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Found 445 results

  1. Trilobite Hunt in NSW

    G'day everyone! I have reccently come back from a three day trip to Forbes with the Australian Fossil Club where we looked for Ordovician and Silurian trilobites. We checked out the Silurian Cotton Hill Quarry as well as some new Ordovician sites around the town of Gunningbland. Fellow forum member @Foozil was also apart of the trip. Over the three days I ended up with many beautiful trilobite fossils and my first whole specimens! @piranha could possibly help with IDs? DAY 1 - Cotton Hill Quarry Friday morning my dad and I left home at 3:30 AM and began the 7 and a half hour journey from Melbourne to Forbes in Central NSW. We arrived at the first site, Cotton Hill Quarry at around 12:30 and began digging. The fossils here come from the Cotton formation, approxomitely 435 million years old. The most common fossils at the site were bits of the Sinespinaspis markhami , a small odontopleurid trilobite. They were common fragmentary remains however whole ones were still uncommon to find. Unfortunately, the layer that the Australian Fossil Club used to dig was buried udner 1.5 metres worth of rock by the local council as they were looking to smoothen out the sides of the quarry and possibly revegetate most of the site. However we soon found the layer again and I found quite a few nice Sinespinaspis markhami. After 5 hours of digging, we went home and prepared for the next day ahead. The Quarry Sinespinaspis markhami
  2. Today I had the great pleasure of spending 9 hours with Fossil Forum Member @Monica while we visited Dave's Down To Earth Rock Shop and Prehistoric Museum in Evanston, Illinois and then we drove 90 miles NW of Chicago to the Burpee Museum in Rockford, Illinois. Monica flew from Ontario, Canada on Friday with her husband to attend the Stars Wars Celebration at the McCormick Place. Today she set time aside for me so we could do some Fossil stuff while here husband went back to the convention. After picking her up from her downtown hotel, we drove North on Lake Shore Drive so I could show her the lakefront. After a couple quick stops, we made a detour to my sons house so I could drop off a new Lego Jurassic Park Set for my 5 year old Grandson, that's as far as he goes with fossil related stuff. After this we had a 15 minute drive to Dave's Rock Shop, this was the first time that Monica has been to a Fossil Store and this is a great one to visit.. This post will be picture heavy. Dave's Down to Earth Rock Shop- The below pictures are just some of the fossils that are for sale, I will then post some of the fossils that are in the stores downstairs museum. I am not one for pictures, but had to take one to for the post.
  3. I just went to the Floyd county Conasauga at a roadside site mentioned in https://www.researchgate.net/publication/264495630_Taxonomy_and_biostratigraphic_significance_of_some_Middle_Cambrian_Trilobites_from_the_Conasauga_Formation_in_western_Georgia (partly guided by a few locals). After searching, we found tons of nodules, and only a few exposed Trilo parts. It was only near the end of the trip that I realized that at this site, I might need to split the nodules open to find much in them. So I took a few decent sized ones with me to figure out what to do with them after I attempted to split a few, and only getting one open relaitively cleanly (nothing inside). My immediate assumption is perhaps to use the freeze/thaw method I've heard people use for mazon creek nodules (instructions?). Any other tips for splitting these nodules? They're much tougher that I personally thought they'd be (at least it was harder to actively split them on site, given their round shape makes it hard to keep the chisel going in one spot). The site: Some of the numerous nodules present:
  4. Last Saturday (April 6th, 2019) my wife and I made our second trip to Tully, NY to search for trilobite fossils. Unfortunately this was the second time I was unable to find a complete trilobite; I'll keep searching for them in other locations. I did find some other fossils that I thought were interesting enough to keep. The first photo is of the hill in Tully that I searched. On our first trip I tried to cover the entire hill while we were there, on our second trip I concentrated on smaller areas and had better results with finding fossils. A gastropod fossil which is next to another fossil that is round, flat and has a spiral pattern that is difficult to see in the photo. I found many brachiopods and some bivalves. This is the longest crinoid stem that I've found so far at Tully, it is about 13/4 inches in length. I'm guessing this is another crinoid stem. It has a much larger diameter than the other crinoid stems that I've found and it has "spikes". And two very small pieces of fossil from trilobites, which I was happy to find even though they are not complete. Thanks for looking.
  5. Trilobites

