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Found 261 results

  1. From the album Cretaceous

    Didymoceras binodosum Partial Inner Whorl from Juvenile Turrilite Ammonite Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Big Brook Marlboro, N.J.
  2. Ammonite hunt in Northern France

    We are back from a very windy fieldtrip to Cap blanc Nez in France. The wind covered a lot of the rocks with sand and sea foam ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_foam ) which made fossil hunting rather difficult. We were helped by a local collector in the morning who guided us through the Turonian deposits of this site where we rarely colect, here we got 2 big ammonites. One of them was a Mamites nodosoides, this species as been on my wishlist for a while, so I am very happy with it In the afternoon we prospected the Cenomanian side. her we found the usual Mantelliceras and Scloenbachia ammonites. The prospecting site: ( we did see the coast of the UK on the other side of the channel ) Some of the ammonites we found: The Mammites: pictures of the prepped specimens will follow during the next week.
  3. I am back from my trip to morocco. It is a 14 days trip and I got 4 days for fossil hunting. It was so imagine, fossils are everywhere and even though I won't be able to dig, I still get plenty to bring home. Since my guide doesn't speak good English, I am not be able to ask him must so I need help to identify the fossil. On the first day, my guide took me to a place near Erfoud to search for dinosaur teeth. It is very close to the highway. We found a well that the local people dig to get Spinosaur teeth and bone. My husband went down to one but couldn't find anything because the well is new and it is not deep enough. We didn't want to try the deeper one so we decide to bought some spinosaur teeth from the local people there. This tooth is a little over 4.5 inches and I think there are some prepare but I can't tell how much. I also bought 3 smaller teeth and was giving the broken one which I don't know what it is.
  4. A new ammonite clock.

    From the album Jurassic stuff uk

    stained glass clock with ammonites.
  5. Spent two afternoons in the workshop prepping some ammonites from the Beacon Limestone, a Toarcian deposit exposed in many places around Somerset, UK. Had a fair few disappointments, including several very large ammonites (for this area - about 8 inches) which had no centres. That's common for ammonites from this location, which is a pain because it often takes a lot of prep through sticky, tough rock before you can tell whether or not there's a centre. But there were some nice ones. I had cautiously high hopes for this large harpoceras... Which turned out justified, because this is one of the best examples of this species that I've found. The inner whorls are typically covered in quite sticky rock, and the surviving calcite steinkerns are often a little wibbly-wobbly in their preservation. I was pleased that this one retains the body chamber (or most of it). This one didn't turn out as well as I'd hoped, so I stopped short of making it perfect. It's OK. Not sure what species this is, but I have found a number with this attractive marbled surface. Two rare ammonites from this location. Phylloceras is a deep water ammonite, but these are shallow sea deposits, so they'd have to drift in. Body chambers are typically missing and they are often otherwise incomplete. I don't know what species this is. But it looks a bit unusual. Let me know if you have any ideas!
  6. I was overwhelmed with prep immediately after the 2011 trip my wife and I took to Europe, so I put down some of the more involved prep work until now. Initially I prepped only the flashiest stuff we found. Happy to be all caught up. Prep involved air scribe, dolomite microblast, and coating with a mixture of beeswax and turpentine. Hope you find them as appealing as we do. First, Drügendorf, Germany.
  7. This is another piece discovered at an estate sale, which of course means I do not have the info such as location it was found, etc. It has some amazing detail, spiny legs? but it's so squished into the matrix I have no idea what it could be. Hope to receive more info. The piece is approx. 6 x 4"
  8. Hello all, Currently digging through boxes I haven't looked through for several years and came across these two ammonites. I thought they were Kosmoceras grossourvrei but they seem to be too coarsely ribbed, Kosmoceras pollucinum maybe? Any help or advice with this would be greatly appreciated. Found in the Lower Oxford Clay of Kings dyke, Cambridgeshire. Callovian stage. Cheers, Jacob.
  9. Ammonites.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Various Ammonite species Found in Hays, Comal and Lampasas Counties
  10. Day Two ; Locality Two (or Seven if you include Day One) Prepping and Retail, Erfoud, Morocco. 20th February 2019 Erfoud town itself is famous for its beautiful fossils, its skilled fossil preppers and also for its wide variety of fakes, composites, good and bad repair jobs and utter frankenfossils. A large percentage of fossils from Morocco that are available in shops and on the internet the world over originate from here or pass through the place. Fossils are sent here for prepping from all over the south and then sent from here everywhere in the country and abroad. There are many little shops, prepping centres with huge attached shops and 'museums which are really pretty much just shops as well. Top Tip :The prices here are about ten times the price of the prices in the little shacks on the edge of town or elsewhere in Morocco, but haggling can reduce the cost significantly. Many places have 'fixed' prices, but they're actually always negotiable. This time, we went to the one my friend Anouar, who is a tour guide, takes his tourists and I was asked politely not to accuse the owners and chap who'd show us around and do the chat, of having fakes or wrong info, so i had to bite my lip. We asked if it was okay to take photos and they said yes, which I was surprised about, but I guess it was because Anouar was going to use photos for his own purposes and this would involve advertising the shop. Top Tip : You will see a lot of fixed prices in Moroccan Dirham in the pieces and shelves. Divide by ten to have a price in US dollars. Because we were with Anouar, we were told everything is 50% of the marked price, but I suspect they often do this anyway, "Special Berber prices, today only". I've heard that before. And you can still haggle to get something way under that 50% and you just know they'll still be making a good profit. I didn't buy anything. Little local stores are more my line anyway - I rarely shop in supermarkets. Here is the entrance where you can see huge plates ready for prepping and polishing, some have been cut into pieces and they glued back together it seems to me, I know this happens with the crinoid beds, so i guess it's true of the orthocerid and goniatite stuff too. Some just look cobbled together because of the circular saw marks when cutting out upper layers.With these, polishing will remove the grid lines. These sheets are from the local area and contain the goniatites and orthoconic nautiloids we were walking on earlier, but from a better quality, less eroded and distorted source. Famennian, Upper Devonian, I think. This photo shows one of the trenches they dig to reach the best quality material, similar to the ones i was walking along earlier this day : Below, somebody walking on the slabs and some maps of the the world at different times in it's past, showing continental drift. : Notice these are not the famous black orthocerid marbles that come from elsewhere. The picture of Spinosaurus is a bit misleading, as you all know, it's not found in these marbles or in the Erfoud area. In fact there is very little Kem Kem material available here these days, though there was in the past. I suspect the Kem Kem area probably has it's own facillities nowadays.
  11. clock3.jpg

