I had ever been to the site. My wife was a bit miffed by the lack of things for the girls to do, so she said "Let's go." I jumped at the chance. I had done no research on the site, other than what I had read about it on TFF. I wish I had consulted the TFF experts before we left, because I had no idea of the best places to look. We focused mainly on the sandy floor and reddish rocks, and found nothing. When we returned to the cabin, I asked where we should have looked. Jesuslover340 informed me that the gray colored exposures were the places to find the best material. So, we came away empty handed, with only one major discovery. My wife wouldn't let me take it home, though... Continued in next post...
  23. Pathological crown

    From the album Eocene vertebrates of Ukraine

    Pathological Striatolamia lateral crown
  24. Anomotodon sheppeyensis

    From the album Eocene vertebrates of Ukraine

    Second upper anterior, upper lateral and lower first lateral.
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