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Found 73 results

  1. Paleozoic corals of Jerada,Morocco

    Palaontol Z (2010) 84:323–344 Rugose corals from the upper Visean (Carboniferous)of the Jerada Massif (NE Morocco): taxonomy, biostratigraphy,facies and palaeobiogeography Markus Aretz @Tidgy's Dad @TqB pdfb.pdf
  2. What kind of jaw is this?

    Can anyone tell me what this is? All I know is it’s from Kem Kem. My best guess is some type of crocodile. What else even has all those nerve channels besides crocs and the spinosaur family? I think the shape(top&bottom view) looks similar to pancake croc jaws, and I’m pretty sure there were a number of others with that type of jaw, but I don’t know when and where they were, sooooo.......does anyone have any thoughts about it?
  3. The jurassic of Morocco: dinosauria

    A basal sauropod dinosaur from the Early Jurassic of Morocco Ronan Allain , Najat Aquesbi , Jean Dejax , Christian Meyer ,Michel Monbaron , Christian Montenat , Philippe Richir , Mohammed Rochdy , Dale Russell , Philippe Taquet Comptes Rendues Palevol,v.3/2004 Tazoudasaurus naiimi specific epithet: naimi*,arabic for" small" *diacritics omitted allaidinosaufranceuropbaselireviepalevolCR8303000022-main.pdf
  4. No volcanic winter in East Africa from ancient Toba eruption. The supereruption 74,000 years ago did not trigger major environmental disruption that caused human populations in East Africa to decline, say geoscientists. University of Arizona, February 6, 2018 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180206151850.htm https://uanews.arizona.edu/story/no-volcanic-winter-east-africa-ancient-toba-eruption The paper is: Chad L. Yost, Lily J. Jackson, Jeffery R. Stone, Andrew S. Cohen. Subdecadal phytolith and charcoal records from Lake Malawi, East Africa imply minimal effects on human evolution from the ∼74 ka Toba supereruption. Journal of Human Evolution, 2018; 116: 75 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2017.11.005 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/323019180_Subdecadal_phytolith_and_charcoal_records_from_Lake_Malawi_East_Africa_imply_minimal_effects_on_human_evolution_from_the_74_ka_Toba_supereruption https://www.geo.arizona.edu/sites/www.geo.arizona.edu/files/135 Yost et al 2018 Toba Malawi Jour Human Evol.pdf https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0047248417302750?via%3Dihub Also, there is: Modern humans flourished through ancient supervolcano eruption 74,000 years ago. University of Cape Town, March 12, 2018 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/03/180312132956.htm https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-43377960 The paper is: Eugene I. Smith, Zenobia Jacobs, Racheal Johnsen, Minghua Ren, Erich C. Fisher, Simen Oestmo, Jayne Wilkins, Jacob A. Harris, Panagiotis Karkanas, Shelby Fitch, Amber Ciravolo, Deborah Keenan, Naomi Cleghorn, Christine S. Lane, Thalassa Matthews, Curtis W. Marean. Humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba eruption about 74,000 years ago. Nature, 2018; DOI: 10.1038/nature25967 https://digitalscholarship.unlv.edu/geo_fac_articles/145/ https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25967 Yours, Paul H.
  5. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 5

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  6. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 4

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  7. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 3

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  8. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 2

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  9. Moroccan Shark teeth ID 1

    Hi who can help me tell me what types of shark teeth they are?
  10. 'Ghost' population of humans discovered in ancient Africa By Laura Geggel, Live Science, January 22, 2020 https://www.livescience.com/ancient-dna-sub-saharan-africa.html DNA from child burials reveals ‘profoundly different’ human landscape in ancient Africa By Ann Gibbons, science News, January 22, 2020 https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/01/dna-child-burials-reveals-profoundly-different-human-landscape-ancient-africa Lipson, M., Ribot, I., Mallick, S., Rohland, N., Olalde, I., Adamski, N., Broomandkhoshbacht, N., Lawson, A.M., López, S., Oppenheimer, J. and Stewardson, K., 2020. Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history. Nature, pp.1-6. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-1929-1 Yours, Paul H.
  11. as a connoisseur of Pterosaurs, I wanted to ask the Community here to show me it's pterosaur fossils from the Kem Kem Formation. After seeing a rare Tapejarid Premaxilla recently get sold on a Fossil Dealing site (labeled incorrectly as Alanqa), I wondered what treasures could be present in Private Collections in this Community. Teeth are just as welcome as Bones are.
  12. Bone Identification - Botswana Skull

