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Found 170 results

  1. This report is long overdue, but I thought might be worth posting based on the response to the rolling auction items currently up for bid... In the early summer of 2017 my family and I set out on a 7000+ mile roadtrip through 21 states. The trip gave me the opportunity to collect at a couple of famous sites like the Kemmerer's green river formation and wheeler shale in Utah, but one stop combined fossil collecting with some of the most beautiful countryside I've had the opportunity to experience. Big Cedar Ridge is a late cretaceous deposit near Worland, WY. The plant fossils are plentiful but delicate in a light gray matrix, I say "in" rather than "on" because the fossils were the result of a large ash fall that buried the foliage where it stood so the fossils are often in 3 dimensions rather than simply found on horizontal planes. To say it's off the beaten path is an understatement, but it's well worth the effort. Make sure you pay attention to the weather, pack appropriately and make sure your spare tire is in good repair... just in case. We started out early from a bed and breakfast at the base of Devil's Tower (thanks to @minnbuckeye's recommendation). After a 3+ hour drive we got to a spot where I thought the road should be a little past Ten Sleep, but there were no road markers to be found. We went a little further before turning around and taking the unmarked dirt road we initially passed. We didn't see another car once we made the turn so make sure you have everything you need. The drive is 15 miles of dirt roads through BLM cattle grazing land.
  2. Hope some of the UK members can be of assistance. I want to go on my first collecting trip this summer, and have been doing a bit of research. One of my main interests is plants. I live in Hertfordshire, and the nearest location I can find that has plant material is Betteshanger in Kent. It's over 200 miles round trip, so not that close to me. Has anyone collected there? Did you come away with a decent number of finds. Does anyone know of any plant locations nearer to me? Thanks
  3. Hello, I have a few Carboniferous pieces for trade - the black ones come from Knurów, the reddish - from Czerwionka (both locations in Poland). These are all of them: And here some close-ups: Front Back
  4. Fern Seeds

    I was reading one of my textbooks and specifically a chapter about the Carboniferous. There was a photo of seeds next to ferns and I was surprised about how large they were compared to common fern leaves. Then I remembered when peeling up shale/slate in the local stream, I found a rock with several oval pebbles. I thought maybe these were rocks or concretions. After seeing the photo, are some of these perhaps seeds? They also have a line that seems to split them laterally.
  5. Last week took a short drive (11 miles of road and 3 on beach) to our local fossil area. 99.9% of our finds are plant parts. Mostly Alder and Willow leaves with some Meta Sequoia tossed in. Some times a birch leaf will find its way in. In the right rocks I've found a number of what I believe are alder cones as well.. After I get back home I'll start working on IDs. Unfortunately the literature is scant but was given one that has some local info. Some planes will have single leaves in good shape. While others are stacked on top of each other but the leaves are damaged. It looks like they preserved after they started to rot. There are other areas with a wider selection of leaves but you have to take a boat. And with our tide changes (between 7-25ft) it can take some planning. I will add more once back home and can work on more photos
  6. The Bad Bush

    Here is a 300lb slab of rock I chisled out of my back yard that has a bush on it from the carboniferous this is in Lincoln County WV, Iron pyrite and quarts sandstone medium sizes grains matrix
  7. Fossil hunting in the Santonian - lower Campanian Geistthal-formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach, Eastern Alps (Styria, Austria) As a whole, the Gosau basin of Kainach - St. Bartholomä is not very fossiliferous. In contrast to the St. Bartholomä-formation with its rudists etc., the other, much more extensive formations, especially the very extensive, somewhat tubititic Afling-formation, are generally very poor in fossils. Some are known, eg. ammonites, but their occurrences are rather elusive. One exception - or at least in part - are Trochactaeon snails. They are known since the beginning of geological documentation of the area (around 1850), but only as loose pieces. It took until about the 1960ies for the first finds of this snails in outcrops. However, only a few sentences were (repeatedly) published since then, only a list of the species is given (without any description), and also no detailed description of the occurrences and their exact locations. That´s the sad side. The good side is: There is at least one (permanent) occurrence of this snails in an outcrop at a major road! This occurrence is at the red X... Part of Geofast-map (left, squares are 2x2 km) and geological overview from Ebner (2000) (right). There seems to be not much correspondence between these maps. For orientation, see village Geistthal in upper part of both maps. ...and it is featured in an excursion guide from 2015 (from Hubmann & Gross, 2015): The snails are located in the upper part of the Geistthal-formation, a succession of gray conglomerates, sandstones and siltstones with very occasional thin coal layers and thin beds of calcareous onkoids. The lower part of the Geistthal-formation is a coarse-grained, red conglomerate; its the basal formation of the Gosau basin of Kainach. I have visited this outcrop in December 2015, and yes, the snails are still there.
  8. Plant fossils from Texas

