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Found 816 results

  1. Ichthyosaur Jaw

    Hi just putting this in as a placeholder. Found today at Penarth, South Wales, UK. An ichthyosaur jaw with some other bones. It’s in a shelly limestone which is hard to prep but fingers crossed.
  2. Caked in the mud

    I went back to Yaxley, and because my method of fossil hunting at this site is to sit on the ground and look very closely for often tiny fossils, got caked in mud. There was less visible than last week, but I found lots of crinoids and ammonites, including this, less than a centimetre.
  3. Burrow

    I think this is a burrow, but is a lot more regular than the others I've found. Is there any way to tell what creatures made the burrows? And is this a burrow or something else? This is from the Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member Callovian - Middle Jurassic.
  4. Ifrane, Morocco.

    Hi, gang. Some of you may remember the Southern Morocco trip I took in February. One of the places visited was quite near to me, about 70 km, lovely Swiss style mountain town called Ifrane where I found some Middle Jurassic brachiopods and echinoids. See http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/93193-ifrane-middle-atlas-morocco/&tab=comments#comment-1026671 A friend offered to drive me up there for the day so off we went I decided to check some outcrops on the other side of the road this time so went and had a peek.Sorry, no photos this time as wifey didn't come, she was ironing her money and she has the only camera phone. The first outcrop is an oyster bed crammed with enormous oysters. This is incredibly hard and couldn't be broken safely. (safely as in getting the fossils out in one piece, not my own personal well-being). But I was lucky enough to find this monster just lying a the base: Scale in inches it would seem. I think I can clean it up a bit. Eventually. After i'd dragged my broken carcass a few hundred whatevers further on, the limestone became yellower, softer but still pretty hard. Lots of broken shell material, a couple of ammonite bits, but the only salvageable items were these couple of rather nice gastropods; again, they should clean up a bit better: Oh, the scale's in centimetres this time. I felt like a change. You know, it's amazing how often I've given up on a days collecting and then, on the way back to the car, you find something just in your path that makes the trip. Here was mine this time : Forgot the scale altogether. Sigh. Maybe four or five centmetres diameter. Harpoceras, perhaps? It has a very pronounced keel. @Ludwigia Roger? I'll be able to prep this pretty well in 2046 when i get to my Jurassic stuff. Nothing spectacular, but it's always so nice to be out in the field collecting. Life's Good. Adam.
  5. Need help

    so i went to Orlando Science Center today for the Dino Digs exhibition but in Jurassic Ridge dig pit area i know that there is a Camptosaurus, Camarasaurus, Ceratosaurus and a Stegosaurus, but there is some species and genus of dinosaurs and other animals that i dont know what there like take for example the turtle shell, the alligator crocodile like animal fossil, the ankylosaur like fossil and that bone that i dont know what species does it belong to and that nest that i don't know which dinosaur does it belong to.
  6. It was raining this morning, so my best site was near Yaxley. The fossils really pop there when wet. In one hour of searching I had 13 fragments of ammonite. I thought it was 14, but when washing them realised one was a miffed snail, who is now in the garden. Mostly the ammonites are pyratised, and preserve sutures and ornamentation well. I found 8 crinoid sections, including round ossicles - I normally only find star shaped ones.
  7. This is from the Oxford Clay, Peterborough Member so Callovian, Middle Jurassic. I'm not sure what it is, it's very small and I took the pictures with a digital camera - the scale is in mm. Other fauna found with it included ammonites, crinoids, belemnites and gryphia. Any suggestions appreciated. Other things I've found of a similar size and shape there are echinoid spines and some kind of burrow cast, but this is very different. I was wondering if it might be a different part of a crinoid than I'm used to finding?
  8. A Field Trip

