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Found 21 results

  1. Small Jaw

    I found this little specimen that I assume is a jaw section a while back when sieving through some matrix. The material that it came from is marine from the toolebuc formation in central Queensland Australia this is cretaceous albian in age. Any input I would be grateful for. The specimen is 4mm on the long so quite small Regards Mike
  2. opal fossil, what is it?

    Hello All, I was hoping that someone could help me identify this bone? its from the mid-Cretaceous Griman Creek Formation of Lightning Ridge Australia I don't think its a yabby button or turtle shell, as the piece is not rounded like a yabby button and there is bone texture. the piece is bilaterally symmetrical and there appear to have joins or groves where the bone meets. The underside is not flat like I would expect for turtle shell... Looking forward to your replies Rod
  3. Vertebra Queensland

    Looking through my usual matrix I came across this partial vertebra that has me stumped. Both sections were sitting together in the matrix so assume they are part of the same vertebra. Definitely not fish so some type of reptile ? Hopping the process end is diagnostic enough to determine species. Second piece in post below Mike
  4. Everyone kind of guessed this was true. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2018/01/18/buckingham-palace-riddled-ancient-fossils-scientists-confirm/
  5. What the ?

    So tempted with the tile as I have found this little Y shaped oddity. As per the tags this was found in the matrix I collect from the Toolebuc formation from Richmond Queensland Australia and this is cretaceous, albian in age and about 100 million years old. The specimen is 8 mm long and 1 mm thick and broken at all ends so not big or complete. Thanks in advance for all input. Mike D'Arcy
  6. Unknown cretaceous tooth

    While sieving through some matrix I came across this unusual tooth The tooth is from the cretaceous, albian, marine matrix from the toolebuc formation in central Queensland Australia. at 10 mm long it is not very big but there are striations on both flat sides, making it unusual compared to the normal fish teeth that are abundant. The edge on one side appears to be slightly rounded and the other that is chipped is quite acute. Thankful for any leads Mike D'Arcy
  7. Cretaceous Shark australia

    Hi all I picked up this broken specimen out at Julia Creek (Western Queensland Australia) a short while back and assume it is a small shark Vertebra but would like conformation as it is worn. The formation is cretaceous around 100 million in age - I still have to confirm the formation as I have never fossicked in the spot before as it was a short stop for lunch on a full day drive. The specimen if whole would have been about 22 mm in diameter so is small. There appears to be quite a few growth rings so this may have been a quite small mature shark ? (Bramble) Mike D,Arcy
  8. Book on ebay

    Browsing through Ebay Australia in the book section I noticed a copy of "Vertebrate palaeontology of Australia" by P. Vickers-Rich for sale at a reasonable cost (a lot cheaper than what I paid fro my copy). This book is a good overall reference book on Australian fossils and would recommend it for all Australian collectors. Mike D'Arcy
  9. Imprint of opalised fossil vertebrae?

    Dear paleo experts, I wonder if you could help me out here. Please excuse my naivety if I have totally gotten this wrong... but I am wondering if this slab of opal (Lightning Ridge, Australia) in my collection might actually bear the imprint of some fossilised material? It was the very informative blog of Andre Stucki (opalised fossil specimens) and Johno's Opals that brought me here to seek your advice. Thank you for any information you might be able to provide. And if I am totally wrong about this; my sincere apologies for wasting your time.
  10. Macropus jaw. What species?

    I have this fossil Macropus jaw on hold. It will be sent next week. I think it's very cool but I'm not sure of the ID. The seller has it listed as Macropus rufogresius (I think he means rufogriseus, Red Necked Wallaby). However, I don't think that's what it is. The incisor looks much bigger and bladed. Any ideas?
  11. Jimbacrinus stems

    From the album Australian crinoids

    A few Jimbacrinus (Permian crinoid) stems from Western Australia.
  12. Australian Trilobite ID

    Hey guys I got a partial Australian trilobite and I was wondering the species. Don't know the locality yet. It's from NSW, that's all I know
  13. Bird Or Pterosaur