    Found these plant fossils along with calamities. Need help in identifying. Found in north Texas in the Mingus Formation, Pennsylvanian, along a river bed. Thanks in advance for your assistance.
  9. Turning Lemons into Limes

    Here are some more Miocene plant fossils from lake sediments north of Phoenix, Arizona. The first large piece of brownish chert, a lemon, had poorly preserved stems. Because the lake sediments had abundant uranium, the rock glowed bright lime green under short wave UV light. Organic matter often attracts uranium deposition.The second piece in the third photo has a great impression of plants that looks like it could have been created in fresh concrete yesterday. Field of view in all photos 6-9cm long.
  10. Oviatt Creek Idaho

    Hi all, I am curious if anyone here has any experience at the Oviatt Creek Fossil Beds outside of Moscow, Idaho. I did not find any information on the Fossil Forum and an internet search turned up a only a few papers and more questions than answers. The composition of this area may be similar to the more famous Clarkia fossil beds. It seems that the Oviatt Creek beds used to belong to the United States Forest Service, but may have been turned over to the Potlach Timber company. Has this impacted recreational, non-vertebrate hounding? A call to the local Forest Service Ranger Station may be in order if no one here has any insight. Thanks!
  11. Fossil IDs (if possible)

    I like collecting fossils, but I usually am not sure what my finds are. Please, could you help me identify these fossils? I noted down some possibilities down below. 1 - could be a late Albian ammonite from central Serbia, but I am not entirely sure. Acquired in Serbia. 2 - Found at Southerndown, Wales. Could it be a tree root or something in the region of that? It has a cross-hatched pattern if you look closely. 3 & 4 - A shell I found at Penarth, Wales but I am not entirely sure what it is called. 5 - A bone I found in the mud at Tites Point, Severn, Gloucestershire. maybe a birds? 6 - Some shells I found in mudstone at Charmouth, England. Was found in the same stone as 7. 7 - wood I found at Charmouth? It was very crumbly and delicate. 8 - A Trilobite fragment possibly, Llanfawr quarries, Wales. 9 - A bivalve I found in Southerndown. Not sure what it is though.
  12. https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-00744-3
  13. Miocene Plants in Lacustrine Formation

