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Found 58 results

  1. When I found this humerus in Sacha's Merritt Island matrix (aka Frog Toe matrix), I remembered a post from @Harry Pristis regarding the EECF of a similar bone. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/67182-miocene-mystery-bone/#comment-705462 I wonder if it can be ID'd further. If the entepicondylar foramen is present in opossums, shrews, moles, mustelids, and raccoons, those are the possibilities to consider. I think that it is too large to belong to a shrew and too gracile to be that of a mole. If from a raccoon or opossum, it would have to be a very young one. So that leaves a very small skunk or a weasel. I am leaning towards a weasel, but would love to have confirmation. Is the bone too beat up to ID?
  2. Here is a series of five images showcasing some of my finds from the first hunt through the Merritt Island matrix. I have just begun to study the fossils in this intriguing matrix, and hope that I haven't got too many wrong. There are so many possibilities when you find a bone in this stuff. It might be mammal, or reptile...amphibian, or even fish. The variety is one thing I wanted to showcase. Of course, the amphibian fossils are the really exciting finds, but they are the most difficult to identify. These images will be featured on episode 5 of 'Fossil Hunters'. continued in next reply
  3. A few weeks ago I submitted a request for ID on a couple of tiny bones from TFF member Sacha's Merritt Island Pleistocene matrix. http:// Small Pleistocene bone for ID - Fossil ID - The Fossil Forum The help that I received was based on the limited photos that I supplied. Lateral views alone just don't cut it! I was not satisfied with 'mouse', so I 'dug' a little deeper. I decided to re-photograph a few of the odd little bones in different aspects this time. Duh... my results really do illustrate the importance of showing the 'ends' of a bone. It was very obvious from my new photos that these are vertebrae. Then came hours of research and many PDF downloads. Turns out that these cool little bones are autotomous lizard caudal vertebrae. There seem to be at least two kinds in the matrix possibly representing different species (or positions in the tail). I have included some of the links to helpful papers on the subject. http://‎www.scielo.br/pdf/aabc/v87n1/0001-3765-aabc-201520130298.pdf http://The Anatomy and Histology of Caudal Autotomy and Regeneration in Lizards (PDF Download Available) http://Lizard Caudal Vertebrae on JSTOR
  4. I posted this Pleistocene fossil last week. I found it in TFF member Sacha's Florida micro matrix from a spoil island in the Indian River. I could not find a match in any of my books, but I did find it in a PDF! I don't know that it is the species that I selected to compare, but I am happy to call it 'snake'. The 'unknown' that I originally posted: The match that I found: The figure that I found:
  5. I am re-posting this as it got lost in the upgrade last Sunday. I could use some help on this one which I think is a cranial element. It was found in TFF member Sacha's Florida Pleistocene Merritt Island matrix. As I previously noted, the preservation may look a bit like fish, but a lot of the amphibian finds from this matrix have a similar appearance, so I don't want to rule anything out. Thanks for looking.
  6. I was searching some of the Merritt Island micro matrix (the famous "frog toe" matrix) I had gotten from tff member Sacha when I found this tooth: It's about 21 mm. long, and it is from the Late Pleistocene Melbourne Bone Bed near Merritt Island, Florida. I was initially very surprised! How did this relatively large tooth end up in a bag of microfossil matrix? I think it is some sort of canid or felid canine tooth. I'm not very good with mammal teeth, so I would appreciate any help with identification.
  7. This tooth was found in Sacha's Merritt Island, Florida (Pleistocene) matrix. It is in pretty good shape... the roots are odd. Any ideas? Julianna
  8. Can anyone help with the ID of this, what looks to be a tiny bone from the Pleistocene Merritt Island matrix. Jill
  9. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    An unknown claw from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  10. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    Another pic of the vole tooth.
  11. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    One of the vole teeth I've found in this matrix, from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  12. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    Another view of the stingray spine.
  13. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    A rather broken stingray spine from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  14. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    The third picture of the Spotted Seatrout otolith.
  15. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    Another picture of the Spotted Seatrout otolith.
  16. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    I believe this is the otolith of a Spotted Seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) or a similar species from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old. Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  17. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    The third pic of the sheepshead tooth.
  18. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    Another pic of the sheepshead tooth.
  19. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    A tooth from a fish known as the Sheepshead (Archosargus sp.) from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  20. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    Another pic of the third rodent incisor. This is from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  21. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    One of the many rodent incisors I've found in this matrix. This is from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  22. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    Another pic of the second rodent incisor. This is from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  23. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    One of the many rodent incisors I've found in this matrix. This is from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.
  24. From the album Pleistocene Microfossils from Merritt Island, Florida

    One of the many rodent incisors I've found in this matrix. This is from the Melbourne Bone Bed (10,000 - 20,000 years old). Found in microfossil matrix gathered from a dredge spoil island near Merritt Island, Florida.