    I processed some matrix today and found this small claw so I am interested to see what others think it is. The claw was found in the marine matrix from the Toolebuc formation that is a marine deposit that dates to the albian period in the cretaceous, about 100 million years ago of Australia it is found around Richmond in central Queensland. The scale in the photos is in half millimetres. the tip of the claw is broken of and what remains is about 5.5 mm long and about 1.2 mm wide. As the specimen is a claw I have eliminated the usual suspects of fish and marine reptiles so I am leaning more to the fly in type of suspect with bird and pterosaur the main contenders. I assume that due to the narrow width of this specimen the claws function is more to slice rather than to grip or scratch. Thanks in advance for looking and I hope some feed back. Comparative photos would be nice especially those of a better quality than I take. Mike D'Arcy
  14. Unsure If Turtle

    This was found in the matrix I have been breaking down and looking through. The fossil is from the toolebuc formation from central queensland Australia and is cretaceous albian in age. I just cleaned this fossil up last week from the matrix but had noticed there was something about a month ago when breaking down some larger pieces and had left it to the side. When I found it in two halves I wasn't sure if it was a coprolite or fossil so glued the two halves back and cleaned it up. I suspect it is a turtle vertebra from under the carapace but have been unable to find an example of the vertebra showing the hollow along the top edge. If turtle it is either Bouliachelys or notochelone. For scale the length is 30mm Thanks in advance Mike D
  15. As I am off work getting over a minor operation I finally made the time to start looking through some of the material I have kept when breaking down matrix and sieving. The pieces all went through the insect screen sieve and were found using a 5mp digital camera attached to the computer by scanning a small sample each time. The scale on the photographs is in half millimetres. Most I assume are either fish or shark. Mike D
  16. Another Cretaceous Shark Tooth

    Here is another shark tooth that I have no clue about. Found in Australian, Albian cretaceous deposit in the toolebuc formation near Richmond Queensland. tooth is just under 7 mm long thanks in advance for any input Mike D
  17. Cretaceous Shark Tooth

    I have finally started to sort through some of my small shark teeth and this one is a little different. As best as I can guess this is a johnlongia sp tooth. the photo with scale is in half millimetres so specimen is about 6 mm long. Thanks in advance. Mike D
  18. Shark Tooth

    I found this tooth in the matrix I was cleaning up this morning but not being an expert on shark teeth I am unable to identify this one the closest match I can find is cretolamna appendiculata from the books I have but this appears to have the start of an extra cusp on one side of the tooth. The name comes from an article by N Kemp on Fossil Chondrichthyans The specimen is from the toolebuc formation ( cretaceous albian )from Richmond western Queensland Australia and is 100 million years old give or take. Thank in advance Mike
  19. Opal Fossil

    A while back when looking through some matrix I noticed a flash of colour coming from the side of one of the small pieces. As I have now recently purchased a 5 mp digital microscope for my computer I can now better show the specimen. The fossil appears to be fish vertebra and was found in the Toolebuc formation in the quarry just outside Richmond Queensland Australia. this formation is marine hence the fish and is contemporary in age to the opal fossils found at lighting ridge. The nearest opal field is about 300 kilometres south at Opalton hence opal fossils are not known to be found in the quarry. This as far as I know is the only one, but shows that there may be more. As for scale the longest side of the piece of matrix is 12 mm long. enjoy Mike D
  20. Most Likely Avian

    Started sieving through some more material and am hopeful that I have lucked on another identifiable bird fossil. This comes from the same place that I found a partial bird humorous and the material looks to be identical in structure. I will apologise for the photo quality but a usb computer magnifier is the best I have for fossils this size. The fossil is from the Toolebuc formation and is Albian Cretaceous making it about 100 million years old give or take. Mike avain 6.bmp avian 1.bmp
  21. collected

    From the album my collection 2013

    All of these I have collected from near where I live. Mostly a few types of Echinoids, but also brachiopods, gastropods, corals and oysters.
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