    From the album Jurassic stuff uk

    A new stained glass clock with translucent ammonites.
  12. Hi all, a few pics of some stained glass lamps, clocks, and panels I have been making with thinly sliced ammonites inlaid. thanks. Neil.
  13. Ammonites de Madagascar

    Hello, Can you help me identify these 10 ammonites from Madagascar ?, please. Thanks.
  14. The compressor is fixed (more or less ) so I prepped 2 of the ammonites we found this weekend. First one was the Hypoturrilites sp. : work in progress : the end result 2nd one is the Mantelliceras mantelli with inoceramus found by Natalie81 work in progress: the end result: both specimens, ready to go in the display cabinets
  15. This Saturday Natalie and I hit the road towards the jurassic and cretaceous clifs in the North of France. This is a 2h trip from where we live, so we left early to make most of the use of the favorible tides on those beaches. the 1st stop were the Titonian deposits near Wimereux, not the most easy place to find fossils, but with patience some nice fossils can be found. Th big problem although on this trip was the wind... this made it relatively hard to search for fossils. we did manage to find a couple of jurassic ammonites, one of them was more than 30cm in diameter but needs a lot of cleaning. In the afternoon we went to the beaches at the cretaceous clifs near Calais. here again the wind gave us a hard time blowing a lot of sand in the air. Although the harsh conditions we did find a few decent cenomanian ammonites, including a nice heteromorph turrilites sp. pictures of the Titonian deposits and finds: pics of the ammonites of the cretaceous site:
  16. Day One; Locality Two AZROU February 19th 2019 A little further on in the High Atlas Mountains, at the heart of the cedar forest, lies the Berber village of Azrou, which means 'rock' in the Amazigh language of the locals. There is a huge and famous boulder just outside the town, hence the name. Many of the towns and especially villages in the mountains and the south of Morocco are populated by the Berber people rather than Arabs, so knowing a bit of Berber can really help get prices down and make the people extremely cooperative as speaking Arabic is not as impressive here as it is in the larger cities and towns elsewhere. Top Tip : A little Arabic is helpful, but a few words in Amazigh goes a long, long way. See the monkeys in the trees? Check out the Nature Photography Thread for more pics of the trees and monkeys. While wifey and the guys became acquainted with the famous Barbary Apes, actually a type of macaque monkey, I spotted the fossil shop opposite. And hurried across. The big ammonite is a man made beastie, often seen outside fossil shops to attract attention, but the quite large one near the front is real and from the local area. This is just the first of a whole row of shops set in a line running away from the road. However, the prices were very high, even with haggling and local languages, probably because this monkey area is a tourist hot spot. The local rocks seem to be Middle Jurassic and also contain some beautiful, large high-spired gastropods. Sorry, no photo, the cameras were back with the others. I managed to get some information on where to find some specimens only a ten minute walk away, so i set off into the forest, carefully avoiding large dollops of snow falling from the trees as the temperature rose. But the snow became deeper, the terrain dipped and it became impossible for me to proceed any further, so sadly, I sobbed and retreated back to the road. Caradhras had defeated him.
  17. Ammonites ID?

