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Found 11 results

  1. The Day of The Echinoderm

    Firstly, a big THANK YOU to @Jeffrey P for hanging out with me for the day! What a knowledgeable, generous, and all around swell guy! If you ever get the opportunity to hunt with Jeff, I highly encourage you to. Jeff and I met at around 8:30 am, and after a quick transfer of his gear to my truck, we were off. We first drove about 45 minutes south to the small town of Wax, to hunt the Upper Mississippian. Specifically to look for blastoids and crinoid calyxes that were known to be found in the area. As it happens, luck was with us! Unfortunately, I didn't take the field pictures that I typically do. Due to the fact that I went swimming with my phone a month or so ago . I am down to using my wife's old phone that I found in the junk drawer (Yes Jeff, it's pink... ). I didn't take it out much to avoid the inevitable drop down the hill side. Especially since it doesn't even have a protective case... Jeff snapped a few pictures. Maybe he will chime in and add them when he is able. For the first few minutes we didn't find much besides crinoid stems, bryozoans, and the deflated or crushed brachiopods common to the site. The main species of brach found in the area doesn't seem to have fared well during the fossilization process. Finding a nice inflated one is a rarity. After a few minutes of adjusting our eyes to spot the small finds located here, we started to pick out the blastoids. Jeff was the first to find one, and gifted it to me as he had already collected a few on his previous trips here. Thanks Jeff for gifting me my first blastoid! Most of the blastoids, while small, were whole and nicely preserved. Here are a few examples. I did happen to find the largest blastoid from the site, and one of the larger ones Jeff had seen from here. Super pumped about this one! Crinoid calyx were also to be found here. We only found a few, but being that these were also a first for me, I was extremely excited to find them! The brachiopods I previously mentioned were abundant, and besides crinoid stems, were the most abundant fossil to be found here. Again, they are almost always deflated. Finding a nice inflated one would be a real treat. These other little Spirifer(?) brachiopods could also be found. Although they were more uncommon that the previous ones. They are very small and delicate. Often crumbling when trying to pick them up. Bivalves could be found here also, but were extremely rare. Jeff was excited to find a couple, but I struck out. Other things that could be found were crinoid stems, the odd solitary rugose coral, and of course the ever present bryozoans. We then headed to a site a few miles down the road in Leitchfield. Stay tuned!
  2. Archimedes sp. (Owen 1838)

