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Found 239 results

  1. Weird Fossil ( Missouri )

    Location is in Missouri The area is dated to the Pennsylvanian Formation: Probably apart of the Raytown limestone member Found this weird fossil on my latest fossil hunting trip, I personally believe it to be some sort of Amminoid since the pattern seems to extend away from the shell and not towards it, but I have only found Nautiloids in the area ( Only 2 spiral shaped specimens that do not look like this and 3 cone shaped.) If anyone can Identify if this is a an Ammonoid or something else I would love to know more! the middle Section with the weird ball like pattern in the middle and what I assume are gas chambers around it
  2. Devonian Identification Dilemma

    Recently I have taken interest in fossil hunting after discovering a plethora of fossils from some farmland in Southern Indiana. It is my understanding the fossils are from the Devonian period. My grandsons (5 and 6 years old) and I have collected several specimens I’ve the last couple of months. I have been searching the Internet for weeks trying to correctly identify our finds and just when I think I have something identified —I find other possibilities. I would like to make displays for the grandkids and label our other collections appropriately. I am in hopes this community would help identify the specimens, and provide advice on how best to label the fossils. I appreciate any assistance that can be provided. Thanks. —Bill Shingleton PS: All the fossils depicted are from Jeffersonville, IN.
  3. Belemnite Cephalopod Art

    Few months back my girlfriend and I stumbled upon a nice deposit of Belemnites in a new area we were exploring, some examples better then others. We decided to make a little art piece to display in the house of the epic afternoon we had! Here is our Belemnite sun. Let us know what you think!
  4. Howdy folks, Having trouble ID’ing this fossil. Im fairly certain it’s a cephalopod but I haven’t had much luck finding an ID. It’s of unknown origin but was found in Texas. It’s a creek fossil basically. I believe this is the side but I’m not certain. No finishing work has been done other than rinse and nylon brush. Opposite side with view of back Bottom?
  5. Domatoceras Perhaps?

    So most of what I find is Metacoceras or Pseudorthoceras, two very common cephalopods locally. I've found a few Solenochilus, but they are different enough that I know what I found right away. This specimen was discovered as a body chamber. I thought Metacoceras, because, why not? Anything of this shape usually is. After some moderate prep, I revealed some more body chamber, but not any suture marks. The venter is oddly shaped as well, with a shallow U shape. It might be crushed, so I didn't pay it too much mind. I also discovered that the body chamber is much larger than any Metacoceras specimen I have found to date. In viewing the paper A NAUTILOID CEPHALOPOD FAUNA FROM THE PENNSYLVANIAN WINTERSET LIMESTONE OF JACKSON COUNTY, MISSOURI (full paper), I found plate 5 which features Domatoceras. They are known to exist here, but I've never found anything definitive. Here is the plate from the article: Here is a Metacoceras (CG-0071) on the left, and the specimen in question (CG-0068) on the right. Here is the venter of CG-0068 showing the two ridges marked with arrows. I feel these are similar to the ridges shown in Figure 2 of Plate 5 And that is that. Any cephalopod people have an opinion? I could prep it more, it's just at the labor intensive micro prepping state right now with solid cement like limestone overlaying it. One more photo of it for some additional context:
  6. How do you distinguish between tentaculites and orthoconic cephalopod fossils?
  7. I found a key to figure out a species of Solenochilus, and I would like to attempt to create a visual guide of the differences in the key. Usually it's a A/B situation. While it's clearly written, I'm still having some trouble figuring out what the difference is. So to start: Suture with ventral saddle. Suture with ventral lobe. I've found this, but it seems like this type of suture has both: Solenochilus has an exposed siphuncle, so the middle (venter) suture is usually interrupted by this. It's also usually straight. I have another 11-14 measurements aside from this first one. Help Update: This is the entire guide for those curious: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1hvqE3_MH0ke0XKCPgL2YeOaddCsIEOU5uOQyZxypCqU/edit?usp=sharing
  8. Help with ID

    Hi! This fossil was found in Middle Tennessee. I have asked a few people what they think it is and their answers have been straight shelled cephalopod and internal structure of a belemnite (which is basically the same, isn’t it)? What do you think? If it is an internal structure of the belemnite, is it the phragmocone? Thank you for your help!
  9. Is This a Nautiloid Cephalopod?

    Hi everyone. The other day I found this interesting impression in a rock. When I first saw it, I noticed that it looked similar to the sutures inside a cephalopod shell, but I thought it may have been wishful thinking and was probably something else. I took it home and asked on Reddit, and another user also said that they believed it was probably a nautiloid shell. So, I'm coming here for final verification. Is this a nautiloid shell? The fossil was found in northwest Michigan, along Lake Michigan. Thanks in advance!
  10. ID Help Please, Something in Limestone.

