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Found 304 results

  1. Ammonite Species

    ok to Dinosaur World, Plant City and there is this museum that has load of fossils and also has an exploration cave show in there and has loads of ammonite fossils but for 3 pics of these ammonite fossils is i dont know the species and the genus of them.
  2. It was raining this morning, so my best site was near Yaxley. The fossils really pop there when wet. In one hour of searching I had 13 fragments of ammonite. I thought it was 14, but when washing them realised one was a miffed snail, who is now in the garden. Mostly the ammonites are pyratised, and preserve sutures and ornamentation well. I found 8 crinoid sections, including round ossicles - I normally only find star shaped ones.
  3. Tiny Ammonites and Worms 15.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny ammonites just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  4. Tiny Ammonites and Worms 14.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny ammonites just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  5. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 13.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny ammonites just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  6. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 12.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  7. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 11.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  8. Tiny Crinoid Ossiclesand Worms 10.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  9. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 9.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  10. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 8.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  11. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 7.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  12. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 6.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  13. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 5.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  14. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 4.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  15. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 3.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  16. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 2.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  17. Tiny Crinoid Ossicles and Worms 1.JPG

    From the album 1925 Body & Trace Fossil Collection - Ocean

    Once you start looking at this specimen the tiny Crinoid Ossicles just keep appearing. Worm holes have not been vacated.
  18. This is getting to be a regular visit of mine, but this may be the last time for this garage sale that was being held by the daughter of two older ESCONI members who collected rocks and fossils all over the US and Canada. They had so much stuff, it could not be put out at one time, thus the weekly Saturday visits to see what was new. But before i put up the multiple picture heavy posts that will follow, I want to show a couple pictures of how some of the stuff was arranged. Today I was again got to meet the great Fossil Forum and ESCONI member Rich @stats, we spent time talking and revisiting items to make sure that we did not miss anything. Here are a picture of Rich searching for something good. Here are a couple pictures of the sale. Now before I post the items that I picked up today I want to show a couple pieces of Mazon Creek (MC) fossils that I picked up from the daughter after I went for an arrange showing of MC fossils on Tuesday. I wanted to see what they had since the were never put out before and I knew that others had set up similar visits in the past with her. I picked up the following pieces for $40.00 and though I do not generally buy MC fossils, I do love Annularia, and fertile ferns and I did get some. I also picked up Neuropteris, Alethopteris, Pecopteris and the Leech Coprinoscolex ellogimus. Now to my surprise, I picked you a couple pieces that struck my fancy and I sent a PM to Jack Witry @fiddlehead who gave me some surprising ID's to plants that I did not have in my collection. This piece I did not know the ID of this piece, but I did like the way it looked and I got it for $2.00. Jack stated that it "is a rare sterile example of Myriotheca scaberrima. He stated that an example of this species will be in his new Mazon Creek Flora book that will be coming out soon. This other piece I thought was a fertile Pecopteris and I just happened to send him a picture of it and my ID was wrong. Jack stated that it is an exceptional example of a fertile Diplazites unita. He stated that one of the interesting mysteries of the Mazon Creek flora is why 2 out of 3 examples of this taxon fertile. He further stated that no other fern except for some very rare taxa is anywhere near that ratio. Jack thanks again for your expertise and I can't wait to get your new book. Starting with the next post I will show some of the great stuff that I picked up today.
  19. Barely a month had gone by since my last trip to New Mexico and Colorado, but I already had plans for this trip in the works. Primary focus this time, which was a solo trip, was fossil collecting, visiting well known sites that have been on my radar for quite some time. I flew out to Salt Lake City and drove directly to Kemmerer, WY. My first stop there was Fossil Butte National Monument: Here is a view of the visitors center (free admission) and the surrounding barren, but awesome landscape that surrounds it:
  20. Back to the ditch

    I mentioned here about a week ago that I had discovered a promising new exposure in that Kimmeridgian ditch at the side of the road which I thought I'd pretty well exhausted over the last few years. I also said that I would probably go back again soon and true to my own word, I did. This time I took the car. I spent about 2 hours there and made some more good finds. They are all out of a concretionary horizon in the hypselocylum zone of the Lochen Formation sponge facies. It looks like there could very well be more to be found, so I guess I'll be going back there again before the snow sets in. Ataxioceras (Parataxioceras) hypselocylum, the ammonite which gives the zone its name. Parataxioceras sp. Streblites tenuilobatus together with a partial Ataxioceras sp. Taramelliceras sp. Taramelliceras sp., Lingulaticeras sp. and a Laevaptychus obliquus, part of the jaw aparatus from an ammonite.
  21. Fossil Road Trip - Georgia, Texas