    I found these in a Miocene lake bed formation northeast of Phoenix, Arizona. The lake beds are deposited along with volcanic rocks and are probably part of the Chalk Canyon Formation. The lake beds have pieces of agatized plant material. Any ideas of what the plants might be? I am especially interested in the molds of a jointed plant shown in the first three photos. @paleoflor Photo about 6cm high. Detail of first photo. Filled center of plant stem ~0.7mm. Depressed mold of stem ~ 3mm across. Height of photo ~2.5cm. Detail of first photo. Center of stem ~ 1mm. Mold of stem ~3mm across. Length of stem ~5.5cm. Bunch of stems average of 5mm across. Cross section of above photo. Typical stems each about 2 - 4mm across. Possible stromatolite/algae structure.
  14. I went last weekend for a new carboniferous hunt with few nice finds
  15. L.S., To liberate storage space, I would like to offer the following plant fossils for trade. All specimens below come from the Late Carboniferous of the Piesberg quarry near Osnabrück (Germany). Scale on photographs in centimetres (1 inch = 2.54 cm). Specimens B, C, F and G show neuropterid fronds of various sizes (most likely Laveineopteris rarinervis). Note specimens B and G were recovered broken and have been glued/repaired. Specimen E is a large plate and shows reproductive structures of Calamites (E-1), a Laveineopteris frond (E-2), a strap-like Cordaites leaf, and some Annularia-like leaf whorls. If interested, I could also offer the counterpart of E. If preferable, I can cut specimen F to size (currently large slab of rock for the actual imprint). In general, please note that these specimens are rather large and heavy (I will cover the shipping costs, but you will need space to display these pieces). In return, I would be mainly interested in plant fossils from the Devonian to Cretaceous (but feel free to offer younger material also). Kind regards, Tim Specimen B: Specimen C: Specimen E: Specimen F: Specimen G:
  16. http://www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/news/2019/january/a-tiny-fossil-amoeba-is-helping-us-to-understand-how-plants-firs.html
  17. Does anyone know of some good fossil sites in the Phoenix area, or within a couple of hours drive? Will be spending a couple of months there. Atrypa
  18. I went saturday on my fav carbobiniferous sites to find few fossils,a lot of mud and water,but few good rewards
  19. Mazon Creek fossil plants: Part 1

    Hi guys! Long story short, a rather large collection of Mazon Creek fossils has been donated to my university. I thought I'd share some pictures of the collection and confirm some preliminary identifications. There are a lot of specimens so I will probably split this into two posts. Annularia radiata Annularia stellata A whole bunch of Annularia stellata?
  20. Seed Fossil?

    These 2 are part of a many (50 or more) fossils/imprints I found in a creek bed on a visit this summer to our family farm in Ritchie County, WV. Since we're going back for a visit next week, I thought I'd try to ID these now and look for more while I'm there again. The bulk of the fossils/imprints I've ID'd as ferns, and maybe lycophytes (if my research so far is correct) but can't find anything on the imprints in the attached photos. I'm new to plant fossils, so would appreciate some help in ID'ing this set. Here's what I know: All the fossils/imprints I found, including the attached, were in the same 3-4 meter area along a shallow (1-1.5 meter high) creek bank in Ritchie County, WV; They were found in thick sheets of wet, muddy shale; and The 2 imprints in the photos fit into one another as a match/pair. Here are my questions: What are/were the 2 ovals that fit into one another in the photos? Is there anything else of interest I should be noticing in the attached photos and/or in the other similar fossils/imprints I've found? Note that the last photo are the 2 pieces flipped over. Thanks in advance.
  21. Diplotmema dissectum

    Scale on photograph. The following classification scheme was adopted: Anderson, J.M., Anderson, H.M., and Cleal, C.J. (2007), Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology, Strelitzia 20, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria (LINK).
  22. Hi everyone! I am new here, and a newbie to fossil collecting in general. I have a question I haven’t quite been able to find answers to by searching on the site. Hope this is the right on the forum place to ask.... I have some fossils I am thinking of displaying in a dry aquarium, and I would like to add live plants in with them. Is this OK for the fossils? Will the moisture from watering plants harm them at all or cause any problems? (They’ve made it millions of years and I don’t want to damage them after all this time!) Thanks for any help!
  23. Medullosa leuckartii

    The following classification scheme was adopted: Anderson, J.M., Anderson, H.M., and Cleal, C.J. (2007), Brief history of the gymnosperms: classification, biodiversity, phytogeography and ecology, Strelitzia 20, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Pretoria (LINK).
  24. Hi, all, does anyone know where I can get/order some posters showing the Pennsylvanian forests? I am doing a presentation on plant fossils in Jan. and would like to accent it with art work, thanks, Herb
  25. I had the time today to make a new visit on the coal heap with few nice Neuropteris,pecopteris lepidodendron and Eusphenopteris finds but on the way back i made a stop in a wine shop where a 80 famous french actor sign is bottles a good way to finish the day
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