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Found 912 results

  1. Morrison Formation yields remains of predatory insect. Utah State Parks Blog, Vernal, Utah https://stateparks.utah.gov/2020/05/20/famous-dinosaur-producing-rocks-in-utah-yield-fossil-of-large-predatory-insect/ Jurassic bug: Researchers find 151-million-year-old Morrisonnepa Jurassica insect fossil in Utah by Jordan Culver, USA TODAY, May 22, 2020 https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/05/21/morrisonnepa-jurassica-151-million-year-old-bug-fossil-utah/5234187002/ the paper is: Lara, M.B., Foster, J.R., Kirkland, J.I. and Howells, T.F., 2020. First fossil true water bugs (Heteroptera, Nepomorpha) from Upper Jurassic strata of North America (Morrison Formation, southeastern Utah). Historical Biology, pp.1-9. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08912963.2020.1755283 Yours, Paul H.
  2. Mystery Yorkshire Fish

    Hello Everyone, I found this eroded partial nodule while on a fossil hunt at Runswick Bay last year. I think it contains part of a fish but I'm not sure of the type. I've had a look at some other Yorkshire fish material, primarily Gyrosteus, but haven't seen anything like it yet. Most of the Gyrosteus material seems to be much bigger then whats in this block. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify what it is, I think I have sections of fin as well as possibly a cluster of ribs eroding out of the block. I've also included an annotated image of the front and back since the material is very difficult to pick out in pictures. I'm sure I have missed a few bits but I drew in everything I can see. Also, is there any way to prep this sort of material? The block is full of calcite veining so I assume manual preparation is near impossible, certainly well beyond my beginner abilities. Any and all information you can give me is greatly appreciated. Thank you, Benton
  3. Hello! As soon as lockdown is over, my friend and I are planning a fossil trip, most likely to the Jurassic coast. Now, we've done Charmouth, Lyme Regis to death. Can anybody recommend any other good locations for finding reptile bits? The find rates don't need to be as high, but it would be nice to try somewhere new
  4. Mcmaker's showcase

    Hello everyone. I wanted to share with you my fossils collection. I started fossils hunting in my area back in the june 2019 and that's what I collected and preparated since then. First of all, my favourite belemnites. I donated one of the largest rostrum (7 intact inches, on the second photo) to the Jurassic Museum in my country, feels good So, let's get started, that's one of twelve full shelves, this one is especially for belemnites
  5. I was wondering if there are any permian to cretaceous reptile/amphibian fossils that even an newbie like me can acquire without having to dig or pay a huge price for,I looked for permian and triassic stuff and it is really hard to find such things Are barasaurus legal to buy?
  6. UK Marine Reptile Teeth

    Hello all, I've had two teeth in my collection for many years now. I've recently moved and lost the supplied ID labels that came with them. I've taken this as a nice opportunity to see what others may think they are. I believe if memory serves me right the large tooth (Tooth A in photos) was labeled as a Simolestes. Then the smaller tooth tip (Tooth B in photos) labeled as Liopleurodon. I know both were found in the Wicklesham pit in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, UK. Upon some research, I found an article from 2014 with a Dakosaurus tooth discovered to be the largest in the UK at the time. This tooth bears some resemblance to tooth A but I'm unsure. I've attached a link to the article below. Tooth B has been worn down but still presents with grooves in the enamel. I have also labeled each photo to allow for easier identification when talking about it (Hope this helps!). Im excited to hear what others think. Thanks for reading Link to articles on Dakosaurus- http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/science-tooth-fossil-dakosaurus-maximus-01954.html
  7. From the album Brachiopodes, Shells, corals, sponges......

    Zeilleria Humeralis Kimméridgian pointe du Chay , Angoulins, près de La Rochelle (Charente Maritime).France
  8. Collection

    Hi all, after seeing all these nice collections from other members I also want to share the collection of my father and I with you. The collections is of various time periods and sites. We started collecting in 2009 close to home in a quarry nearby Maastricht called 't Rooth (sadly this quarry is close for visitors since 2016). From there on we started visiting other quarries and the collection started too grew massively. We frequently visited the ENCI, Winterswijk and Solnhofen. I will start off with some of the display cabinets
  9. Belemnites have been my core interest for decades, starting as an 8 year old kid when I saw and bought the pointy end of a large Cylindroteuthis in a curio shop (I still have it ). This led eventually to being able to research some Lower Jurassic ones for my Ph.D at university. I pursued another career after that (musical instrument repair and restoration) but palaeontology has remained a fairly fanatical interest ever since. Most of my early collection (including nearly all the research stuff) has been lost for various reasons but I've been able to replace much of it and added many new forms with field trips and purchases. So I'll start this thread with a few species from the Lower Lias, Lower Pliensbachian Stage, that first made me realise that not all belemnites look the same. This was a time of sudden diversity for the group. Earlier species (Sinemurian) are small and of low diversity, mostly belonging to the genus Nannobelus (= "dwarf dart"). (I'll do those later). All from the Charmouth Mudstone Formation, Stonebarrow Marl Member (formerly "Belemnite Marls"). Charmouth, Dorset, UK. Jamesoni Zone, Polymorphus Subzone. Bairstowius junceus/longissimus (Phillips, Miller). (junceus is the currently accepted name for the large form and longissimus for small, slender ones. The small ones appear to be immature individuals so they should probably all be longissimus which has priority.) A group all collected from the same small fallen block - almost certainly all the same species. (A large collection shows a complete series of intermediate forms, though probable sexual dimorphism divides fatter and thinner adults.) From the same beds - the scarce Coeloteuthis (Clastoteuthis) abrupta (Coeloteuthis is an awkward genus that needs revision - a bit complicated, but basically the original type specimen has been lost and the genus has ended up being based on a lectotype that is a different species and probably genus, and even family...) Just for comparison: "normal" belemnites - species of Passaloteuthis - exist in the same beds and are common. Here are two(?) species, the top two specimens probably being variants of one.
  10. Crinoid

