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Found 20 results

  1. Hey everyone, Recently took a trip with a buddy of mine down to South Carolina to search for megalodon teeth. We found many small teeth along with some decent sized ones. These were found in the general area between Charleston and Summerville. The ruler is imperial. Big thanks to everyone who offers their guesses Pictured are three of my biggest from the whole trip. What are they?
  2. So, I've been hunting sharks teeth on and off in South Alabama since a young child. Since my two kids have gotten self sufficient, me and the wife have been taking alot of trips to the river to look for teeth. Finding the normal small teeth, for our area, got me to wondering if there were bigger teeth in our area. That led me to some late nights of researching the ins and outs of my area. The area we are close to has alot of Eocene era fossils and I quickly learned the Carcharocles auriculatus was THE SHARK during this time period. So, my goal became to find a complete tooth in my little honey hole. We would spend weekend after weekend at the river with the kids. My 8yo and 3yo right there with us digging and sifting! Both who want nothing more than to become paleontologist when they get older and sit there picking out ray plates, vertebrae, and teeth with excitement growing every time they see something in the sifter. Over the past several weeks, we have dug 100s of teeth and many other cool fossils which I have added to our collection but just chips of the elusive Carcharocles auriculatus teeth were all we were finding. Last night while at church, I was talking with a family about our finds thus far. You could see their kid's eyes lighting up with curiosity and they asked if we could take them sometime. We had originally planned on taking time to do some house stuff but I could tell their kids really wanted to go. We made a plan to meet this morning before the rain. We made the long hike to the hunting grounds and began to dig and sift. One after the other, the kids and their parents were yelling with excitement finding their first teeth! I was digging around getting dirt for them to sift when I felt that unmistakable sound of hitting something solid. I cleaned around the area and I saw a serrated edged tooth. Surely not...not a complete tooth. I carefully cleaned around the area to make sure not to damage it. I couldn't believe my eyes. A full tooth! I began to shake a little with excitement. I pulled it from the earth and showed everyone. This only pumped them up even more. Although this tooth is rare for our area, we kept digging with no luck of finding another one. The rain began to come in so we cut the trip short but I've babied this thing around all day, picking it up to make sure it is real and I wasn't dreaming. I know it's no 4" tooth but for me, it may as well be. It's become an infatuation for me and the family, so much so I have been looking at planning a family vacation around fossil hunting. My 8yo has expressed alot of interest in finding a megalodon tooth. So, if you guys and gals know of a good place I can take the family to do something like this please share! Below are a few pictures of the things we have found over the past few months as well as my Carcharocles auriculatus tooth I found today.
  3. Carcharocles

    This group of teeth should be from the Eocene period? Carcharocles Auriculatus I am guessing due to the size of the cusp?? Teeth are 1.4" and found in the Chandler bridge formation.
  4. DKNC-001 Carcharocles auriculatus (Togo)

    From the album Elasmobranchs

    TFF DKNC-001 Tooth height is 2-3/8 inches (≈6 cm)

    © David Kn.