    Hi all, I will like to seek for advise regard the ID of this ammonites. Does anyone have any info regard the ammonite, the time line of ammonite before extinct?
  18. Hi, Does anyone ever see black nautilus fossil before? I saw this fossil in online but is kind of too perfect so will like to seek advise from you guys, is this a fake fossil or over process nautilus fossil?
  19. Hi I'm new to ammonite fossil can anyone help to ID this fossil? Is this a ammonite douvilleiceras fossil is it real or is just a "plastic"?
  20. Recently I wasnt very active here but I managed to find a couple fossils in the meanwhile. A week ago I planned to visit the Pliensbach near Holzmaden in Germany. The Pliensbach is a type locality for the so called Pliensbachium, a time period in the lower Jurassic. On the way I saw an old pile with some jurassic rocks and stopped there. Luckily I was able to find some fossils there! Here is a picture of the view I had on the top of the pile: Belemnites are very common there but I found two really nice and big ones. Both are about 15 cm long and they seem to be Acrocoelites(?) ( @TqB ). They are one of my best belemnites until! I also found remains of a very rare layer with many sea urchins and sea urchin spines in it. Too bad I wasnt able to find some urchins but I found some cool plates with many spines. At the top of the pile I found some ammonites from the Sinemurian. I like the pyrite on them! The one I am holding is probably an Oxynoticeras and the other one is a Gagaticeras: Here is an overview: And one more detailed picture: Finally I found a piece of Loligosepia aalensis (vampyromorpha) and some fish rests. Here is a picture of the vampyromorpha: Alter my visit at the pile I was at the Pliensbach for a short time but I didn't really found something I can show. Maybe I will post one or two pictures tomorrow. Thanks for watching
  21. From the album Cretaceous

    Imprint of Unidentified Heteromorphic Ammonite Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Ramanessin Brook Holmdel, N.J.
  22. Another Trachyscaphites

    From the album Cretaceous

    Trachyscaphites pulcherrimus Stream Worn Partial Ammonite Body Chamber Upper Cretaceous Wenonah Formation Matawan Group Big Brook Colts Neck, N.J.
  23. Help please. Complete beginner, first time hunting for fossils in Yorkshire, England (kettleness) I have no tools, just my hands and eyes at the minute Ive found a few ammonites which I would like to free. Thus far Ive watched youtube videos and googled only; they make it look so easy with just a hammer. My first attempt I broke the end off my ammonite and now afraid to try again. Please advise for tools and extraction methods? Also, how do I care for them once they are freed? many thanks!
  24. Another Crate

    I mentioned in a recent post that I was heading off into the field, or in this case the woods, again. It's getting to be a habit with me that I don't think to take my camera until it's to late, so, true to form, I forgot it again. This is why I've titled this with "Crate", since that's all I have to show for the trip to begin with. My plan was to go to my favorite Callovian site in order to finally fulfill my recurring dream of a large, well-preserved Bullatimorphites and/or Cadoceras ammonite. I always drive down to the end of a forestry road and park the car under the trees before I mosey off to the site, but this time it didn't quite pan out. The farther on I drove into the woods, the more the snow and ice had accumulated, so when I turned around and reversed into my parking spot, I noticed for the first time that I had to drive slightly uphill in order to complete the maneuver. Problem was that I couldn't, since the wheels were running on the spot and digging deeper into the quagmire every second. My head became immediately filled with visions of walking the 5 kilometers back to the next village in search of a tow truck or a frendly farmer, but after I'd settled down a bit, I decided that the best thing would be to get out of the car and assess the situation first. Fortunately, being a serious fossil collector, I always have a plethora of tools of all sorts in the trunk, so I selected my trusty pickaxe and spent the next half hour shaving the 5-inch layer of ice, mud and decaying leaves down to the gravel roadbed. Then, easing off in second gear, I managed to get back to dry land, so to speak. Thank goodness! It was at this point that I also decided that since I hadn't brought along my downhill skis, I would forgo slipping and sliding to a site which is more than likely still buried under a foot of snow. Fortunately this area has a good number of sites to chose from, so after a bit of driving around, I managed to find one on the hills of the Scheffheu which is pretty well free of snow and spent the rest of the day exploring and chipping out the odd fossil. This time it's a selection from the Aalenian and Bajocian of ammos and bivaves along with one belemnite, all of which need a good bit of prep.
  25. I haven't posted in a long time. I used to draw the occasional prehistoric beast but looking back, they always left a lot to be desired. Anyway, I have honed my craft and have since started a drawing degree. I don't do much paleo related drawings as the accuracy needed to be really good scares me! So while I've tried to keep mine reasonably accurate, they are always just for my own enjoyment. Here's a few I've done over the last year or so. First off, something special. This ichthyosaur skull was drawn from life in the Lyme Regis Museum. It was drawn with Jurassic squid ink that was extracted from a fossil found in Lyme. Not easy to draw with as it's quite pale and I couldn't get the contrast I usually like, but a very cool thing to have done. Next up we have a Promicroceras ammonite drawn in brown ink. An Allosaurus skull drawn in ink and copic markers. Quite pleased with how this came out. And finally one I did for part of my degree, my Apoderoceras ammonite. This was done in pen and coloured pencil and was drawn from life. This piece is as accurate as I could make it to the original and was drawn full scale. Hope you like them! Edit: Ignore the order, the pictures came out in the wrong order!
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