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Found 11 results

  1. Bison/Bos tooth?

    Found this tooth while ago.Still not sure to which animal this belongs to.I know that it could be one od these two : Bison or Cow.I Found it last year in a Stream in the middle of the forest when i was looking for Oysters (Gryphea gingensis) in Paraćin,Serbia.People do not live near that forest but maybe they lived in some past.
  2. My Texas Bison Bonanza

    Last June 2018 I stumbled upon the skeleton of a bovid in a creek that was quite old considering it was down 5 feet or so in a bank. I thought it was a cow. I collected the bones that had fallen and a couple that easily came out without any real digging. I brought them home and washed them up and most have been sitting out on my patio under a bit of cover. Last Wednesday night I went to the monthly Dallas Paleontological Society meeting. While there I bought a book on cow and bison fossils. This past Saturday I had a busy morning and afternoon and got home a little after 3:00. I sat down to read the book. It named 3 notable differences between cow and bison bones. I was reading in suspense. I wanted to know if it was cow or bison. Of course I wanted it to be bison, but assumed it was cow. I got to page 10 and the one distinguishing bone I had was a metatarsal. I went and got it and I suddenly realized it was a bison bone!!! ! I had a sudden rush of excitement. My adrenaline was flowing as I flew around the house to change clothes and gather stuff I may need. I did not know what I’d find. For all I knew everything had washed away already. It had been over 7 months. We’ve had lots and lots of rain and numerous flooding events since last June. So I was skeptical. The place is about 40 min from my house. By the time I got everything ready and got there it was almost 4:30. It is about a 10 min walk from where I park my car. I’d never been to the creek in wet season so for all I knew it would be under water. I put on my hip wanders just in case. I got my pack and my garden hoe/claw digging tool. I headed out to the spot. The area above the creek is a flood plane. There was lots of standing water everywhere. When I got into the woods there were 2 nice 8-10 person tents there which appeared to have been vacated rapidly. They were in the flood plane and looked liked they had actually been flooded. No one had returned to take them down. There were hog tracks all over the place and the odor of hog excrement in the air. The forest floor was very mucky. I meandered through the trees and fallen limbs. The forest was fairly wide open with very little underbrush. I came to a point where I had to turn right to be able to find a point of access to the creek. The banks are 10 to 20 feet or more high depending upon where you’re at in the creek. The bank edge is a straight drop down into the creek so you can’t enter just anywhere. I came to a spot where there was a 3 foot drop with a tangle of roots where I could get down to a lower level and then into the creek. Then there was a hill so I sat down to scoot over the edge and then walked carefully down the hill. From there it was a short distance to the creek. Then I turned to walk down steam. I came around the bend in the creek and saw this. If you look closely you can see a large whitish object. That is the bison skull. To the left were thoracic vertebra and to the right were cervical vertebrae. Go figure that one out. Then there were some ribs and the edge of other bones and then another 5 feet down on the right was a femur. It was pretty chilly. In the low 40s with a stiff wind. Although down in the creek I was protected from the wind. I put down my pack and took out my gloves and a chisel to probe the dirt with and pull some of it away. The base of both horns were present, but no sign of the whole horns. A tip of a horn was broken off and sitting in the cavity of the other horn on the right. Otherwise both horns were gone. I carefully lifted the horn tip out and set it aside. Here is the skull with the horn tip on the right. These are thoracic vertebra. There are 6 visible behind the roots. These are cervical vertebra. I think 5 or 6 of them exposed. I uncovered part of the skull to its condition. There were a couple tree roots growing through it and the skull was split in two front to back about where the upper sinus cavities were. There were cracks all over the back and side of the skull. The atlas vertebra was in place with a bone that looked a bit like a broken rib sticking out of it. I didn’t know what was going on there. It seemed fixed in place as if it belonged there. After seeing all the cracks I decided to go back to my car and get the bottle of cyanoacrylate, my head lamp and something to drink. I grabbed a couple plastic bags and a small plastic box. I hurried back to begin the task of excavating the vertebrae and begin pedestaling the skull. I was in for a lot of work and sunset was only 30 minutes away. But I was really hyped about the whole thing. It was more fun and play than work in my eyes. I’ll post more of the story and pics tomorrow.
  3. ice aged tooth?