    This really cool trilobite came out of the wanakah shale of the Hamilton formation.
  6. So I just found out about two good fossil sites for trilobites only and hour away from my house! This is my first time going out looking for fossils ever and I am so excited! I gots me a spade, large flat head screw driver, thin pry bar, gloves and claw hammer. For prep tools I have an air scribe and compressor, steel dental/sculpting tools, mini files, polishing papers, and other small tools as I work with silver. The site is in Vermont and I am expecting wet, cool conditions. I wanted to get any tips or advice you may have for a first timer to help make my afternoon trip a success. Tri-Lo-Bites! (read as dine-o-mite!)
  7. So I am brand new to fossils and am having a hard time finding unprepared trilobites. I don't really have the ability to go hunt my own at this time but I want to get into preparation. I found the U-Dig site where I can order like 40lbs of shale but that's a bit much for me at the moment. I am just trying to find a few trilobites to get started and to get a feel for the tools and prepping. I was on online but had a hard time finding ones that had not already been prepped. Not to mention I have been warned about the risk of fraud buying trilobites on online. If anyone can direct me to where I can get some sweet rock bugs I would be very grateful!
  8. I visited a small Paleozoic (Silurian) coral reef in Indiana the other day. No earth-shattering, jaw-dropping discoveries, but it's an interesting spot with dolomitized fossils. Here's a google earth view of the center of the reef. A nice mollusk, if anyone knows what species, let me know. It shattered when I tried to extract it, but I was able to glue it back together as you can see here. Sphaerexochus romingeri cephalon After extraction.. I believe this is a Platyceras: To be continued..
  9. Trilobites in Norway

    This year's second hunt was successful, considering the snow. There is still a bit of snow covering some places. I was still lucky enough to find some ok fossils. The area where I found these trilobites is called fossildalen/fossilvalley in slemmestad (i`ve showed pictured from the area before). The fossils here in the area stem from the time periods of Cambrian, Ordovician and Silurian, a period of 541 million to 419 million years ago. At that time, Slemmestad was a seabed in a relatively shallow sea. The trilobites fossils I found are about 420 million years old I believe. I found around 10 trilobites or parts of them.
  10. Fossil hunt at St Leon Indiana today. One inch square for scale. 8 Flexicalymene. One so small I can't even believe I saw it. Some mini brachiopods, some small horn coral and some gastropods.
  11. Isotelus Trilo Spots?

    Just visited the American Museum of Natural History, and one piece I saw there was a pair of Ordovician Isotelus Trilobites:l (iowensis?) Seeing this, I remembered that Isotelus Trilos were something that I was looking for. Anyone know of a site in/near Georgia?
  12. Day Two ; Locality Two (or Seven if you include Day One) Prepping and Retail, Erfoud, Morocco. 20th February 2019 Erfoud town itself is famous for its beautiful fossils, its skilled fossil preppers and also for its wide variety of fakes, composites, good and bad repair jobs and utter frankenfossils. A large percentage of fossils from Morocco that are available in shops and on the internet the world over originate from here or pass through the place. Fossils are sent here for prepping from all over the south and then sent from here everywhere in the country and abroad. There are many little shops, prepping centres with huge attached shops and 'museums which are really pretty much just shops as well. Top Tip :The prices here are about ten times the price of the prices in the little shacks on the edge of town or elsewhere in Morocco, but haggling can reduce the cost significantly. Many places have 'fixed' prices, but they're actually always negotiable. This time, we went to the one my friend Anouar, who is a tour guide, takes his tourists and I was asked politely not to accuse the owners and chap who'd show us around and do the chat, of having fakes or wrong info, so i had to bite my lip. We asked if it was okay to take photos and they said yes, which I was surprised about, but I guess it was because Anouar was going to use photos for his own purposes and this would involve advertising the shop. Top Tip : You will see a lot of fixed prices in Moroccan Dirham in the pieces and shelves. Divide by ten to have a price in US dollars. Because we were with Anouar, we were told everything is 50% of the marked price, but I suspect they often do this anyway, "Special Berber prices, today only". I've heard that before. And you can still haggle to get something way under that 50% and you just know they'll still be making a good profit. I didn't buy anything. Little local stores are more my line anyway - I rarely shop in supermarkets. Here is the entrance where you can see huge plates ready for prepping and polishing, some have been cut into pieces and they glued back together it seems to me, I know this happens with the crinoid beds, so i guess it's true of the orthocerid and goniatite stuff too. Some just look cobbled together because of the circular saw marks when cutting out upper layers.With these, polishing will remove the grid lines. These sheets are from the local area and contain the goniatites and orthoconic nautiloids we were walking on earlier, but from a better quality, less eroded and distorted source. Famennian, Upper Devonian, I think. This photo shows one of the trenches they dig to reach the best quality material, similar to the ones i was walking along earlier this day : Below, somebody walking on the slabs and some maps of the the world at different times in it's past, showing continental drift. : Notice these are not the famous black orthocerid marbles that come from elsewhere. The picture of Spinosaurus is a bit misleading, as you all know, it's not found in these marbles or in the Erfoud area. In fact there is very little Kem Kem material available here these days, though there was in the past. I suspect the Kem Kem area probably has it's own facillities nowadays.
  13. Picked up a few goodies