    Hunting the Mazon Creek last weekend, my wife found this piece in the creek while hunting for Mazon Creek Fossils. What do you think ?? Any help appreciated !! Thanks for checking it out !! Phil
  11. Last year while on a fishing trip in Ithaca, NY I found this as well as some brachiopods in a small outcrop of shale along a stream. I’m pretty sure it’s Devonian in age but I haven’t been able to identify the species.
  12. What kind of cephalopod is this?

    So I found both of these specimens a while back and just assumed it was some sort of cephalopod, but I’m not sure what kind. They were both found in the same area in west Michigan. Any information on these would be really helpful, thank you!
  13. What is This ?

    I found this steinkern in the Maastrichtian, Peedee Form. of SE North Carolina. It is 5 inches long, 2 1/2 inches wide. Any ideas ? Thanks
  14. Ordovician inverts are not my specialty, and thus I have a few that I would appreciate some help narrowing down the species on. The first three are from the Upper Ordovician Platteville Group (Mifflin Member I think). 1) A large cephalopod section. 2) What I think is a bivalve steinkern. Not sure if a species can be ascertained. 3) A tiny trilo pygidium. 4) This last one is from the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group. My guess is Eochonetes? Any thoughts @Tidgy's Dad? Thanks for any help.
  15. I was taking pics of my Lake Jacksboro finds and came across what I thought was a regular cephalopod, orthoceras or somesuch, but on closer inspection, it does not have the chambers like all the others. It really looks more like a belemnite, but I am pretty sure those did not exist in the Pennsylvanian era? Correct me if wrong please! I then thought it was an ehinoid spine, but there is a distinct siphuncle opening on the end, (sorry for the pic, was the best I could do). So does anyone know the proper ID for this? Thanks in advance! Measurement is in inches. another small orthocone I found...with obvious chambers
  16. This is the 3rd post of features from a limetone/dolostone rock, found loose in a river, presumably carried south from the limestone bedrock further north. If this is just chert concretion, not a fossil, then Q How did the parallel grooves form? The grooves in this feature had been emclosed in soft chalky dolostone material until I removed it with vinegar baths and much rubbing, so were not caused by weathering and are not glacial striae. And last, this is one of several bonelike features in this rock, that I understand are just chert, but the structure of the end looks bone-like to me. It was seeing these bone-like features sticking out of a normal limestone rock that caused me to soak the rock in several vinegar baths and keeping rubbing and brushing, which exposed all the small features with parallel grooves in this 3-post post.
  17. This is one of several features I uncovered in a limestone/dolostone loose rock in a river. Only the "gingko leaf" end of the worm-like feature was exposed: the "worm" was enclosed in soft chalky dolostone that I removed with vinegar baths and much rubbing - so the "worm" had not been subject to weathering. From the Pivabiska River, 20 km north of Hearst, Northern Ontario, Canada, presumably carried south by glaciers from limestone bedrock farther north. I've been told it is a chert concretion, but could it be a chert-ified fossil? Q: If it's not a fossil and just concretion, how did the parallel grooves form? (The other features have parallel grooves too).
  18. This is one of several features (will be 3 posts) in a limestone/dolostone matrix, from loose rock in a river, presumably carried south by the glaciers from the limestone bedrock further north. Pivabiska River 20 km north of Hearst, Northern Ontario, Canada. These features were INSIDE soft chalky dolostone that I removed with several vinegar baths and much rubbing; these features were not exposed to weathering. So my Q is, What caused the parallel grooves? What made the lattice-like inside? I've been told these are chert concretions, but could they be chert-ized fossils? Another post to come...
  19. Leicester Pyrite Member. This layer between the Windom and the Geneseo black shale represents a sea of death. I find very few types of fossils in this hard to process layer of solid pyrite. Well preserved cephalopods and Placoderm armor (Placodermi is a class of armored prehistoric fish) are the most common fossils found. This very thin horizon can be easily found in the outcrop if you just look for rust dripping down and staining the grey shales below this pyrite layer. Every year or two, a piece of Leicester Pyrite will fall from its position high up in the outcrop and slide down to the creeks edge. It takes a lot of work to process the pyrite for fossils. Every blow with your hammer delivers the strong smell of sulfur and a ton of sparks. The reward for all this patience and hard work are fossils preserved in brilliant fools gold. This unit is also the only rocks in my area that routinely contain the armor of Placoderm fish. Click this link for a detailed description of this unusual formation - http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.835.6976&rep=rep1&type=pdf&fbclid=IwAR0qdFymJq-Hd1_SqU3j3yDw5Trl0ih_KohTv-26Du3b1m9g9s2IYKlW0Xc
  20. Orthoceras, and?????

