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Found 144 results

  1. Mystery Shark Tooth

    Hi all, I recently went on a trip to Brownie's Beach in Maryland in search of Hemies, and I came home with some pretty good little teeth and a few decent sized ones. However, there was one tooth that I found I could not identify. I am not really sure what shark it belongs to, it sort of resembles a sand tiger but the root is very robust and thick. Im more or less lost as to what it could be. Wishful thinking, but I thought it might be a baby megatooth shark or a mako or something along the lines of that. Its a long shot, but I thouht i would ask to see if anyone else could Identify it, haha!
  2. rapp beach hunting

    High water (east wind pushing salt water up the river) but fairly clear. Spent a few hours starting at low tide. Not much debris on the beach, guessing stuff was sand covered. Used a lot of bug spray, but bright sun and a light west breeze kept the no-seeums away. My luck continues the same; decent yellow mako, but broken. A small prettier mako. Bunch of triangular grey shark, bunch of sand tiger spikes (did find an interesting pottery shard and some weird drift wood). Actually ended up with over twice as many teeth as I thought, but no shrimp coprolites or even batoid stuff. Nice day and a bit of exercise. Fun watching the ospreys (getting to be friction between them and the eagles).Need to find some cowshark teeth.
  3. Oh, and one other tooth that I (actually my dig-happy girlfriend found the Tiger) found at Ernst yesterday. It looks like a relatively common lower Mako, but has such a bulbous root on it that I originally thought it was the elusive Paratodus Benendeni. However, it not having a bourlette leads me to believe that it's truly a false, False Mako. Thoughts? The blue cube is 1" square. Many thanks. I just realized that the false False Mako even has a false bourlette (Mineral staining) on it.
  4. Hey TFF Members! Back with another video. Cris and I recently headed to one of our creek sites with a very limited time to hunt, so the only thing to do.... dig like maniacs for a couple hours! Given the amount of time we had, we didn't do bad at all! I am in love with the beautiful blue Mako I found. I also found an awesome Dugong skull cap. These short spontaneous trips are incredibly fun. Give it a watch when you get a chance!
  5. 5800-1357824607.jpg

    From the album Belgium

    Big hastalis over 8,2cm or 3,2 inch from hoevenen antwerp only took me 15 years
  6. 5800-1357824444.jpg

    From the album Belgium

    big one
  7. rapp creek hunting

    Combined teeth from two trips, first to the creek, then to the beach. Quantity was better in the creek at least for small and broken teeth. Found a 1 1/2" pretty mako/great white on the beach, a few shrimp coprolite burrows, and the porpoise tooth. Cowshark from the usual spot, but broken, tips missing. Some drum teeth and a few angel shark teeth as well, and a neat little 'winged' vertebra, may take some more photos. Lots of people out with the nice weather. Don't think the fish are biting although the ospreys are very active, may switch to fishing from tooth hunting soon.
  8. Hop 5 03/02/19