    From the album Bryozoa

    5cm. long Bangor Limestone Formation Mississippian Early Carboniferous From Northern Alabama
  3. Big Hill (KY) geology and fossil expedition 11-2-2019 video link Kentucky Academy of Science Saturday afternoon activity: Quartz infilling identified by Dr. Frank Ettensohn, expedition host Stylolites identified by Dr. Frank Ettensohn Archimedes bryozoan identified by Mr. Daniel J. Phelps Mr. Phelps describes crinoid, brachiopod (Composita) and modern isopods=pill bugs or rolly pollies Crinoid stem columnals described by Darrell Barnes in rock detritus collection site (Mark Montgomery interacts) Dr. Frank Ettensohn identifies the spine of a crinoid by Darrell Barnes
  4. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bryzoan - Archimedes screw wrapped in Fronds Chesterian Zone of the Bangor Limestone Formation in northern Alabama Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified skeleton of a delicate spiral-shaped mesh that was thickened near the axis into a massive corkscrew-shaped central structure. The most common remains are fragments of the mesh that are detached from the central structure, and these may not be identified other than by association with the "corkscrews", that are fairly common. Specimens in which the mesh remains attached to the central structure are rare. Like other bryozoans, Archimedes forms colonies, and like other fenestrates, the individuals (or zooids) lived on one side of the mesh, and can be recognized for the two rows of equally distanced rimmed pores. Inside the branches, neighbouring individuals were in contact through small canals. Bryozoans are stationary epifaunal suspension feeders. The majority of fossils of this genus are distributed throughout Europe and North America, but they have also been found in sediments of Afghanistan, Canada, Russia, and Australia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryozoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: †Fenestrida Family: †Fenestellidae Genus: †Archimedes
  5. Bryzoan, Large Archimedes.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Large Archimedes Bryzoan in matrix Bangor Limestone Formation, North Alabama, USA Mississippian Period c 325,000,000 years ago Archimedes is a genus of bryozoans belonging to the family Fenestellidae. The first use of the term "Archimedes" in relation to this genus was in 1838. This genus of bryozoans is named Archimedes because of its corkscrew shape, in analogy to the Archimedes' screw, a type of water pump which inspired modern ship propellers. These forms are pretty common as fossils but they have been extinct since the Permian. Archimedes is a genus of fenestrate bryozoans with a calcified skeleton of a delicate spiral-shaped mesh that was thickened near the axis into a massive corkscrew-shaped central structure. The most common remains are fragments of the mesh that are detached from the central structure, and these may not be identified other than by association with the "corkscrews", that are fairly common. Specimens in which the mesh remains attached to the central structure are rare. Like other bryozoans, Archimedes forms colonies, and like other fenestrates, the individuals (or zooids) lived on one side of the mesh, and can be recognized for the two rows of equally distanced rimmed pores. Inside the branches, neighbouring individuals were in contact through small canals. Bryozoans are stationary epifaunal suspension feeders. The majority of fossils of this genus are distributed throughout Europe and North America, but they have also been found in sediments of Afghanistan, Canada, Russia, and Australia. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Bryozoa Class: Stenolaemata Order: †Fenestrida Family: †Fenestellidae Genus: †Archimedes
  6. Ever since I was youngster I've been fascinated with paleontology. I always thought thought the act of going out and hunting for fossils was far fetched... That I would spend hours and hours of searching and come back with nothing. Recently however I did some research on the topic and discovered that oceanic fossils are actually quit abundant and easy to find. After stumbling upon this new information I quickly purchased a rock pick and cold tempered chisel and gathered all the equipment I would need for my first fossil hunt - something I'd dreamed of for as long as I can remember. Last week my father and I set out to explore an area near Fenton which I heard was filled with loads of fossils and I must say that it was the most fun I've had in a long time. While my goal of finding a trilobite was a bust we found a lot of other cool stuff in an area of exposed rock along the Merremac river. Among the things were found were plenty of crinoids, brachiopods, horn coral, and bryozoa, a well preserved Archimedes screw, and, my personal favorite, a perfectly preserved gastropod (snail shell) about 1 inch in diameter. I also chiseled out a perfect spherical concretion which, as I understand, is essentially a fossilized meteor. There are also some rounder shaped things... I have no clue what they are. If anyone has any tips on how to clean up these fossils to make them look more presentable than they already are, please share (for I am clueless on how to do such things). Also if anyone has some recommendations on great place to hunt in the St. Louis area I'd like to hear them. I hear the Fern Glenn site is pretty good so I might try that next. On a side note... This fossil hunting... It's like an addiction... Now that I've had my first hunt I need more! I'm craving more fossil hunts! If I don't go another one soon I think I'm going to go crazy! -Jake
  7. I'd heard this location had blastoids, which I've never seen before, so last Friday me and a friend headed down there. We arrived around 930 or so and were immediately stuck by the steepness of the cut "we have to go up this?". We got up near the top where the really productive layer is and immediately started finding blastoids, archimedes, and small horn corals. Most blastoids were in the 1/2" range, I found one archimedes that is around 6" in a slab. Buddy found one blastoid that is probably over 1". The horn corals are generally small. Lots of crinoid bits and pieces also. We took a break for lunch and when we returned we had company. On the west side there was now a man and his son. We hit the east side but it wasn't very productive. Dropped back down and the man & son were gone, but now there was an older lady with 3 young boys. We crossed over and said hi. They were looking for fossils on the very bottom layer, which is hard limestone and not very productive. The boys got very excited when they saw my rock pick and boots. I gave them some of the duplicates of everything I had picked up earlier. I told them the good stuff was up there. Things evolved and me and my buddy wound up taking the two older boys up the road cut to hunt. The boys were very polite, calling us "sir" the whole time. We spent around 30 minutes up high, with them finding several examples on their own. I ended up giving them my bottle of water because they were dried out. I was identifying what they were finding or debunking psuedofossils (lots of those when you're 10/13) the whole time. They eventually asked me if I was a scientist. Eventually grandma yelled up that it was time to go, so we had to get down. I think all the grown-ups were much more concerned about it than the kids. The 13 year old scrabbled down 3 steep 4' shelves in no time. But I slowed down the 10 yeard old, I was afraid he was going to fall. I ended up getting below him and lifting him down each shelf. He actually told me I was really nice. Overall a fun trip, if a bit short. It was made more enjoyable by getting to help stir an interest in science in some youngsters.
  8. Big Rains = Big Bryozoans

    What a interesting start to May, 45 and rainy in Alabama!!! In fact rainy is an understatement, it rained hard for about 12 hours straight. Decided I was going stir crazy in the house and would risk being wet and cold and went out fossil hunting. It was well worth it, found lots of great things but--I feel strange saying this--bryozoans ruled the day (Archimedes specifically). For those that have hunted these interesting things, you know that these things are usually not very long unless in matrix. To be honest these were no longer intact either, but they were exposed in the shale from the heavy rain overnight and had yet to scatter. Here they are...
  9. Archimedes Bryozoan

    From the Fort Payne Chert (Mississippian) of northern Alabama, here's what I think to be an Archimedes bryozoan in cross section. Scale is in centimeters. Am I correct? Can you suggest a more specific identification? I was unfortunately unable to collect this one, as it was in a fairly large rock, but I know where to find it next time. Thanks in advance for your consideration. EDIT: I was wrong, this is from the Monteagle Limestone (also Mississippian).
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