    Both my brother and I celebrated graduations this year - my brother graduated from college and I graduated from law school. In celebration of our graduations, we decided to take a 13-day road trip to see some of the United States after I had taken the bar exam but before I began work. Our journey ultimately took us through Atlanta, New Orleans, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Oklahoma City, St. Louis, Dayton and Pittsburgh, before returning home. Our days were jam-packed, with us often not arriving at a hotel until 9/10pm, but along the way we did find some time to make a few quick stops to collect some fossils in Georgia and Texas. My brother is not a collector, but I was really excited to try to find some examples of the infamous Georgia trilobites, Texas echinoids and Texas ammonites. I want to thank @BobWill, @smt126, @facehugger, and @JamieLynn for answering my innumerable questions about Texas fossils. We ultimately did not have enough time to check out all of the places you suggested, but I will certainly store the knowledge for my next trip - hopefully in cooler weather. Our first stop was at Tibbs Bridge in Chatsworth, GA. Having heard the rumors about the potential illegality of the site I was a little worried when we arrived. We could not initially find parking and when we pulled off, we picked the wrong spot. The homeowner we parked near came out yelling at us about collecting beneath the bridge and threatening to call the police. Having driven all the way from New Jersey I was not yet ready to give up on the trip. We decided to pick another spot to park and given that my brother doesn't collect, he waited in the car in case something happened. We could not stay at the site for longer than 90 minutes, so I tried to find as much as I could. As a funny aside, I was soon joined by another group of collectors from Georgia, one of whom had recently spent time in my hometown in New Jersey. Small world! I was hoping to find some better preserved trilobites, but I had to ultimately settle with some nice impressions and a couple of smaller fragments of exoskeleton. I did find one large trilobite that still had all of its exoskeleton, but it was fractured and I could not put it back together even at home. I was able to keep the impression of the trilobite though. All of what I found were Aphelaspis brachyphasis. And the large trilobite whose exoskeleton was simply too damaged to repair
  22. Hello, I recently acquired some fossils from the Vallecillo member of the Agua Nueva formation. The Agua Nueva Lagerstätten is famous for its perfectly preserved fish and marine reptiles. It is late cenomanian in age about 90-93 million years old. I got two large ammonites from one of my trips to Mexico. I was wondering if someone can identify it to the family, and possibly the genus level. They are preserved in a finely bedded shale. This one one is the largest one it is about 8 inches long.
  23. Looking for fox hills formation Ammonites that are unprepped. Got plenty of uk Yorkshire Ammonites, with the odd few uk Dorset Ammonites too
  24. My son went on a canoe trip a few days ago and even though he took most of the fossils to his house he did drop some stuff off at my house. I wish he was on this forum so he could tell you folks how he wrapped his cheap plastic canoe around a rock in the middle of the river! Ha!!! Quite the story I assure you! Here is some stuff Im helping him out with but that kid sure has one heck of alot of Placenticeras ammo's!!! RB Here is one of the prettiest ive seen. Gunna take some work to save this one and has a super nice keel!!! My son said I could have this one. What a kid huh? My hope was that the rest of this concretion was loaded with more ammo's? This was the only one in the rock. Very purty but not good enough for this guy. He also found some lobster concs which surprized him,, and me too! Here is one Im putting back together that may turn out purty good? I take a toothbrush and water to clean all the pieces up and then its just a matter of gluing the puzzle back together. Not as easy as it sounds. I dont let even a grain of sand get in the way. A grain of sand can cause a lot more trouble than one thinks!!! Here ive glued on a piece to the main chunk and also two smaller pieces back together and then those will be glued on. And WAAALAAA,,,, all back together. Now its just wait for glue cure and it will be ready to go. This will be one of my winter projects. This lobster will be Hoploparia or Paleonepherops?
  25. My girlfriend, Valerie and I planned a two week trip to New Mexico and Colorado to visit friends, see scenery, and attend the Peach Festival in Palisades. Of course fossil collecting would be a part of it. I spent a full day with PFOOLEY outside Albuquerque in the Puerco Valley hunting ammonites in the Carlile Member of the Upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale.
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