    1. Isurus desori: Awesome Mako, just shy of two inches. One of my largest teeth from Bayfront Park. Found within 10 or 15 minutes of stepping foot on the beach. 2. Notorynchus primigenius: Very nice cow shark tooth. Small ding on the first cusp, but mostly complete and a decent size. 3. Cetacean Vertebra: My first whale vert! This lumbar vertebra was completely buried in the sand, with only the very top exposed. 4. Hemipristis serra: Really cool snaggletooth with nice colors and perfect serrations. Could be either an upper or lower, hard to tell. Most likely upper. 5. Cetacean Vertebra: Another whale vert! This one is an atlas vert, and like the first was found almost completely buried. Very much intact, maybe even museum quality. Please cast your vote! The poll ends at 1:00 p.m. EST. Also, if you haven't already, be sure to check out my YouTube video so you can see these fossils as they were found! The link to the video is in my most recent trip report, titled "Bayfront Park 03/02/19: First YouTube Video"
  9. I have detailed our shark education program in previous posts but I forgot the best part. Fossils on Wheels has around 350-400 shark teeth that will be given away to kids. All of these come from donations. My son and I have donated around half and the rest have come from donors on TFF, who we have thanked in previous posts. These are really my favorite fossils because they serve a higher purpose. Getting kids interested in science, natural history, fossils and of course, SHARKS !!! I write a lot in these posts but the core of what we do is summarized above. This is fun and we are feel lucky to be doing this. The donations from TFF members are allowing us to do this and the kids will know it. Thanks to donations of marine invertebrate fossils, these teeth are going to become fossil starter kits with other fossils mixed in. The pictured below are some of the fossils. Some STH mako teeth and about 100 Squalicorax teeth are not in the picture because they are in my laundry room at the moment. Tomorrow, I start bagging these and putting together information cards so I wll know exactly how many fossil start kits we will have in a day or two. We have a nice mix Moroccan Squalicorax, Sand Tiger teeth and Otodus teeth, a significant number of STH mako teeth, teeth from a few smaller STH shark species, a few Ptychodus, and a few Goblin Shark teeth. We are trying to make sure we give away teeth from species we cover in the presentation. THANK YOU FOSSIL FORUM MEMBERS for helping us make this happen
  10. Hey TFF members! Some friends visited us from out of state and we had a great time showing them the amazing fossils that Florida has to offer. They also got to experience our whacky winters with it being 85 degrees in February! I was born in a Michigan... I'm not complaining! We found some awesome stuff though, so I hope you can give the video a watch when you have some time. This was such a fun one!
  11. Fossils on Wheels got our first donations of fossil materials for our education program this week. My son and I have donated some of our fossils and loaned the rest. Since we are applying for a 501c3, we have to keep careful track of our fossils. IF they are paid for by Fossils on Wheels money, they belong to Fossils on Wheels. If they are purchased with our money, we donate and loan. Donations belong to Fossils on Wheels, not my son and I. I think that clarification is a good thing to let people know about because donations come from our new friends private collections and they are given with the intention of being used for education and given to the kiddos we educate. My son and I do not sell fossils. Fossils on Wheels will not be legally able to sell fossils. We will also not be trading donated fossils. They are strictly for education purposes. If you do donate fossils, we can track how they are used and verify where they end up. We had two donations this week and we want to thank our donors. The first donation was from @JBMugu and included a lot of shark teeth and mammal bones from Sharktooth Hill a.k.a Round Mountain Silt. Most of the teeth will be given to students from Paradise and Chico schools. A small number will stay in the program for shark tooth ID labs. A couple dozen of the teeth are headed to the Gateway Science Museum as a separate donation. The mammal bones will be used in our intermediate school education programs that focus on classification and evolution. All of these fossils, except for one ear bone, will be used for hands on exploration of fossils. The ear bone, I think it is from a small Odontoceti, will be used as a presentation piece for the evolution lab. We also got a donation of some super cool shark teeth from @caldigger and information explaining some of the differences in the fossilization process and why different fossils from different locations look different. We do want to explore the process of fossilization and how geology lets us learn about the natural history of the planet. This donation included a super cool split tooth that shows in the process perfectly. These teeth are for the presentation and the kids will get to handle a few of them in ID labs as well. We just wanted to thank our donors and to let our fellow TFF members know how much these donations help us with our goal is bringing fossil education to our local children. The first picture is various verts from STH. The large one, bottom left, is a cetacean. It looks very similar to a couple of Tiphyocetus verts from STH that i have. There is another large one which I would think would be cetacean. The smaller mammal verts I am not sure about. There is also a shark vert. Second picture is STH shark teeth. There C. hastalis, planus, plus a few tiger sharks and a few I am unsure about right now. Some still have STH dirt on them and I am thinking about having kids clean them during a lab. The third picture is the shark teeth from @caldigger including our first Pygmy White Shark teeth from morocco, some beautiful mako teeth and a few others that I need to ID.