    Hi everyone, Can you help me identify what animal this may be? It was found in Botswana. It is a semi-arid climate. Any idea if it's carnivorous or not? Any clues are helpful! Thanks.
  13. Pterosaur Fossils are a rarity, and few ever are on the public market, but the Pterosaurs from the Kem Kem Beds are seen most commonly on the market, this is rather not due to an unusally high Pterosaur abundance, but rather because almost every Fossil is being collected at this locality. Currently, there are 4 named species from the Kem Kem Beds, but the actual number is far higher. The Named Taxa are Alanqa saharica, Xericeps curvirostris, Sirrocopteryx morrocanus and Coloborhynchus fluviferox. Some unnamed ones im allowed to talk about are the Kem Kem Tapejarid, a small Chaoyangopterid species and a 3rd Ornithocheirid. The small Chaoyangopterid originally was identified as a Pteranodontid, but it is a Chaoyangopterid. There are up to 4 more Pterosaurs from this Locality, but I am not allowed to talk about them, all of them Azhdarchoids though. The 3rd Ornithocheirid wont affect the identification of any of the Ornithocheirid teeth, but that's all I can say. Sirrocopteryx and Coloborhynchus The Identification of Pterosaur Teeth from Kem Kem has recently become impossible to the genus level, for the most part that. C. fluviferox is a gigantic Ornithocheirid, and any Teeth of greater size might be referable to it, cf. Coloborhynchus fluviferox. Another thing notable is that the Identification can be restricted to a subfamily, Coloborhynchinae indet. instead of Ornithocheiridae/Anhangueridae indet., although this is rather Nitpicky. Alanqa and Xericeps Both of these Taxa are primarily known from Mandible and Rostral Tips, identification of these is rather easy, with the one of Alanqa being triangular in crossection, and the ones of Xericeps curving upward. Loads of Postcrania is also often refered the either of the two, referal is inconclusive though, especially considering there are more than just those two. The Chaoyangopterid and Tapejarid I have never seen either two on sale, but I will be mentioning them further too. The Tapejarid is a large Taxon related to Sinopterus, it's the first image. But there is more Material I cant mention. The small Chaoyangopterid is just a mandible fragment, but it has a rather deep crest. What about the Dsungaripterid? The Material of the Dsungaripterid most likely represents Xericeps.
  14. Hi, All. The best I can do with this is simply put up the pictures and let wiser minds than mine (ie: everybody else!) take a look. I don't know what this is; it has tooth-like qualities, but I just can't get a handle on it. It would have come from the Agadez area of Niger, for what that's worth. Thanks for looking!
  15. Spinosaurus and sigilmassasaurus

    Hello so could someone please explain the situation with sigilmassasaurus and spinosaurus was it the same dinosaur? was sigilmassasaurus bigger? Thanks
  16. Spinosaurus actual form

    So after following nizaar ibrahim's study in 2014 I learned that spinosaurus walked on four legs and it spend a lot of time in water being a good swimmer. But recently I saw that some new studies have been published and then some others and I have lost track so if someone could please inform me about the latest discoveries and tell me if spinosaurus was a good swimmer and if he walked on four it would be much appreciated.
  17. miscellaneous Moroccan mollusca

    2018_KlugPohle_Amessoui_ISCPP_fieldGuide.pdf The eastern Amessoui Syncline – a hotspot for Silurian to Carboniferous cephalopod research CHRISTIAN KLUG & ALEXANDER POHLE Münster. Forsch.Geol. Paläont. 110 244-260 17 Figs. Münster,March 2018 an excursion guide(More or less),and a nicely illustrated one recommended! (Some ichnites figured as well,amongst which a probable non-trilobitogenic Rusophycus)
  18. DKNC-001 Carcharocles auriculatus (Togo)

    From the album Elasmobranchs

    TFF DKNC-001 Tooth height is 2-3/8 inches (≈6 cm)

    © David Kn.

  19. could this be a bone?

    Hi, All. I came across this yesterday, but couldn't make heads nor tails of it.... I want to think it's not a bone - one side is very smooth, while the other has a tone of small stones attached to it - but the view of the inside has me wondering.... Thanks for looking at it, and telling me what I'm looking at. I seem to have a really long learning curve! Rob @LordTrilobite @Bone guy @Haravex @Troodon
  20. Extinct species of bird came back from the dead, scientists find

    Wiped out 135000 years ago... That is some feat of magic.!!! @Auspex Any one have fossils of this bird? https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/10/africa/white-throated-rail-extinction-scli-intl-scn/index.html
  21. Hi, All. Okay - I'm trying to learn here, so please bear with me! I've been told that many of the teeth I've acquired here in Niger have been croc teeth, and that one of the ways to tell a croc tooth is by a circular base (basil?), while spinosauridae teeth are more oval.... That said, I offer the following two teeth for your informed evaluation! The bigger one is relatively narrow (the side shot with the enamel curving over the top gives you an idea), with the smaller one has a distinct "ridge" on each front/back (I know those aren't the technical terms - sorry!). As always, I greatly appreciate the education that you folks are giving me - thank you! Rob @Troodon @Haravex @jpc @LordTrilobite
  22. paleoichthyology:the piscine epidermis

    offthescale Histology of ganoid scales from the early Late Cretaceous of the Kem Kem beds, SE Morocco: systematic and evolutionary implications François J. Meunier, René-Paul Eustache , Didier Dutheil & Lionel Cavin Cybium,2016/40(2) "Lepidotes" pankowskii is renamed Note: fig 1 is the only figure dedicated to the macroscopic(naked eye) aspect of the scales. The "histology" in the tags is a dead giveaway where the emphasis lies..
  23. get your teeth into this,part three

    fish Marc Michaut:Neoselachii du Maastrichtian au sud du Niger HAL Id: hal-01729203 https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01729203 Submitted on 12 Mar 2018 RECOMMENDED NOTA BENE: IN FRENCH
  24. Hi, All. Here's another "large" fossil I've acquired. Same origin as the others - Agadez area of the Sahara desert in Niger. Based on the feedback I got on an earlier submission, I'm wondering if this could be from a sauropod and, if so, what part of the skeleton? As you can see, there's a lot of mud on it that I haven't tried to remove yet, as I am a complete neophyte and don't know the proper way to do so. I welcome any and all guidance on that too. Thanks so much for all your replies! Rob @Haravex @LordTrilobite @jpc @Troodon @-Andy-
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