    Bought this for $5.00 at an estate sale this weekend..........so.......there's absolutely no information on it, but someone prepped this. I believe it contains two species of Orthoceras? - off to the side, is this a different species?, or just a different plane of the same species?.......sorry- don't have specific measurements but the prominent one is about 1" wide and 7" long.......thanks! Bone
  21. Good morning folks. I have a Dolorthocera pseudorthocerid, nautiloid cephalopod. It's Carboniferous period from Serpuhovian Stage, Brontsy quarry, Kaluga region of Russia. Can anyone confirm the ID or provide a link where I can perform some additional research? Thanks in advance.
  22. Fluorescent Bacculites.jpg

    From the album Fossil Flourescence

    I was playing around with the UV lamp in my lab, seeing what might unexpectedly glow this afternoon. This was a nice surprise. It's an internal mold of Bacculites sp. with sutures that fluoresce orange under 345nm UV light. Bright orange like this usually indicates calcite, a mineral that makes up fossil shells and some modern ones, too. Between the mud-filled chambers, the shell was preserved while the exterior of the cone wore away. The shell material was either calcite to begin with or, more likely, began as aragonite (same chemical compound as calcite, but different crystal structure and glows yellow instead of orange) and changed over millions of years to the more stable configuration of calcite. Meanwhile, the mud looks like it may have a little bit of some fluorescent minerals in the mix, but it's mostly a daylight-only affair. The blue may be some residual glue from a label. This specimen is from the late Cretceaous Pierre Shale Formation in South Dakota.

    © C. 2020 Heather J M Siple

  23. Widder Fm.: This is not Tornoceras

    I came home this afternoon in some ridiculously warm weather for January (50F, 10C) and happened to look at a rock I'd collected from the Widder formation about two or three years ago that I had sitting out weathering. It was one that @Kane had quarried from his Gonaitite perch out of the Widder formation and kicked down to me. I'd originally kept the rock because it had a bunch of Mucrospirifer thedfordensis in it and I wanted to see what else would erode out of it. When I turned the rock over I spotted a small round fossil that was brownish... a different color than most fossils. It was pyritized so I chipped it out of the rock and took a look at it. It was a Gonaitite and one that I had never seen before! Most Gonaitites that I have found at Arkona are from the Arkona formation and fall into the Tornoceras arkonense genus, but this one is different. Tornoceras arkonense above, mystery Gonaitite below. I used a new tool that I recently purchased, a home tattoo pen, to clean out one side of it. The pen is quite effective on softer shale or limestone as long as the fossil is much harder. In this case it was pyritized so I didn't have to worry about damaging the fossil. It turns out that this specimen has a smaller diameter phragmocone than Tornoceras arkonense as there are prominent ridges (rather than gaps as in T. arkonense) along the sutures. The suture pattern is plain with a sweeping parabola facing backwards, a straightish line across the keel and then another parabola. I've looked into the usual sources ("CHECK LIST OF FOSSIL INVERTEBRATES DESCRIBED FROM THE MIDDLE DEVONIAN ROCKS OF THE THEDFORD-ARKONA REGION OF SOUTHWESTERN ONTARIO", Stumm and Wright, Paleontology of New York, Hall) and don't see much that correlates to what I've found. Anyone have an idea? The fossil itself is 7/16" (11mm) at it's widest and 2/16" (4mm) thick. It comes from the Middle Devonian aged (Givetian stage) Widder formation at Hungry Hollow, Ontario, Canada. Thanks for looking!
  24. Cephalopod or Rugose coral

    Hi is this a Cephalopod or a Rugose coral it’s from the Onondaga formation. I have been told that it could be a a Cephalopod by one person and Rugose coral by another. Thank you!
  25. I found a drainage ravine with thousands of these these in them. I'm almost certain they're an iron concretion of some type but I've gotten several different identifications. I took a few of them to the MAPS expo last spring for an ID. One person said michelinoceras, but then an expert on cephalopods said no, definitely not, but he had also never seen anything like them. These were found on the north side of Dubuque, IA right at the top of the lower Galena dolomite just above the upper chert beds. They are in a thick sticky grey clay which sits just above a thick iron rich encrusted layer that varies from 1/4 to 1/2 inch thick (blackend hardground?). The clay layer is approximately 20' thick and contains thousands of these. They are almost all vertically oriented, cylindrical in shape, and vary from 1/2 inch to as much as 6 inches in diameter, and vary in length from several inches to several feet long. Some of the smaller ones that have weathered out do look amazingly like cephalopods. I had previously found a few pinky finger sized weathered ones farther down the ravine and thought cephalopod but then found the clay with the bigger ones. They have a center that resembles a siphuncle but I don't see anything that looks like septa or individual chambers. There are too many of these to think they haven't been found before but I can't seem to find anything describes them specifically for this area. I did find a paper from a study done in Finland titled "Ferruginous Concretions Around Root Channels and Fine Sand Deposits". That paper seems to describe what these may be be but since I've gotten a couple different ID's and none of them concretion I was hoping someone with a little more knowledge can tell me for sure. url to the research paper - https://doi.org/10.17741/bgsf/47.1-2.020
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