  12. Our final stop in the Shark program is of course the giant Sharks of the Miocene. We wrap our adventure through the timeline of shark evolution by giving the kids what they expect to see, big shark teeth. Truthfully, we do not have many large shark teeth. I went for interesting teeth not big teeth but we have a few that will grab the kids attention. We give a very brief introduction to the giant sharks with a 2 inch Otodus tooth. We can spend too much time on Otodus or the ancestors of Megalodon as it just do not have time ( plus we do not have teeth from Auriculatus, Angustidens, or Chubutensis). After that brief bit, we ask the kids a question.... What shark is the ancestor of the modern Great White ? We give the kids a chance to answer that question for themselves by connecting them to the sharks that swimming in the ocean off the coast of California 12 million years. I want to explore the origins of the most well known modern shark and connect them to the fossil rich area just 6 or so hours south of where they live so we journey to Sharktooth Hill to finish the program. Isurus planus was a fairly large shark and probably reached lengths of over 20 feet. I have not found a lot of material about planus but I would think that based on tooth size, 20 feet seems possible. I have seen 2 inch planus teeth though I have nothing that big myself. We also show the kids a couple Isurus desori teeth only to mention that they MIGHT be related to modern Short-fin Makos. We then jump into another species that is present at STH and the one the kiddos will be most familiar with, Megalodon. This is obviously a super important species to talk about because it is the most popular prehistoric shark. It is the T-rex of sharks. Biggest teeth of any shark found so far. Most likely the largest shark ever and quite possibly the largest fish. They ate whales. They were also common and the apex predator in the worlds oceans during their time. We do not know what they look like but my son is working on his version of Megalodon and it has elements of a basking shark to it along with the traditional Great White like appearance. I will tell the kids that for a long time, Megalodon was thought to be the ancestor of great whites but science has uncovered another possible contender for being the ancestor of great whites. Carcharodon hastalis was a large shark that probably reached 30 feet in length. They had large teeth and were probably fast swimming ambush predators. I remember reading somewhere, that evidence existed from STH that the Broad-tooth White Shark hunted early pinnipeds from underneath, just as modern white sharks do. I can not remember where I read that and I want to track that down again to verify before saying that to kids. Anyway, we explain that they were probably very similar in appearance to great whites and filled a similar ecological role. I will add that transitional teeth have been found that are a pretty conclusive link the chain of white shark evolution but we want them to check out the teeth and judge for themselves. Our presentation teeth Pic 1 I. planus and I. desori. These are not the exact teeth for program. I do have a few bigger teeth but these were in my desk as I am doing this lol Pic 2 Our 5.08 inch Megalodon tooth and the tooth that I suspect will be the most popular in the presentation. Not the prettiest nor the biggest but it is still a really big tooth to me. We also use a 3 inch tooth for the presentation but I did not photograph it. Pic 3 a 2 inch hastalis, a 2.5 inch hastalis, and one that I personally think is cooler than even Megalodon, a 2.54 inch Great White. It is blue. It just looks cool and I think 2.54 is pretty large for a white shark tooth. We wrap it up with questions from the kids while we go around the classroom handing out shark teeth to the students. If you happened to read all of these, you are a good soul because these are long winded posts I know lol Thank you to all who commented and offered encouragement. I will probably start putting up the marine mammal stuff next.
  13. This was a prep I've last year, but for some reason I've never posted it on the forum. So I thought I might change that. Last year I was fortunate enough to take a visit to the Ernst Quarries and dig for some shark teeth. Although most of the fossil I've taken home are either bones, four partial regular-sized teeth, and mostly tiny partials (some of which I accidentally damaged while digging ), the biggest find of the day was this large Cosmopolitodus hastalis tooth with its crown partially sticking out of the matrix. When Rob noticed the tooth, he initially estimated it to be ~2 inches long and insisted that I keep the tooth in the matrix, saying something like "The tooth itself is worth about $15. If you keep the tooth in the matrix, it'll be worth $60". Although my reason for visiting the Ernst Quarries was to find shark teeth to keep rather than to sell, I for some reason decided to keep the tooth in the matrix. However, I still had to prep this baby when I got home! Below is the tooth how I found it. This was going to be my first (and so far only considerate) prep I've ever done. Rob told me that the matrix can easily be scratched away using a fingernail and so taking his words and some advice I've gotten from the forum regarding something else, I grabbed one of my mom's needles and started quite literally digging off the siltstone. After around 10 minutes, a perfect root base showed up. This tooth is obviously going to be a perfect whole, so you just gotta keep scraping off the matrix. One really helpful thing I've realized at this point is that the needle I was using was perfect for such beginner's prep- it was strong enough to remove matrix effectively but not enough to do any damage to the tooth itself.
  14. North Carolina hollow shark tooth