    Today I wanted to participate in the fossil of the month, but I read that I must have found the fossil itself - too bad - so I present it to you here: my coworker made with his daughter during the summer holidays on the Baltic coast in southern Denmark and found this wonderful tooth - 4,5 * 3,0 * 1,20 cm. Unfortunately, I do not know what it is, I suspect that it is a glacial Bison tooth - possibly from another herbivore. Knowing that I treasure and collect fossils, he left the piece to me. I would be very happy about a more precise ID. I appreciate your comments - Thank you, Christain
  4. Bos or red deer part of antler

    Hello to all! I was lucky today to find this! It's some type of horn but I'm not sure from which animal is.It is archeological find.I found many Bos taurus primigenius and Cervus elaphus bones so I'm thinking that this may belong to them.If u know better let me know Hvala!
  5. Fossil or not?

    Hi! I'm confused a bit? Is this fossil or not? It's little heavy than normal tooth,btw I try the burning test on some edges and it burns but doesn't smell like a burning bone and on some it doesn't burn at all..As u see the part underneath looks mineralized and it doesn't burn.If u can help some how,maybe some other test?
  6. Horse or a Bos tooth?

    Pozdrav! Found this today after a heavy rain in my garden,not sure if this is a bos or a horse tooth.I try with burning test and it really is a fossil .
  7. Quaternary Teeth

    Hi all, A few months ago I was fossil hunting by the Republican River in NE Kansas when I found part of an upper jaw washed up on a sandbar. From it I got 3 teeth, and I am trying to determine weather they are bison or cow. Two of these exhibit a separate, distinct stylid. However the third, which is by far the most worn down, seems to have an integrated stylid. I've seen a few pictures of bison teeth whose stylists are not completely separate from the rest of the tooth, but I don't know if that's truly indicative of not being a bison tooth. Any help is appreciated, thanks all!
  8. Vertebra help

    Hi all, found this vertebra in the Kansas River today on a sandbar. I've found everything from Pleistocene bone fragments to half-mineralized cow bone here before, but nothing of this size. It could have belonged to a cow, but I think it's a bison considering the amount of mineralization and general shape. I could use your help identifying this one! PS it is about 6 inches high, the spinous process is about 3 inches high and has been chipped across the top. It has also not been cleaned too well, hence some of the brown dirt color. Other side view
  9. Cow Tooth?

    Can anybody identify this tooth and its approximate age? I'm pretty sure it's a bovine tooth. It was found about 15-20 feet into the surf off the beach at Dauphin Island, AL. I was digging shells and such out from under the sand (under about 2 feet of water) and found this (about 4 inches under the sand under the water) along with the shells I was digging up. It looks to be modern given its condition, but then I'm not sure if this could be from being buried under sand and ocean as well. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
  10. Bison m3 Molars

    From the album TEETH & JAWS

    Two Bison sp. third lower molars of different age. This is the last tooth to emerge at maturity. The younger individual had not worn its teeth much . . . tooth wear has not reached the diagnostic isolated stylid. The older individual has worn its teeth enough to engage the isolated stylid. Note that the tooth of the older individual retains some cementum. In life, all the bison cheek teeth were wrapped in cementum. Being the softest of the three types of tooth components (enamel, dentin, and cementum), this exterior 'wrapper' is often lost on a fossil. (This image is best viewed by clicking on the button on the upper right of this page => "other sizes" => "large".)

    © Harry Pristis 2014

  11. Bos Os Coxae

    Can someone provide a clear dorsal and lateral picture of the os coxae (complete structure) of Bison bison and of an American domestic dairy cattle (say Jersey or equivalent)? Just want to see a good comparison. Many thanks!
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