    Just want others opinions if I got a good deal picking up all these the other day...
  14. 3 Isotelus Trilobites

    Had a great fossil expedition the other day. Found 3 rolled Isotelus trilobites.
  15. 3/27/2019 trilobite dig at Penndixie

    Great day overall found all of these plus a triple with 2 eldredgeops and 1 greenops which I gave to Devoniandigger to prepp
  16. 3/24/19

    Good day overall
  17. Collecting trilobites

    Hey! This might be the wrong thread/topic but here it goes. I recently started collecting different species of trilobites. It would have been interesting to see what species others have collected and whether you can refer to some species in a medium price range that is worth collecting. I have a desire to compile a list for myself with different species that I can follow. Someone who has / knows about fine trilobites that are worth collecting? These are the species I have collected so far: - Flexicalymene sp (morocco) - Flexicalymene retrorsa - Coltraneia oufatensis - Hollardops mesocristata - Hollardops sp. - Ductina vietnamica - Elrathia kingi - Different phacops sp. - andalusiana cambropallas - Some unidentified species (will be posting pictures, some of you probably know) Thanks!
  18. Help to ID Trilobites fron Wheeler Formation

    Hello friends, I need your help to learn a little more, I am not an expert in trilobites, in fact what I own are the Brachiopods, but accommodating my fossils, I found myself very similar and they filled me with doubts, can you could help me distinguish between an interstricted Peronopsis and a Ptychagnostus atavis, both of the Upper Cambrian, of the Wheeler Formation, in House Range, Millard county, Utah. Thank you.
  19. Reconstruction of trilobite ancestral range in the southern hemisphere January 10, 2019, FAPESP https://phys.org/news/2019-01-reconstruction-trilobite-ancestral-range-southern.html http://agencia.fapesp.br/reconstruction-of-trilobite-ancestral-range/29527/ Carbonaro, F.A., Langer, M.C., Nihei, S.S., de Souza Ferreira, G. and Ghilardi, R.P., 2018. Inferring ancestral range reconstruction based on trilobite records: a study-case on Metacryphaeus (Phacopida, Calmoniidae). Scientific reports, 8(1), p.15179. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/328251419_Inferring_ancestral_range_reconstruction_based_on_trilobite_records_a_study-case_on_Metacryphaeus_Phacopida_Calmoniidae https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-018-33517-5 Bolivian Trilobites - At The Top Of The World American Museum of Natural History https://www.amnh.org/our-research/paleontology/paleontology-faq/trilobite-website/trilobite-localities/bolivian-trilobites-at-the-top-of-the-world Gallery of the Devonian Trilobites of Bolivia https://www.amnh.org/our-research/paleontology/paleontology-faq/trilobite-website/trilobite-localities/bolivian-trilobites-at-the-top-of-the-world/gallery-of-the-devonian-trilobites-of-bolivia Yours, Paul H.
  20. Penn Dixie 2019 Dig With the Experts