    I found this hollow mako shark tooth on the piles in North Carolina, I was told that the tooth hadn’t fully formed when the shark lost it but I want a few more opinions on it. Size referencefront
  15. Hop 5 01/25/19

    (I will now be using the poll format, so you can actually click your favorite and the poll will keep track of the votes) 1. Carcharocles chubutensis: MY FIRST MEGATOOTH! A bit of damage near the root and a missing bourlette, but a gorgeous tooth nonetheless. The serrations are absolutely killer. It’s about 1 ¾ inches. Colors completely changed when it dried. I. Am. Ecstatic. 2. Carcharias cuspidata: Very large sand tiger with a beautiful hooked double cusp on one shoulder. Excellent preservation, and certainly a necklace quality tooth. 3. Notorynchus primigenius: A perfect little cow shark tooth. Found in the cove within my first five minutes of collecting. Not very big, but in fantastic condition. 4. Isurus desori: Incredible little mako. It is absolutely pristine, and still sharp enough to cut you. Has that beautiful Brownies blue coloration on the enamel. 5. Carcharocles sp.: Oh, what could have been...this is the tip to what was probably a huge Megalodon tooth. Based on the thickness of the tooth, it would have been much larger than the meg that I found. Still a great find! The tip of a monster.
  16. Good day all! Spent a couple hours down at the beach (Milnerton,Cape Town) yesterday - unfortunately it was a bit of a quite day. Only came across one tooth and some interesting bones I wasn’t able to identify.
  17. Hey TFF members! Cris and I got out to explore a brand new site for us recently, and it did not disappoint. This was a scouting trip so we didn't find as much as usual, but we will definitely be going back soon now that we had a chance to figure out the site a bit. This video is pretty eventful, from me wearinf a duck mask and playing a banjo, to Cris buying me a gift, to finding some really cool fossils in an interesting location! Give the video a watch if you're interested and have some time!
  18. rapp beach hunting

    Was curious to see what had washed up on the beach. Weather was dominated by east winds and usually north winds bring in the most stuff. From my finds it appears that a lot of sand was deposited covering, sadly, most shark teeth. Did find several shrimp(?) coprolite "burrows" (which I had not seen much until my previous trip?) @Plax @Carl @GeschWhat Found only four shark teeth- - a medium Mako, a rootless Hemipristis, a sand tiger and a broken sand tiger (initially thought it was something more interesting, the break was polished smooth by the sand). Found my second piece of skate plate, with two teeth, but not as pretty as the first), and lots of small "whale bone". Pottery shards as well, but shells for the most part were sand covered with the presumptive teeth. Nice weather before the rains (and south winds which don't deposit much).
  19. Calvert Cliffs 2018

    So i dont post all the time anymore but as we approach the end of the year i always like to organize my finds and do a calendar. Well here are my finds for 2018 not a bad year and a found my benedini which is the rarest of the rare for Calvert. If anybody is interested in a calendar let me know i'm all done except for December still trying to find a couple more good finds! Hope everybody had a great 2018 and here is to an awesome 2019!!!!
  20. Is this a Mako?

    Found this shark tooth in Parrish Florida. Is it an extinct giant Mako?
  21. Carcharodon hastalis 03

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Carcharodon hastalis Savannah River Savannah, Georgia

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  22. Shark Tooth Color

    Shark teeth that change color.. Here is one... a Mako. A Photo taken within 10 minutes of removing from a heavy blanket of mud, gravel, clay mixture. This tooth had not seen daylight in a couple of million years. Then a photo of the same tooth 2 hours later when I arrived home. Yes I applied water, then oil and neither the blade or especially the root darkens again.. If some type of organism that dies/fade in sun light, how about this hemi that came from the exact same location. Why is the root still black? Figure this will be a good discussion for shark experts.
  23. Summerville September 14 2018

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    Carcharodon hastalis Summerville, South Carolina

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  24. rapp creek hunting

    Finally got out to the creek in the woods. Warm and cloudy, but not many bugs (or frogs). Looked like lots of people had been hunting, but the main creek body was less silted than previously, shells everywhere (in addition to giant tree oysters, scallops, frilly oysters, there were some extra elongated "clams"? ) I had to shovel out lots of broken shells in my spots, and the teeth, as always, were small. Still it was good to get some angel shark teeth and drum teeth again (rare on the beach) and there were a fair amount of tiny teeth. Found one smallish mako/ great white (1" but in perfect shape). Odd in that many teeth were reddish/ pinkish; often I see the tips but not so many teeth that color (guess good for jewelry?) After three hours of digging and sifting, I decided it was time to go, but decided to try a favorite old spot where I have found several cow shark teeth, and voila! first shovelful yielded a beautiful (a bit small) intact cowshrk tooth with root. Good time to stop (probably sore tomorrow). Good relaxing trip!
  25. Extinct Mako?

    I am thinking that this may be an extinct Mako such as Isurus Hastalis. Can anyone confirm this or have a better opinion? It is from the Cooper River of South Carolina. Thanks, Jamie
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