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Found 2,700 results

  1. Couple of Oddities

    Found a couple of oddities today, odd to me as I have never seen anything like it. Hopefully one of you have. The first is from the Eocene, Castle Hayne formation. Could it be a color impression , or mold of a coral ? The second is from the Cretaceous , Peedee formation. It looks like bryozoans , but why just in the hole ? Where they washed into the hole? The scale is mm in the first pics. Your thoughts and ideas are appreciated. Thanks.
  2. Is this Foraminifera?

    I found this 1/16 ~ 2/16 of an inch specimen from Trinity river, near downtown Dallas where I also found species of Prionocyclus ammonite from Arcadia park formation (c. 89-91 mya).
  3. Serrated Spinosaurid Tooth - Kem Kem

    I've spoken to Troodon a little elsewhere on the forum regarding this serrated Spino tooth; my main question is regarding the root - can anyone verify whether the root looks to originally be from this tooth? It's obviously been reattached, but sand has been used to fill a gap between the crown & root, which makes me wonder a little. For anyone wanting wider details around this little oddball: • Length approx 48mm long (including the root) • Very slightly recurved • Mesial carina naturally terminates at the midline • Denticles appear to be 2/mm on both carinae • Veiny enamel texture • Extremely minor fluting on one side The Interesting Features: Mesial Margin: Distal Margin: Enamel Texture: Apologies for the godawful photos. (I definitely need to get a better microscope for this stuff!)
  4. I spent a few hours each at the North Sulphur River Texas and Post Oak Creek Texas. I had a nice variety of cretaceous finds.
  5. I found my first cretaceous ammonite at Post Oak Creek Texas. I find ammonites often at other locations but they don't seem to be common at Post Oak Creek.
  6. Trip to Big Brook

    Hi. I thought it would be a good day yesterday to go to Big Brook yesterday. It rained for almost two straight days and the temperature jumped up to 55-60 degrees. I thoughts with all the rain and warmer temperature I would be able to get some good finds yesterday. Yesterday the temperature dropped into the 30's and it snowed. The water was the highest I have ever seen it because of the rain. I could not even get to my favorite spot because it was under water. I found a couple decent spots to look around. Here are my finding. A couple things I have no idea what they are and something I think I know what they are. If anyone can help with the ID's that would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
  7. From the album Arthropods

    Eryma cretacica Upper cretaceous Cénomanian Hajoula Lebanon
  8. Bone or rock in NJ Cretaceous stream?

    I know its most likely not bone, but something looked different about this piece, like a socket. Found in NJ Cretaceous Stream. Concretion? Rock? Or any chance at dino bone?
  9. ??? fossil

    Hi friends, can you help me with this? I went to Al Hasi city, Sulaiy formation ( Berriasian) , Cretaceous , to the north of Riyadh and found this strange fossils. It was a surface find; it is 20 cm long, 18 cm wide, and 3-4 cm thick. The outer face is rough and in layers , the inner surface is semicircular and smooth , similar fossils are everywhere in the same area in varies sizes . So what could it be?
  10. Goblin shark tooth jackpot

    Had a banner day on the NJ Cretaceous stream beds, sifting through the fallen leaves scanning gravel bars for some impressive Scapanoryhnchus teeth. I swear I found a whole jaw in two hours!
  11. Fossil found in Fukui identified as new primitive bird species By Naoki Hirano, The Ashi Shimbun, December 4, 2019 http://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/AJ201912040008.html Science News http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/fukuipteryx-prima-07808.html The open access paper is: Imai, T., Azuma, Y., Kawabe, S., Shibata, M., Miyata, K., Wang, M. and Zhou, Z., 2019. An unusual bird (Theropoda, Avialae) from the Early Cretaceous of Japan suggests complex evolutionary history of basal birds. Communications biology, 2(1), pp.1-11. https://www.nature.com/articles/s42003-019-0639-4 Yours, Paul H.
  12. Hello all! I recently rearranged my collection so I figured this would be a good time to show some fossils! I usually hang-out in the New Jersey Cretaceous but I have been collecting fossils for over 25 years and have found some pretty cool specimens of creatures from many different eras, That said, my collection is mainly focused on the New Jersey Cretaceous, so let's start there. These are my displays for New Jersey Cretaceous non-reptile fossils. My favorites aren't actually fossils at all but rather casts of some of my favorite finds. The crab, Costadromia Hajzeri is the earlies known sponge crab and was named after me. The lungfish cast is of one of two specimens of late Cretaceous lungfish found from New Jersey (probable new species based on time period and 'crushing' element of teeth. The big Xiphactinus tooth is another of my favorite finds along with the echinoids and Menunites ammonite (pictured).
  13. Pathological Cretalamna sp. Texas