    Tickets are almost sold out! Don't miss your chance! Join us for our signature event — Dig with the Experts! This is our very popular, once yearly opportunity to unearth the best, most complete, and most unexpected fossils at Penn Dixie. We’ll have equipment do the heavy lifting and scientific experts on site to help with locating and identifying the best fossils. You’ll have to do your share of splitting and digging, of course, but you’re guaranteed to find something cool and interesting. Saturday, May 18: 9 am to 4 pm Sunday, May 19: 9 am to 4 pm Monday, May 20: 9 am to 4 pm (limited staffing) Expert volunteers — including scientists, leading fossil collectors, and experts on local geology — will lead the dig in a freshly excavated section of the Lower Windom Shale and will demonstrate how to find Devonian Period trilobites, cephalopods, fish remains, brachiopods, corals, wood, and a range of other marine invertebrates. Thanks to our experts, we are celebrating our 15th dig in 2019! Saturday participants will receive a special commemorative gift. But, wait — there’s more! ‘Paleo’ Joe Kchodl will once again join us for a special science talk the evening before the dig. Paleo Joe will present The Fossil Adventures of PaleoJoe at on Friday, May 17 at 6:30 pm in the Gateway Building Auditorium, 3556 Lakeshore Road in Blasdell, NY. This family-friendly presentation is FREE for Penn Dixie members AND registered dig guests, or $5 for the public. No reservations needed. Tickets: Saturday, May 18: Members $35, non-members $40 Sunday, May 19: Members $20, non-members $25, under 18 $15 Weekend Pass: Members $45, non-members $55 – SAVE $10 Monday, May 20: Included for all guests. Director’s Notes: This program will sell out — please reserve early. In commemoration of our 15th dig, we offer Child (under age 18) tickets for Sunday’s dig at $15 each. Children are welcome to attend on Saturday at the regular rate. We do not recommend that children under age 7 attend this program due to the technical and safety requirements. During Dig With The Experts, other areas of Penn Dixie will be open to fossil collectors of all ages and regular tours will be available. Children must be accompanied at all times. Tickets are electronic and will not be mailed. International Guests: Please email Dr. Phil Stokes at phil@penndixie.org with your name, order info (i.e., dates, numbers, and types of tickets), and membership status. We’ll send you a PayPal invoice directly. Dig with the Experts draws collectors from around the globe for this unique opportunity, which was developed and is currently co-led by our friends from the Cincinnati Dry Dredgers. Bring a hammer, chisel, safety glasses, newspaper, and paper towels to wrap your fossils. Extra water is recommended, plus bring rain gear just in case the weather doesn’t cooperate. Food trucks will be on site Saturday and Sunday to serve lunch. Guests are welcome to bring their own food and beverages, as well as a small cart to transport personal items and specimens. Chairs and umbrellas are okay, too. We thank Zoladz Construction Co., Inc. for their help to get Penn Dixie ready for this big event. https://penndixie.org/dig-with-the-experts/
  21. My first 3D trilobite

    An unidentified species of Paralejurus, dated to the Emsian age of the Devonian. It's from Jebel Oufatene, Morocco. It's also my first 3D trilobite. Of course, I bought it, I don't have any skills in finding fossils and preparing them. They'll hopefully develop in the future though.
  22. Fossil IDs (if possible)

    I like collecting fossils, but I usually am not sure what my finds are. Please, could you help me identify these fossils? I noted down some possibilities down below. 1 - could be a late Albian ammonite from central Serbia, but I am not entirely sure. Acquired in Serbia. 2 - Found at Southerndown, Wales. Could it be a tree root or something in the region of that? It has a cross-hatched pattern if you look closely. 3 & 4 - A shell I found at Penarth, Wales but I am not entirely sure what it is called. 5 - A bone I found in the mud at Tites Point, Severn, Gloucestershire. maybe a birds? 6 - Some shells I found in mudstone at Charmouth, England. Was found in the same stone as 7. 7 - wood I found at Charmouth? It was very crumbly and delicate. 8 - A Trilobite fragment possibly, Llanfawr quarries, Wales. 9 - A bivalve I found in Southerndown. Not sure what it is though.
  23. Shrine of the Japanese trilobites

    Stocker, C., Williams, M., Oji, T., Tanaka, G., Komatsu, T. and Wallis, S., 2019. Spirits of Yokokurayama: shrine of the Japanese trilobites. Geology Today, 35(1), pp.15-19. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gto.12255 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/330640693_Spirits_of_Yokokurayama_shrine_of_the_Japanese_trilobites Yours, Paul H.
  24. Hello all! It's almost spring, and that means it's time for @Kane and me to alter the geography of New York state once again! Current plans are to start at Penn Dixie on April 26th, then off to the DSR area on Saturday. Sunday is a mystery still, but we're working on it. As always, anyone is welcome to come out and join in the destruction, er... fossil hunting. Last year was a heck of a thing, lots of good stuff was found, and I think everyone had a pretty good time. @Pagurus, @JamesAndTheFossilPeach , @Fossildude19 , @Malcolmt, @Jeffrey P (I'm sure there are more I'm forgetting off-hand.)
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