  5. Hey all! This week my colleagues and I published a paper we spent most of the last decade sweating over. It is an exhaustive report of all known late Miocene-Pleistocene records of teeth of Otodus (aka Carcharocles) megalodon teeth from the west coast in an attempt to estimate the date at which O megalodon went extinct. Aside from some conspiracy theorists who will wait until they die and not see a live 'meg', we all know it's not living today as there is not a shred of positive evidence indicating its existence. We know it's around in the Miocene, and the early Pliocene. Did it survive into the Pleistocene? End of the Pliocene? or become extinct sometime earlier? These questions require serious thought because it has direct implications for whether or not O. megalodon went extinct at the same time as a bunch of weird marine mammals or if it was killed off by a supernova known to have occurred 2.6 Ma. An earlier study pooled fossil occurrences from around the globe and statistically reconstructed a mean extinction date of 2.5 Ma, with significant error (~3.6 Ma to 100ky in the future being the max and min extinction dates). We found that in the California record, reliable occurrences are only found in early Pliocene rocks. All examples of late Pliocene or Pleistocene teeth were either poorly dated, reworked from Miocene rocks, had poor provenance, or are completely missing (and never photographed) and therefore the identification cannot be confirmed. We thus predicted a 3.6 Ma extinction date. To test this, we re-analyzed the dataset published in 2014 but chucked a bunch of bad data and exhaustively re-researched the stratigraphy of each locality and corrected about 3/4 of the dates in the remaining dataset, and added our new California records. When we analyzed this corrected dataset, our margin of error (the time between the max and min extinction dates) shrank from 3.6 million year long interval to 900,000 years; *probably* extinct by 3.6 Ma (mean extinction date), definitely by 3.2 Ma (min extinction date), and possibly as early as 4.1 Ma (max extinction date). This extinction therefore precedes the 2.6 Ma supernova, as well as the Plio-Pleistocene marine mammal extinction (which in all likelihood was not a mass extinction or an extinction event, rather just a period of higher extinction/origination rate). About 4 Ma is when fully serrated Carcharodon carcharias teeth show up in the North Atlantic, indicating when the two overlapped, however briefly. We think this biotic event matches best - the mechanics of exactly how this was driven are to be figured out by someone else, but perhaps adult Carcharodon outcompeted juvenile O/C megalodon prior to becoming gigantic. Some analyses of Otodus lineage growth rate is going to be necessary. Here's the open access paper here: https://peerj.com/articles/6088/ Here's a blog writeup I did for PeerJ here: https://peerj.com/blog/post/115284881293/early-pliocene-extinction-of-the-mega-toothed-shark-otodus-megalodon-boessenecker/ Excellent summary in Nat Geo: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2019/02/megalodon-extinct-great-white-shark/ CNN: https://www.cnn.com/2019/02/14/us/megalodon-extinct-earlier-scli-intl/index.html Fox News: https://www.foxnews.com/science/megalodon-shocker-huge-killer-shark-may-have-been-wiped-out-by-great-whites Forbes: https://www.forbes.com/sites/melissacristinamarquez/2019/02/14/great-white-sharks-may-be-the-reason-why-giant-megalodon-shark-is-extinct/#6a06986a6486 Daily Mail: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-6700495/Giant-50-foot-long-predatory-shark-went-extinct-one-million-years-earlier-previously-thought.html
  6. Megalodon or Chubutensis?

    Hello everyone, If you saw my most recent trip report, you know that I just found my first meg tooth! However, I'm not entirely sure whether the tooth is from Carcharocles megalodon or Carcharocles chubutensis. The tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is the northernmost part of the Calvert Cliffs. The sediments exposed in the cliffs here are from the Calvert Formation, roughly 18-22 million years old. This would be right around the time when the great Megalodon first emerged. I remember reading that the majority of megateeth found at Brownies are chubs, but that megs have also been found there. What I'd like to know is which one my tooth is: Meg or Chub? It looks to me like if the tooth were complete, it would have the defining residual cusps of chubutensis, but unfortunately the blade is broken on both sides right by the root. The bourlette is missing, but that is a characteristic of every shark in the mega lineage so that doesn't really matter. The tooth is approximately 1 3/4 inches, and not quite as thick as I would've expected. As you can see on my trip report and Hop 5 post, my current ID for this tooth is C. chubutensis, but that is subject to change should someone with better knowledge on megatooth identification give their opinion. One last possibility is that it may be a transitional meg, meaning the shark was a blurred line between megalodon and chubutensis. Any input is appreciated. Thanks!
  7. Carcharocles megalodon (Joe Cōcke collection)

    From the album Elasmobranchs

    I do not own this rare tooth. It is from the collection of paleontologist Joe Cōcke, which he found locally and gladly allowed me to photograph.
  8. This Summer’s Finds

    Hello all! While these are all only pieces of teeth, I have found two species I never have before. I found an angustidens as well as a small GW fragment. If any of my ID guesses are wrong, feel free to point them out. Thanks for looking. Also, notice the serrations in the close ups of the GW fragment and how they differ from the close ups of a baby meg.
  9. Megalodon teeth

    From the album Sharks and fish

    Megalodon tooth and tooth fragments.
  10. Hi there, i found this today within the shingle at Walton on the Naze in Essex, UK. The usual teeth found here are striatolamia and Otodus but in humble opinion this doesn’t appear like any of those. Dare I say more like carcharocles (is that spelled right?) I’m trying to not get too excited but any help would be appreciated.
  11. So, I have acquired a specimen of every species from cretolamna to C. megalodon. Now I just need to get better representatives, or ones that fit the bill better (posteriors, around 2 inches, and curved to the right). The last specimen is coming in the mail later this month (a auriculatus). I need to find a new otodus, a larger angy, a complete meg, and maybe an aksauticus that curves right. Here’s the set without auriculatus, I’ll update this thread with it once it comes. I’ll have to get working on the GW shark line next, that one will be MUCH harder...
  12. There are many debates over nomenclature in the paleontological world, and although our say has little to do with any decision made, I thought it would be fun to see what it would be like if we did decide such matters. Today, I ask your opinions on one of these. This is the debate over the placement of the deceased shark that goes by the species name hastilis. After a lengthy talk on a random thread (sorry mods) with @Macrophyseter I thought it would be intresting to see others view points. You have three choices, Isurus the genus in which the makos sit, long held to be the genus where hastilis belongs, Carcharodon which is the genus of the great white which is widely held to be the successor of hastilis via escheri and hubbelli, or Cosmopolitodus the proposed Genus for hastilis, planus, escheri, and a few other sharks. Be sure to explain your reasoning below. Here is a picture of hastilis and Carcharodon carcharias partially for your reference and partially to show off As an added incentive, which ever one wins out will be on the label for hastilis in the evolution set of megalodon and the white shark I'm working on. Have fun!
  13. Shark's teeth and molar?