    In the last issue of our German magazine "Fossilien" there was an interesting article about a site right in the middle of my stomping grounds of which I was not aware. My area is practically all Jurassic, but this site is in a basin which exposes a middle miocene maar lake, so the other day I figured I'd go have a look for some gastropods, plants and bivalves. Sorry, I forgot to take my camera again. The area is not all that big and I was able to walk over and around the fields on it within a few hours. There were a lot of loose stones to inspect, but unfortunately there were hardly any fossils to be found despite the fact that I did an awful lot of hammering. At least I came up with a couple of little freshwater bivalves and funnily enough, although this was not mentioned in the description, an ammonite on a late Jurassic limestone block. Pisidium sp. on the left. Can't identify the other one. Any ideas? Trimarginites sp. I still had a couple of hours to spare, so I decided to take a walk over one of my favorite fields near Geisingen and this time I had a bit more luck. Here they are all prepped. Garantiana sp. Prorsisphinctes pseudomartinsi
  9. Coprolite

    Hi Some time ago I found such a Kelowa specimen in Częstochowa. Is this a coprolite? If so, who? It looks like something has been eaten by a brachiopod. thank you in advance for your help Dimensions: about 4.5 cm x about 2.5 cm.
  10. Diplodocus toe bone?

    To recap from my last post, I work for a large traveling animatronic dinosaur show. I handle our display of real fossils. Recently, the company's management purchased a number of real fossils that came to me without proper identification. However, most of the fossils we had previously also lacked proper identification in regards to where they were found, and I'm beginning to question all of our labels. Everyone involved in their original acquisition either can't recall where many of our pieces came from, or are now deceased. I'm hoping to try to verify or re-identify every major fossil in our collection one piece at a time This is a piece that was already in the collection when I joined. Its described as a Diplodocus toe bone, from one of the rear feet. There might not be enough here to confirm or rule out that description, but I appreciate any insight that anyone can give me. I have a vague recollection of being told it came from Colorado, but I'm not sure if I was actually told that, or if I just presumed that it came from the Morrison formation. More images: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=153AkHCZOrFkccnZ44ZTI_q8-i8SczWlI
  11. Some more Jurassic Brachiopods.

    Hello everyone, I got a few brachiopods from a trade with @will stevenson , I don't have much info on them other than that they used to be part of a Victorian collection and are from Wiltshire, as well as them being Jurassic. Very curious as to what they are, any info is appreciated. Brach 1: Brach 2: Brach 3, Very similar to 2: Brach 4:
  12. Just got back from a trip to England - still fighting the jet lag a bit! 7 hours time difference makes for interesting sleep patterns! Thought y'all might want to see what I all I found in Great Britain! Of course, we started in London, doing all the London things, including the Natural History Museum! Got to see Mary Annings plesioarus and mosasaurs. And the archeoptyrix! And the dino room!! And much much much more.....whew. Left London to visit friends in Bury St. Edmund, near Cambridge. We went to see the Sutton Hoo burial near Ramsholt in Suffolk which I had heard of a fossil hunting spot there- didn't really get to look much because there was a boat burning at the docks.....so fire trucks and smoke and commotion. I found out later that the main hunting area was a 45 minute hike from the waterfront, so I kind of missed out. Wasn't really prepared to hike that far, with friends who aren't really into fossil hunting, so I contented myself with poking along the water front and found a couple of little things.... (not the shell, I found that embedded in the dirt at Framlingham Castle, not sure if it is a fossil or just a shell). I'm not really sure what any of them are, the bullet shape I was assuming was a cephalopod, but it might be a phragmocone and I really don't know what the little round one is, perhaps a vertebra? I didn't have a coin for scale, but the little round is 3/4 inch. Next on the fossil tour was Yaxley Hampton Vale lake near Petersborough. I had heard it was a good spot, if somewhat picked over, but I found it to be quite good! I didn't find any ammonites (which I was hoping for) or crinoids (although my friend who was driving found a HUGE crinoid stem - beginners luck, the rat). But found a nice sized belemnite, plus these those neat little white spicule things. I saw them ID'd somewhere a while back (sponges, I think) , but now I can't seem to find what they are called, so if you know, please let me know! A Swan at Yaxley: But the highlight of the trip was a guided tour around Weymouth, with the interesting and outspoken Adrian Davies! He picked us up and toured us all around Portland Island and Weymouth with info on the history of the town plus stops for fossil hunting! First stop was to a cobble beach with "roach stones"...what we in Texas call Rattlesnake Rock. My husband found a dolphin spine washed up (I really wanted to take some of the vertebra, but decided they might not let me back in the US)! You can see all the cobbles around the dolphin. My "roachstones" The view from Portland looking back toward Weymouth: And the best for last - my finds of ammonites (16 of which are pyrite!) , crinoids, belemnites, a phragmocone, a sponge and a bit of bone plus some other stuff: A few more pics of my finds: Me with my nose to the ground- it was a bit chilly and windy...and then I came home to the Texas heat.. And then a day later, I went to the Quarry at Midlothian on a 100 degree day. But that's another story.....
  13. Unknown brachiopod

