Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Image'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholom√§, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 6 results

  1. I'm having a hard time finding any images of anything other than the outside/side view of a spinosaur pelvic bone. I'm trying to see what the bone looks like in general, but all too many times...WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY too many times I'll spend forever unsuccessfully trying to come across pictures, images, or diagrams that show what a bone looks like from other angles than what you see be looking at the skeleton from generic angles, like this one. In some cases it's not TOO difficult, but even those common bones have areas that you can never see, unless you get totally lucky and happen across it, OR if there's maybe, hopefully some site/database that specifically shows what entire bones look like. I doubt that, but I know there's perfect diagrams floating around on the web, but I can't seem to find any *im just talking about dinos and other extinct animal bones. I'm sure there's plenty of sites with images of every conceivable angle of every bone from humans and common living animals, but I'm not looking for that kind of thing.
  2. It seems that the notorious T-rex was not only inaudible (there was already an article about it), but it also looked a little .... weird http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5218921/T-rex-tufty-hair-orange-eyebrows.html
  3. Xray of Hyaenodon mandibles

    From the album Badlands, Nebraska megafauna.

    The two associated Hyaenodon horridus mandibles from Nebraska puzzled me because they appear to be from an adult but when I removed some matrix i saw gaps for a molar and a tip of a tooth peeping out. I looked into it and it seems that the last molar doesn't reupt until age 3-4 so that is roughly the age of this animal. To verify, I asked a good mate to xray it. Th huge erupting molars are clearly see in the imagine. You can also clearly see the tooth roots below the crowns of the teeth and below the gum line (ie embedded into the bone). You can also clearly make out the mandibular canal (long dark line running ventrally below) the teeth - it's where the major veins, arteries and nerves of the bone run. Great view of millions of years old bone and teeth! Confirms that the teeth are erupting molars and gives me a great idea of the age. Not, quite juvenile, more like subadult.
  4. I have two associated Hyaenodon horridus mandibles from Nebraska. They puzzled me because they appear to be from an adult but when I removed some matrix is saw gaps for a molar and a tip of tooth peeping out. I looked into it and it seems that the last molar doesn't reupt until age 3-4 so that is roughly the age of this animal. To verify, I asked a good mate to xray it. You can clearly see the tooth roots below the crowns of the teeth and below the gum line (ie embedded into the bone). You can also clearly make out the mandibular canal (long dark line running ventrally (below) the teeth - it's where the major veins, arteries and nerves of the bone run. Great view of millions of years old bone and teeth! Confirms that the teeth are erupting molars and gives me a great idea of the age. Not, quite juvenile, more like subadult.
  5. I came across an article today on using a printer scanner to image shark teeth. It worked well for the labial side (relatively flat). However, the lingual side was less than satisfactory. Have any of you used this method of imaging teeth, and do any of you have tips on getting good images for the lingual side? Thanks, Carson
  6. Hello everyone! If you are interested in Eocene elasmobranch teeth, you can look at some specimens on https://sites.google.com/site/kyivzub/ Emphasize is made on 3D-imaging. Stereopairs are designed for cross-eyed viewing without any devices (if unfamiliar, look, for example, http://apophysisrevealed.com/viewing.html) New teeth will be added constantly: my rate of finding is bigger than rate of scanning. Help with identification is welcomed!
×