    I just spent a week at North Topsail Beach in North Carolina and had never found a single shark's tooth in my life before this trip. My daughter's boyfriend found a tooth and showed me what to look for. I ended up finding about 100 teeth before the week was out. Anyway, among my finds were several large shark's teeth and one that looks to be a molar of some sorts. I'm hoping you guys can help identify these for me. Here are pics of the molar...
  14. Hello everyone, I've been hunting the creeks, beaches, banks, streams, and rivers around Charleston since I was about 10 years old. As my passion for the hobby grew, so did my determination to scout new sites and find bigger and better fossils. Ive stayed above the waterline for the most parts, putting in thousands and thousands of hours in the mud and marl. In that time I've found very few megalodon teeth, generally in worn condition, which is typical for Mio-Plio layers locally. Because of this, my goal for years has been to find a well-preserved four inch anterior tooth from a Carcharocles angustidens. Ive come close to realizing this goal several times - I found a great lower tooth on the Edisto River that was just shy of the magic mark, and another upper missing a root lobe, but I had never found the 4-incher I've dreamt of. Until today... This tooth is an absolute beast. It seems like teeth of this size and quality are rare to find in the Ashley Formation, particularly in the reworked sediments I hunt, which makes this find particularly gratifying. The nick to the tip looks to be a compression fracture, indicative of feeding damage. Otherwise, this tooth is about 100%. I couldn't be happier. To make things better, it was sitting about a foot away from another beautiful smaller angustidens - a hunting day to remember for sure. Keep dreaming The monster - And his little brother -
  15. Megalodon evolution?

    Hey all! Sorry to bother you again with my Megalodon questions, but I'm very curious about this fascinating beast. So I found this picture on Google. In my previous topic about Megalodon, we discussed about the genus of the species, and Otodus came as the answer. Now this picture (which still represents Megalodon as Carcharocles) shows the succession of species till Megalodon. Seeing that it starts with Otodus obliquus, and then goes on with the Carcharocles genuses, I was wondering something: if Megalodon is actually considered as Otodus, should auriculatus, angustidens and chubutensis also be considered as Otodus? Best regards to all, Max
  16. Hello everyone! Something has been confusing me for a long time, so now I finally want to spit it out. What is the "real" megalodon species? I am asking this because I have seen many different genera associated with the same species name: Carcharodon megalodon, Carcharocles megalodon, Megaselachus megalodon, Otodus megalodon, etc. And I know that two completely different genera can have the same species name (eg: Liopleurodon ferox and Titanosuchus ferox, etc.), but the thing is that with the megalodon all the teeth look a lot like each other (or as we say in French: comme deux gouttes d'eau). Now I wouldn't be surprised to learn that there is a lot of paleontological debate going over this topic, but I would still like to know what the "real" megalodon species is, or at leat according to you, and why. What do you have to say? Max
  17. sc shark tooth

    i found this tooth in a ditch near summerville. it was laying on the bottom and im not sure what the different formations look like. it was a lot of whitish rocks sitting on top of light colored clay in the banks and the same clay on the bottom of the creek/ditch. from what i looked up the hawthorne formation was around the area but i dont know too much still new at this. is this an angustidens? its over 3 1/2 inches. and the root looks different than the others i found but ive never found one over 3. thought maybe it was an auriculata after looking at some pictures.
  18. megalodon

    Field collected in 2012.
  19. As most people, I would much rather find a fossil myself than buy or trade for a fossil, but there are those fossils that come up (and are within your reach) that you simply can't resist. Being a "cusp nut," this C. auriculatus is one of those rare occasions for me. This South Carolina monster measures 3.8" and is as solid as they come. What sold me on this tooth was the tip - you just don't see many big teeth with an intact tip serration. Enjoy! -HZJ P.S. I wonder if it's an upper or a lower tooth?
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