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Found 33 results

  1. Cadulus or Polyschides?

    This Scaphopod is from the Pliocene Yorktown Formation, Rushmere Member. Found in some matrix from the inside of a large Ecphora from the Tar River in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. One resource I have at home (NCFC volume 2, Fossil Molluscs) calls this Polyschides thallus while every online resource I can find online calls it Cadulus thallus. I cannot find any resource showing a change in Genus from Cadulus to Polyschides. Does anyone have a resource showing this? Which one is correct?
  2. Divalinga quadrisulcata

    A very uncommon find for this site, possibly due to it's small size. Found in matrix from the inside of a large clam shell. PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell 1993
  3. Chlamys decemnarius

    From the Pliocene Yorktown Formation Zone 2 Rushmere Member. An uncommon find at this particular site. Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, II MIOCENE AND PLIOCENE PECTINIDAE (BIVALVIA) FROM THE LEE CREEK MINE AND ADJACENT AREAS, by Thomas G. Gibson
  4. Pandora crassidens

    Complete double valves are rare at this site. Pieces of this shell are not uncommon. Found at the base of Zone 2, Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation on the Tar River. The two photos of the hinge detail were included to show that detail. They are not from the same specimen. PLIOCENE MOLLUSCS FROM THE YORKTOWN AND CHOWAN RIVER FORMATIONS IN VIRGINIA Lyle D. Campbell 1993
  5. Pliocene Yorktown Formation Bivalve

    I need some help. This bivalve came from a river here in eastern North Carolina. Pliocene Yorktown Formation, zone 2 Rushmere member. I believe it is in the Family Pteriidae (pearl oysters) Genus Crenatula. However I cannot find anything in any literature I have or can come up with. Complete specimens are extremely rare at this site, though pieces are not uncommon. Any thoughts? @MikeR @SailingAlongToo Complete specimen top ... bottom .. another one I found complete, but broke after it got home. So I opened it to picture the hinge details .... top ... bottom ...
  6. Would appreciate some help on this one. Found at the GMR creek in Greenville nc, has peedee , yorktown and some Pleistocene stuff too, found among mako and great white teeth along with some Cretaceous shark teeth. The texture inside is interesting almost like the mastadon slivers I’ve found at gmr but not quite... maybe part of whale tooth root? Any direction is greatly appreciated, even if it is just a plain oh piece of bone, haha!
  7. As part of our recent tour through the Carolinas, Tammy and I stopped for a bit at the Aurora Fossil Museum (Aurora, NC) to walk through the museum itself as well as to have fun playing in the "sandbox" across the street. The local phosphate mine dumps fine gravel from the mining process in a big pile (two, actually) across from the museum so visitors can hunt for fossils in the fossil-rich gravel without having to deal with the liability issues of coming to the open-pit phosphate mine itself. I'm not quite sure if the fossiliferous gravel represents the Pungo River Marl (Lower Miocene), the Yorktown (Early Pliocene), or a mixture of these and other formations at the mine so the stratigraphy is muddled and likely impossible to determine from this off-site location. We were in luck in that the gravel piles were "turned" that morning exposing fresh material at the surface. It had also rained persistently for several days so the piles were a bit of a sticky mess. I think this made it all the more fun for the young fossil hunters we met on the piles. I was only interested in collecting some of the finer material to look through back home for micro-fossils and so we made use of our sifting screens to remove the larger shark teeth helping the kids to increase their finds. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/87495-epic-carolinas-roadtrip/&do=findComment&comment=950166 I've been busy since returning from this trip but I did manage to wash the sticky silt from the Lee Creek micro-matrix we collected from the piles and dry and store it for later perusal. I had to try a sample of this to gauge the fossil density and get an idea of what was hiding in there as this was a novel micro-matrix source for me (though it has been offered several times on this forum). I've been quite impressed with the density and diversity of mostly tiny shark teeth and other items I'm used to seeing in marine-based micro-matrix. There are some novel species that I'm not used to seeing in micro-matrix from South Florida. In particular, these nice little shark teeth with the cool side cusps were a welcome surprise. They are roughly 3 mm across the root and about 4 mm high. As these popped out of the first small sample that I picked through, I'm guessing these are quite common and well known by the folks familiar with this material. I'm hoping @powelli1 or @sixgill pete or @Al Dente might be able to provide an ID from the image below. Even more interesting that the shark teeth was what appears to be a claw core that also appeared in this small sampling of the micro-matrix. I don't know my claw cores very well--unless it is an enormous ground sloth core from Florida (still high in my Florida fossil bucket list). I don't even know enough to know if this would be from a bird, reptile, or mammal but I'm sure this forum will come to my aid and offer some clues to what I've found. In particular, @Auspex should be able to quickly made an avian/non-avian determination. As a size reference, this item is about 8.5 mm in overall length and around 4 mm at its widest width. Looking forward to another bit of forum-based education tailored to the items that have recently encountered. Cheers. -Ken
  8. Morus peninsularis