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Texas Cretalamna with moderate pathologies, from Britton Formation, Eagle Ford Group.
  14. Pathological Cretalamna sp. Texas

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Texas Cretalamna with moderate pathologies, from Britton Formation, Eagle Ford Group.
  15. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    One of only 6 known Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
  16. Kem Kem Leptostyrax macrorhiza

    From the album Cretaceous Shark Teeth

    Very rare Leptostyrax from the Kem Kem beds of Morocco. Lower Upper-Cenomanian in age.
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  18. cretaceous,USA,Pisces

    A new large Late Cretaceous lamniform shark from North America, with comments on the taxonomy, paleoecology, and evolution of the genus Cretodus Kenshu Shimada &Michael J. Everhart Article: e1673399 | Received 30 Nov 2018, Accepted 09 Sep 2019, Published online: 18 Nov 2019 LINK (description of Cretodus houghtonorum n.sp) edit:5,30 MB,or thereabouts relevant: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character Vol. 210 (1921), pp. 311-407 V I I I .— On the Calcification o f the Vertebral Centra in Sharks and Rays. B y W . G. R id e w o o d, D.Sc. 18 MB!!
  19. Coprolite? Bearpaw fm.

    About a year and a half ago I found this rock that I highly suspect might be a coprolite. However, I figured I should get some second opinions, as I'm not very experienced with identifying these, beyond looking at it and thinking, "Yep, looks like a turd to me"... It seems to exhibit evidence of compaction and pinching though, which is what really prompted my diagnosis. Funnily enough, this is also what made me think it might have been a meteorite when I first found it. Anyway, it was found in an area where the late Campanian marine Bearpaw formation outcrops, but was among some glacial drift so I can't correlate it with a specific layer, or even with the Bearpaw formation itself. The size and shape indicates to me that it must be from either a plesiosaur or mosasaur, as it lacks the characteristic coiling of a shark coprolite. I also had a chance to look at this one under a microscope (no photos unfortunately), and noticed small flakes that had a superficial semblance to the iridescent, aragonitic nacre that's often found preserved in the molluscan fossils from the area (you can sort of see these in the second photo), which further makes me think that this is from a mosasaur. Thanks.
  20. These are among the first comma shrimp fossils from 97 million years ago. I didn't even know comma shrimp were a thing. They also found some crabs in this Northern South America site. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-11-world-oldest-comma-shrimp.html
  21. Had a lovely day out hunting with a new fossil friend - @Nuna! She said let's go hunting in Austin - i know a spot! Turns out that spot was the creek near the house I grew up - lived there from age 6-17. I had not been back in a long long time.. and I certainly have not been in the creek since I was probably 10 years old! I realized that my earliest "fossil memory" was going to the creek with the neighbor kid Jimmy to hunt for fossils when we were 8 (2nd grade I guess?). I remember we found brachiopods... He then invited me to go to a Paleontology Society of Austin meeting. I remember being the two youngest there, for sure! Now, flash forward 40 years and i am now a member of the PSoA (joined a few months ago). So Nuna, her awesome dog Mack and I head down into the creek. It is absolutely beautiful. I did not know there was an easy access, we crawled down the culverts to get there in the past! I am not adverse to crawling through culverts, but am happy not to! We poked around, found those brachiopods! plus a few other little things, a few ammonite chunks. Then we found the sweet spot. Some of the biggest Neithia bivalves I've seen, lots of brachiopods, I found a lovely big Leptomaria gastropod, a broken Pecten wrighti and a little ammonite (Nuna found the good ammonite of the day) and some other nice stuff. But then I found a little chunk of something that I was not sure....but recognized it as fossil. And then I found a whole one....a gorgeous cidarid spine. And found another. Never found the body, but I love those spines! A few feet further, i see what looks like a heart urchin (of which there are LOTS in Central Texas in certain locations) so I was happy, but not super excited, until I realized it was a bit different than what I had found in the past. Turns out it is a new to me species - Holaster simplex! So a nostalgic walk in the park became a bonanza echinoid day for me. Big thanks to Nuna for taking me "back to my old hunting grounds"!!!! Based on the stuff we found, I'm assuming this is Georgetown formation.....any corroboration? Leptomaria gastro Pecten texana: ( i love the red coloration on this one) Pecten wrighti: Brachiopod Kingena: Echionid Holaster simplex: Cidarid Spine :
  22. Goblin or something else