    Hi, does anyone know the species of this crinoid ? It was found in the Forest Marble formation of bathonian, Jurassic, UK. Thanks.
  11. Shark teeth (and a few others)

    Hi everyone , I found these fossils while picking through micro matrix and am not sure what they are. Does anyone know the genus/species of these finds? They were found in the Forest Marble formation which is bathonian, Jurassic. 1. Interesting tooth. Fish/shark? 2. Another tiny tooth. I would say croc but it looks way too small. 3. a tiny hybodont 4. enamel? 5. no clue 6. bone?
  12. Fossil hunting on a tray...

    Hi everyone , Since we’re on lockdown, I’ve been processing the little amount of micro matrix I had and a few interesting things have shown up. I’m mainly on the hunt for teeth but they are rather scarce and most of the matrix is composed of shell fragments. Some of the stuff I’ve been finding is crinoid stars, Bryozoans and fish scales. Most of this stuff is tiny and I actually can't tell what it is until I put it under the microscope. I’d be very grateful if you could ID some of the pieces as well. Here’s some of what I’ve found. I have more pictures but will post tomorrow. Here’s an interesting little tooth which I didn’t really do the best job of repairing but it was very small . Here’s what I thinks a little fish scale. I’m actually not sure what this is Here’s the only detailed complete crinoid star I’ve found so far. . Here is an absolutely tiny fish? tooth. I would say it looks croc but I’m not sure croc could possibly this small. I actually thought it was just a shard of a fish scale until I took a closer look under the microscope. And here are some bryzoans (that’s what I think they’re called). Im sorry about my very limited knowledge of these kinds of fossils. More pictures coming . That little tooth above was the second of the only three teeth I’ve found after a month of hunting. The third was so small that I think if it wasn’t originally adhered to the matrix, then it would have fallen through the sieve mesh.
  13. Whitby finds

    As we haven’t been able to get out to the coast collecting we’ve been going through my daughter’s collection and trying to label her finds in the same way as her fossils from various shops. Many have already been identified here, but here are a few that I was hoping to get help with. I know all but one are ammonites but I was hoping for more specific than that. All are from the stretch of Yorkshire coast from Staithes down to Saltwick Bay Thanks in advance
  14. Tyrolian belemnite

    atractitoa3988d.pdf Nino Mariotti ,Johannes Pignatti Atractites Jeletzkyi,a new xiphoteuthidid coleoid from the Lower Lias of Tyrol,Austria Geol.Roman.v.32,1996 Locus typicus:Pfonsjoch holotype: five fragments,glued together telum reasonably complete @Heteromorph @FranzBernhard
  15. Hi Guys My son found this neat little fossil on the beach at Charmouth, Dorset, U.K. We had no clue what it was until we had it looked at by an expert at a fossil roadshow. We are considering removing some of the limestone matrix that hides some of the teeth. Do you think we should attempt to remove some of the matrix or is it too risky. There are several Hybodus shark teeth in what appears to be part of the jaw bone. With what I think is a limestone, type matrix covering some of the fossil. None of the teeth can be seen in full. I have some experience using fine hand held electric carving tools. And it would be very interesting to see more of the teeth. What do you think ? Thank you for looking at this for us. Matt
  16. Good afternoon folks. I have what was identified as a Sauropod coprolite (1 of 5) from the Morrison Formation, Henry Mountains, Wayne County, Hanksville, Utah. Jurassic period (Per the seller's description). I purchased this back in 2000 and am requesting a verification so I can ensure my ID card is correct. All help is appreciated. Measurements are 8.5Cm W, 6.0Cm H, 4.5Cm D.
  17. Sometimes I find things in nature on my own, sometimes I purchase things. This I purchased at a fossil and mineral show. I believe it's important to support such shows to keep them going. This is a nice ammonite, I guess some 165 million year-old I suspect this one is from the Jurassic period--it was collected in Madagascar. I've brought this little guy to some small classes I used to teach. It is about 9 inches across.
  18. Foster, J., Pagnac, D. and Hunt-Foster, R., 2020. An unusually diverse northern biota from the Morrison Formation (Upper Jurassic), Black Hills, Wyoming. Geology of the Intermountain West, 7, pp.29-67. DOI: https://doi.org/10.31711/giw.v7.pp29-67 https://giw.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/GIW/article/view/69 PDF: https://giw.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/GIW/article/view/69/87 Yours, Paul H.
  19. U. Toarcian french ammos

    Hi guys I was wondering if you could provide me with any more info than tha label provides thanks
  20. Mammal tooth

    Hi everyone, I recently found this tooth in some material i collected last month and I’m pretty sure it’s a tooth, maybe mammal. Can anyone ID it to a species or genus level? It was found in the bathonian forest marble formation of Dorset, UK. Thanks .
  21. What is it

    found in south western wyoming can anyone identify?
  22. ammonites

    hi guys and girls i would really appreciate some help identifying these ammonites that i've had sitting around for a while now the first one comes from the inferior oolite of burto bradstock and the second could be lissoceras oolithicum,??? oborne wood, sherbourne. dorset, jurassic, inferior oolite, polygyralis zone
  23. UK Ichthyosaur or Pliosaur Tooth

    Hello, I recently got a hold of this tooth from an old collection in the UK. I am unsure if this tooth wouldve come from a ichthyosaur or a pliosaur since the root is absent and I'm not expert in this material, so any feedback that help figure this tooth out is appreciated.
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