    Hello everyone today I acquired this fossil from @will stevenson and am not sure what kind of brach it is. It looks really interesting and I believe it may be Jurassic, but that's just a guess. Any info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.
  14. Bite mark belemnite?

    Hi Is this bite mark belemnite?
  15. First tooth!

    Today I found beautiful tooth, probably shark, maybe Sphenodus? Looking for confirmation. Only glossy part measures 38 mm Found near Cracow, limestone, jurrasic.
  16. Bone from upper jurassic

    Hi, I've found this bone in France kimmeridge clay. It's marine deposit so the majority of vertebrates are marine reptiles like pliosaur, plesiosaur, crocodile, ichthyosaur etc.. I have some ideas about the determination of this bone but I do not prefer to influence you. Many thanks for your help. Regards Carbon.
  17. Trip to Yaxley pit, Peterborough, UK

    Here are some interesting small fossils I found on a recent trip. The fossil in the first three pictures is 8mm long. The next two are of a flat fossil about 13mm long
  18. The fossil record of Antarctic land mammals

    Gelfo, J.N., Goin, F.J., Bauza, N., and Reguero, M., 2019. The fossil record of Antarctic land mammals: commented review and hypotheses for future research. Advances in Polar Science. 30(3): 251-273 doi: 10.13679/j.advps.2019.0021 (open access) http://www.aps-polar.org/paper/2019/30/03/A190814000002 PDF: http://www.aps-polar.org/paper/2019/30/03/A190814000002/full Gelfo, J.N., López, G.M. and Santillana, S.N., 2017. Eocene ungulate mammals from West Antarctica: implications from their fossil record and a new species. Antarctic Science, 29(5), pp.445-455. (open access) https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318350360_Eocene_ungulate_mammals_from_West_Antarctica_implications_from_their_fossil_record_and_a_new_species https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Javier_N_Gelfo Yours, Paul H.
  19. Whitby find; wood?

    Found this piece on a beach near Whitby known for Jurassic marine fossils. Is it anything of interest; wood perhaps, or just inorganic? Thanks
  20. Whitby Area finds

    Had a couple of hours on a beach in the Whitby area today but tides weren’t favourable. Along with a load of the usual Belemnites, Ammonites and Bivalves I also found these and was wondering A) is the item in pictures 1 & 2 a piece of amber that has been roughed up by the sea? I have heard of people ffinding amber here but am yet to see any. B ) What is the item in the third picture? thanks
  21. Here is a small trip only minutes away from downtown Salt Lake City. If you would like the exact location, PM me. I hadn’t been to this site in a couple years so it took @Earth Chemistry and I a couple hours to re-discover it so here’s a little history about the area. Ok first, the structural geology in this area is quite famous as it is a large pair of synclines. From https://geology.utah.gov/wp-content/uploads/synclines.gif They were made in the Sevier Orogeny about 120 Ma to 50 Ma ago.
  22. Ichthyosaur vertrebra

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 3.7 cm long Ichthyosaur vertebra from the Posidonia shale from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. Here two more pictures: And a bad picture of the unprepped vertebra: The stone was extremely hard so the prep work was very difficult.
  23. Ichthyosaur paddle bones

    From the album Holzmaden

    These are four Ichthyosaur paddle bones from the lower Jurassic from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden. The prep was very difficult because the stone was kinda hard. I gave it up several times but now its finally finished. I hitted the bones a few times so its not the nicest piece. Maybe I will try to prep it from the other side one day. Some more pictures:
  24. Found today on the English Yorkshire Coast ( Runswick bay). At first i thought it was maybe layers of a type of fossilised plant but I cant find anything to match the markings on this. Completely baffled by it. Looks very cool though. ID help, please?
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