    Found this little tooth this weekend. I’m sure it must be a S. raphiodon but the cusplets come directly out of a broader based blade. Not like the others I usually find. May just be because it is a juvenile?
  23. 400 Million years in 4 hours

    400 Million years in 4 hours The small-scale geology of Austria makes it possible to observe and collect invertebrate marine fossils from a time span of nearly 400 Million years (Ma) within a few hours and at a distance of only about 10 km: - 395 Ma old Devonian (Eifelian) corals - Ölberg - 80 Ma old Cretaceous (Campanian) rudists – St. Bartholomä - 12 Ma old Miocene (Serravallian/Sarmatian) gastropods - Waldhof I did this special hunting trip west of Graz at October 22, 2019 as a "feasibility study". The youngest and oldest fossils can simply be picked from the ground (or photographed); the “middle-agers” require some searching; I succeeded to find a few good specimens within one hour. Weather was perfect with nearly 25°C (!). Simplified geological map of Styria with the visited area west of Graz (red rectangle). Geological map of the visited area (1:50.000), composed of two adjoining map sheets. Red numbers denote visited fossil sites (and their age in Million years). Note the fossil sign in the blue formation in the upper middle of the map. This is the upper Devonian Steinberg-formation with goniatites. These fossils are not abundant, though, so I have never explored this hill… Topo map of the area. Red numbers denote fossil sites, A and B are sites of landscape pics. Just to show off some landscape: View from point “A” in Steinberg towards west. K = Kreuzegg mountain (570 m, Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation) at a distance of ca. 5 km. A = Plateau-like Amering mountain (2187 m, high-grade metamorphic rocks) at a distance of ca. 40 km. View from point “B” at Kreuzegg mountain towards north to southeast. Pano composed of 4 individual pics, spanning about 140°. Labeled mountains and hills in the background are: S = Schöckl (1445 m, Devonian epimetamorphic limestone) at a distance of ca. 20 km. P = Plabutsch mountain (754 m, namesake of the fossil-rich Eifelian Plabutsch-formation) and B = Buchkogel mountain (656 m), both at distance of ca. 10 km and located immediately to the west of Graz. Ölberg and Waldhof sites are between P and B, but not visible. Note the about 1000 m high, largely deforested mountains at the left side of the pano (Mühlberg, Pleschkogel etc., lower Devonian, dolomitic Flösserkogel-formation). The severe deforestation of these hills is due to a strong storm in 2008 (“Paula”). Continued...
  24. Hell Creek Fish (?) Jaw Section

    Hey everyone, I found this little jaw section at a microsite in North Dakota's Hell Creek formation this past summer and I'm finally getting around to posting about it. I believe it's fish, possibly gar, but I'm not sure. I'd like to know people's opinions. It's about 1.3 centimeters long. Thanks, Noel
  25. The legs show that snakes retained legs for 70 million years. More importantly, these fossils help explain the extreme flexibility of snake skulls. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-11-fossils-snakes-lost-legs.html
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