    Proximal end of right ulna. Very well preserved with amazing quill knobs. Brodkorb, Pierce 1955. The Avifauna of the Bone Valley Formation. Florida Geological Survey Report of Investigations, 14: 57 pages, 8 tables, 11 plates. S M I T H S O N I A N C O N T R I B U T I O N S TO P A L E O B I O L O G Y • NUMBER 90 Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III Clayton E. Ray and David J. Bohaska,Editors Storrs L. Olson and Pamela C. Rasmussen, 2001 Miocene and Pliocene Birds from the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina
  9. I went river collecting one weekend in early April this year, the water dropped pretty darn low for this time of year allowing me to get to some spots that usually I can only access June through September. I found more echphora than I've ever come across in a single trip, a couple of them are HUGE and a few were near perfect/complete! Also found my first larger (2 of them!) Welch (or conc? still trying to ID it) from this site along with a great array of other items. My personal favorite from this trip was the echphora with a barnacle attached - I always love to find barnacles attached to bivalves and gastropods and this guy even had some worm tubes attached with it! . PM me if you want some higher quality images to zoom in on - I only had the four photo's and file limit size restricted what I could put that would allow you to really zoom in on each item clearly. Don't ask me WHERE I found these, I will tell you exactly what the title says, Eastern NC on a river.
  10. Did I pick up trash? Opalescent

    Found this washed up in a place I think is yorktown formation. I thought it might be fossilized because of the opalescence in the marrow. I dont know where to start on evaluating this, what do you all think?
  11. Mastodon Bones Found in SE Virginia Swamp

    Article from last Friday's Daily Press newspaper in southeast Virginia (Hampton Roads), about mastodon bones being found in a local swamp and being curated by the Virginia Living Museum. Interestingly, this discovery was made only 2 miles from where General George Washington and the Continental Army (aided by the French) politely requested Lord General Cornwallis to leave the American Colonies in 1781. http://www.dailypress.com/news/science/dp-nws-mastodon-bones-exhibit-20180123-story.html Cheers, SA2
  12. Found this over the holidays at a fossil site in Coastal VA that for me at least has never before this same trip coughed up any vertebrae material, that being a fish vert. The primary finds at this site are scallops, barnacles and some of the more common smaller mollusks common within the Miocene coastal / tidal finds.... this is a Yorktown formation locality... so, the question is, is the coiled material a fish coprolite or a tube worm? I’ve certainly never found any similar tube worms in my life so I’m hopeful it’s a coprolite but looking for some input from anyone w more definitive thoughts... happy New Years and thanks In Advance.
  13. Turritella alticostata

    A nice Turritella. Not uncommon at this site, but rarely in such good shape.
  14. Dentalium attenuatum

    A nice Dentalium from a site where they are very common. Most a in very poor shape or crumble when touched.
  15. Bostrycapulus aculeata ponderosa

    A nice slipper shell. Not a common find, especially in good shape. Forum Member MikeR has made the following notes on this sub-species in his gallery." Cambell, in his 1994 paper listed all spiny slipper shells as one of two sub species of B. aculeata. The subspecies ponderosa is inflated and can be variable in the amount of spines as stacked individuals will remove the spines of the one below them. Being the lifestyle is different from the extant B. aculeata, sub species ponderosa could be a different species." I agree with Mike's assessment of this, this should possibly be considered it's own species.
  16. Diodora redimicula

    A very nice limpet shell. These are very fragile and are most often found broken.
  17. Lucinoma contracta

    An uncommon find for this site, to be double valved and in good condition. This specimen has the added feature of a bore hole from a boring clam most likely.
  18. Mercenaria corrugata

    Collected from the Rushmere Member of the Pliocene Yorktown Formation. Most of these, along with many of the other "clam" type bivalves are extremely crumbly and often fall apart when picked up. This specimen was dug out of the layer and is a great example of the species.
  19. Glossus fraternus

    Collected from the Rushmere Member of the Pliocene Yorktown Formation. Most of these, along with many of the other "clam" type bivalves are extremely crumbly and often fall apart when picked up. This specimen was dug out of the layer and is a great example of the species.
  20. Eucrassatella virginica

    This clam is a common find in the Yorktown Formation bluff banks of the Tar River. It is often found in association with Echphora's. Many of these clams are "double valvers" but often break upon handling.
  21. Ostrea compressirostra

    Self collected from a bluff along the Tar River upstream of Tarboro N.C. This is a fairly common oyster in this deposit, but most are extremely brittle and crumble upon touching. Still looking for my first complete (double valve) specimen.
  22. Chesapecten

    A small specimen of this species, but a nice one. They get quite a bit larger. I have one pushing 160 mm wide but it is in poor shape.
  23. Ecphora

    A very nice Ecphora. Rarely found whole, this is probably my best specimen.
  24. Weekend find, date may have been 18th not the 19th, working to verify with dig partner. Found: Greens Mill Run, Greenville NC among a huge array of items (whale bone including several tempanic bulla, shark teeth (great white, tiger,crow, Giant White Shark etc) and two Enchodus teeth etc. Partner I was digging with found it (we were digging same location/hole together) in his screen and let me keep it. Boesse Confirmed an ID on ID Forum "Nice specimen! This is almost certainly Balaenula sp., a dwarf right whale known from the Yorktown Fm. at Lee Creek. It's a miniature version of Eubalaena in that image at the top (which is from my blog)."
  25. Another weekend find, looks like a broken Vertebre - it's got a different shape to it, seems more oblong than round based on the shape of the half I have. Rick noted looks sort of like a Plesiosaur vert? If anyone can ID it from what fragment we have, that would be AWESOME and much appreciated! Let me know if you need more photos. Found: Greensmill Run, Greenville, NC. In a hole with an array/time span of things from cretaceous to native american artifacts (enchodus teeth, crow shark, shale bone, great white, giant white, modern tiger shark teeth and pottery.
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