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Found 14 results

  1. Possibly Astrangia sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Astrangia sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Astrangia sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  2. Possibly Astrangia sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Astrangia sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Astrangia sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  3. possibly Solenastrea sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Solenastrea sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Solenastrea sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  4. possibly Solenastrea sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Solenastrea sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Solenastrea sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  5. Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago during the Devonian Period, bivalves really took off following the massive extinction at the close of the Permian Period. Modern bivalves live in a variety of marine and freshwater environments, from the shallow waters near shore to great depths in the ocean. Fossils indicate that bivalves have occupied most of these environments for more than 450 million years, but during the Paleozoic Era they were especially common in near-shore environments. The Veneridae or venerids, common name the venus clams, are a very large family of minute to large, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Over 500 living species of venerid bivalves are known, most of which are edible, and many of which are exploited as food sources. Many of the most important edible species are commonly known (in the USA) simply as "clams". Venerids make up a significant proportion of the world fishery of edible bivalves. The family includes some species that are important commercially, such as (in the USA) the hard clam or quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Veneridae Genus: Tapes Species: decepta
  6. Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Tapes decepta Mollusk Cast SITE LOCATION: Glen Rose Formation, Bandera County, Texas, USA TIME PERIOD: Lower Cretaceous (100-145 million years ago) Data: Clams and their relatives (oysters, scallops, and mussels) are often called bivalves (or bivalved mollusks) because their shell is composed of two parts called valves. Bivalves have a long history. Their fossils first appear in rocks that date to the middle of the Cambrian Period, about 510 million years ago. Although the group became increasingly abundant about 400 million years ago during the Devonian Period, bivalves really took off following the massive extinction at the close of the Permian Period. Modern bivalves live in a variety of marine and freshwater environments, from the shallow waters near shore to great depths in the ocean. Fossils indicate that bivalves have occupied most of these environments for more than 450 million years, but during the Paleozoic Era they were especially common in near-shore environments. The Veneridae or venerids, common name the venus clams, are a very large family of minute to large, saltwater clams, marine bivalve molluscs. Over 500 living species of venerid bivalves are known, most of which are edible, and many of which are exploited as food sources. Many of the most important edible species are commonly known (in the USA) simply as "clams". Venerids make up a significant proportion of the world fishery of edible bivalves. The family includes some species that are important commercially, such as (in the USA) the hard clam or quahog, Mercenaria mercenaria. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Veneroida Family: Veneridae Genus: Tapes Species: decepta
  7. Calymente tristani Trilobite.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calymene tristani Trilobite Jebel Issoumour, Alnif, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Age (444-486 Million Years Ago) Calymene (meaning beautiful crescent as a reference to the glabella) is a genus of trilobites in the order Phacopida that are found throughout North America, North Africa, and Europe in primarily Silurian outcrops. Calymene is closely related to Flexicalymene, and both genera are frequently found inrolled. Calymene trilobites are small, typically 2 cm in length. Their cephalon is the widest part of the animal, and the thorax is usually in 13 segments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Calymenidae Genus: †Calymene Species: †tristani
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastropod - Euomphalus planidorsatus Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Euomphalus is a genus of fossil marine gastropods known to have lived from the Silurian to the Middle Permian. Euomphalus is characterized by a closely coiled shell with a depressed to slightly elevated spire and a channel-bearing angulation (a selenizone) on the upper surface of the whorls. The lower surface of the whorls is rounded to angular. Amphiscapha, Philoxene, and Straparollus are among similar related genera. Serpulospira, also related, differs in having a broadly open spiral in the adult form. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Euomphaloidea Family: Euomphalidae Genus: †Euomphalus Species: †planidorsatus
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastropod - Euomphalus planidorsatus Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period (ca 325,000,000 years old) Euomphalus is a genus of fossil marine gastropods known to have lived from the Silurian to the Middle Permian. Euomphalus is characterized by a closely coiled shell with a depressed to slightly elevated spire and a channel-bearing angulation (a selenizone) on the upper surface of the whorls. The lower surface of the whorls is rounded to angular. Amphiscapha, Philoxene, and Straparollus are among similar related genera. Serpulospira, also related, differs in having a broadly open spiral in the adult form. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Euomphaloidea Family: Euomphalidae Genus: †Euomphalus Species: †planidorsatus
  10. Sea Urchin Fossil - Madagascar a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - Mepygurus depressus Madagascar Callovian stage of the Jurassic Era circa 144 to 208 million years ago This type of Sea Urchin, "Mepygurus depressus", like a (sand dollar), is an extremely flat form of echinoid. They are a slow moving creature, feeding primarily upon algae, as they burrow through the soft sand in our oceans. Sea Urchins have a rigid skeletal system, known as a test, which is comprised of several interlocking plates. On the top of their bodies are five visually paired rows of perforations of their endoskeleton, which are formed in a perfect star shaped pattern. These perforations act as a gas exchange system for the Sea Urchin. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Cassiduloida Family: Clypeidae Genus: Mepygurus Species: depressus
  11. Sea Urchin Fossil - Madagascar a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Sea Urchin Fossil - Mepygurus depressus Madagascar Callovian stage of the Jurassic Era circa 144 to 208 million years ago This type of Sea Urchin, "Mepygurus depressus", like a (sand dollar), is an extremely flat form of echinoid. They are a slow moving creature, feeding primarily upon algae, as they burrow through the soft sand in our oceans. Sea Urchins have a rigid skeletal system, known as a test, which is comprised of several interlocking plates. On the top of their bodies are five visually paired rows of perforations of their endoskeleton, which are formed in a perfect star shaped pattern. These perforations act as a gas exchange system for the Sea Urchin. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Echinodermata Class: Echinoidea Order: Cassiduloida Family: Clypeidae Genus: Mepygurus Species: depressus
  12. Annularia Fern Plant Leaf Fossil.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Annularia Fern Plant Leaf Fossil Mazon Creek Formation, Francis Creek Shale, Braidwood, Illinois Pennsylvanian, Upper Carboniferous - 300 million years ago Annularia is a plant fossil belonging to the order Equisetales. Annularia is a form taxon. It is the name given to Calamites leaves. In fact the stems and the radiating structures of the leaf whorls is similar in the Calamites, an extinct genus of horsetails. These horsetails, belonging to the class of Sphenopsida, were arborescent and grew to a height of 32 feet (10 meters) in a tree-like form. Annularia leaves are arranged in whorls of between 8-13 leaves. Its shape is quite variable, being oval in Annularia sphenophylloides and between linear and lanceolate in Annularia radiata, but they are always flat and of varying lengths. Kingdom: Plantae Phylum: Pteridophyta Class: Equisetopsida Order: Equisetales Family: Calamitaceae Genus: Annularia
  13. Bryozoans - Septopora subsuadrans a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bryozoans - Septopora subsuadrans Fossil Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Bryozoans are some of the most abundant fossils in the world. They are also widespread today, both in marine and freshwater environments, living at all latitudes and at depths ranging downward to at least 27,900 feet (8,500 meters). Septopora exemplifies the branching form of some bryozoan colonies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryzoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: Fenestrida Family: Septoporidae Genus: Septopora Species: subsuadrans
  14. Bryozoans - Septopora subsuadrans a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bryozoans - Septopora subsuadrans Fossil Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Bryozoans are some of the most abundant fossils in the world. They are also widespread today, both in marine and freshwater environments, living at all latitudes and at depths ranging downward to at least 27,900 feet (8,500 meters). Septopora exemplifies the branching form of some bryozoan colonies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryzoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: Fenestrida Family: Septoporidae Genus: Septopora Species: subsuadrans
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