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Found 182 results

  1. Cephalopod id

    Can anyone give me for information about this Cephalopod? Found in Pike County PA near the Delaware Water Gap National Rec. Area. Devonian shale. The wide end is 3/4", the visible part is 1 1/4" long.
  2. Hi, I am wondering what the white globular mineral growths are on this dolomitized Dawsonoceras mold. Calcite? Thanks for any help.
  3. Nautiloid Cephalopod?

    Found in a creek East Fork Lake in Cincinnati. 14 centimeters in length. It looked to me like a nautiloid because of its shape but it doesn't have any of the distinctive markings like a nautiloid does. Someone suggested that it could be a cast. You can see the imprint of the rest of the fossil. What it looks like now after I broke the rest of the rock apart Opening of the cone shape, looks like a brachiopod? Nautiloid Cephalopod markings I'm talking about:
  4. I found this ammonite on Saturday. It is the best Trachyscaphites springer I have ever found. I think it is a T. springer. I assume the other ones I have are males and maybe this one is a female. I don't know much about sexual dimorphism in this genus, but it does exist. When they say there is dimorphism is the female is bigger? It is so very different from any of the others I have. I know there is another species of Trachyscaphites in the NSR, but I don't know what it looks like. I really like this one though. It is free standing too! Bonus. It has some damage on the dorsal venter and the aperture. It also had some pyrite on the umbilicus area (I can’t really see an overt umbilicus since it is so involuted). My prep work is still very crude. There is so much I need to learn. I just keep at it and learn by trial and error though. I don’t have pneumatic tools. Here it is. See the white film on the right half? The white on the left half is nacre, but some of it has the film on it too. This is from the red zone of the Ozan formation, Cretaceous. I doubt it matters, but I am wondering if the film layer is pyrite in nature or gypsum or something else. I have specimens from the Britton formation of the Eagle Ford group, which have a gypsum film on them and this looks a bit little that. But that isn't my main question. It is just a curiosity. This is the other side. You can see some pyrite at the bottom left along the umbilicus grove. I have a number of these, but this is the first where I can actually see suture lines mostly at 11 to 12 o'clock down the midline and on the right. I am going to tag @Ptychodus04 and @RJB on this. I don't know if Ron is familiar with fossils of this matrial and matrix, but I imagine he is. I am pretty sure Kris is. Questions The film issue 1. Do you think I should attempt to remove the film? I think I should. See the tubercle by my thumb in pic 2? There was a tiny fleck of white showing so I chipped away at the red clay and revealed more nacre under it. So I believe there is still nacre under some of it on the left 2. What is the best way to go about removing it? I was thinking of using sandpaper, but I don't have much experience using sandpaper on fossils. I have a range of grit up to 3000 (or is it down to since the grit is smaller and finer?) The nose issue I am calling it the nose since it looks like a little nose. It seems to be the first part of the first visible whorl. 3. Any advice as to what to do with this part. I am not sure what to do with it. At times I prep haphazardly and then I think I have damaged it and I get paralysis of analysis and that is where I am on the nose. I have removed some matrix from the top, left and right. I think I might have gone down into the nose on the right side some. It is hard to tell where the matrix ends and fossil begins. These are other views of the nose. The lines on the nose are from me scraping away, thinking I was on top of ribs. I am not sure if there are ribs there yet. Like I said my prep skills are pretty crude still. The other side of it. I still have some matrix to removed on the side there. I think part of it is chipped away, but I am not totally sure how it is supposed to look. Maybe it got crushed. It just looks odd to me. I have several other of this species, but I think they may all be males or something. They are more open, the whorl does not cover the umbilicus and they are much flatter and smaller. The pyrite issue. I know I have asked these types of questions before about prep so sorry for the repeat. 4. What is the best way to address the pyrite to keep it from coming back? I have scraped most of it off already. I have heard people say to soak it in Iron Out and I have that. But I am concerned it may hurt the fossil. I guess I could experiment on other concretions I have that look like the same, but are rock and not fossil. 5. What should I do as far as long term preservation to slow the progress of pyrite disease? I think someone recommended Butvar. I looked into buying it, but I got sidetracked by trying to figure out which was best. Then couldn't find what was best and kind of forgot about buying again. 6. What is the best Butvar or product to use for sealing it? I looked at buying some on different sites. Paying so much for shipping irks me. I am spoiled with Amazon Prime and just don't think about shipping costs. I have a buddy who works at Eastman. I asked him if they had a store where individuals could purchase products like Butvar 76. He said no, but he would see if he could go ask for a sample The museum supply site. It has Butvar-80 for $34 for 1 kg and $15.53 for shipping. I don’t need 1 kg. Talas has Butvar-76 500 g for $17.50, but then is charging $14.64 for shipping! I have seen people reference McGean-15 or Vinac and they seemed to prefer it over Butvar. 7. Can anyone tell me the molecular weight of the Vinac or what grade of polyvinyl acetate Vinac is? I think my buddy could come up with that for me more easily since I think he manages production of a form of it. I found something called Vinapas. I have not looked at the shipping on this site. Here: http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_37/section37_08.htm PVA Resin Solid Vinapas This consolidant is a polyvinyl acetate solid suspended in granular form, with a molecular weight averaging 51,000 and a melting point of 50 C. It is used as a consolidantfor porous, dry, non-metal objects-particularly those found in digs. This is typically applied in concentrations of 20-25% I.M.S. with a soft brush. It may also be used as an isolating varnish and thermoplastic adhesive. Item # Description Price SY01 Vinapas, 1 kg. $22.00
  5. Oyster, cephalopod, or what?

    I am at the Santa Rosa Gem and Mineral show and one of the vendors had this on display, labeled as an oyster. I’m not sure that’s correct and the lady said it could also be a cephalopod. Looks to me like a loosely coiled ammonite, what does everyone think?
  6. Prepping nodules with Bactrites

    Although the most pieces of my collection are goniatites, I am more than happy to add other Devonian cephalopods to my collection from time to time. On my last field trip for devonian cephalopods I splitted a few nodules and some of them had a few uncommon fossils in them: Bactrites I rarely find decent fragments of them, but those few were looking promising. Bactrites, although they look like an orthocone are in fact straight Ammonoids and not a Nautiloid. the septas start to be slightly ondulated, but most important they have a ventral siphuncle, a typical trait of an Ammonoid. the first nodule had a fragment sticking out, and when I split the nodule another one was found inside. I kept both parts of the nodule and prepped the one inside and on top After prepping them I found out that neither of those were complete, but the were decent in size and well preserved. The second nodule on the other hand hand was much better, a piece of the Bactrites was sticking out from both ends of the nodule, so I new I had a complete specimen. The prepping was relatively hard as different parts of the cone had different forms of preservation, but in the end I got the whole specimen out of the matrix and is my best Bactrites until now. enjoythe pictures: 1st nodule with the specimen inside: after prepp: After prep with the top of the nodule containing an other fragment. prepp on the 2nd nodule: after prepp, with the different kinds of preservation visible: and the whole lot:
  7. Is This A Cephalopod?

    I found this rock in a creek in middle Tennessee. (Mississippian, St. Louis Limestone & Warsaw Limestone) It has several fossil imprints and I’m wondering if the circled one is a cephalopod. If not, can anyone tell me what is it?
  8. Spyroceras? New York

    Been having some heavy wind and storms. Found this on the shore of Lake Ontario in Henderson Harbor, NY. From what I have researched online and previous posts, thinking this is Spyroceras? Decent size too. Very happy with this and found it in a couple pieces so had to glue back together. Can anyone confirm or help to to ID? Rock is mostly Shale and Limestone. Area Ordovician in age from what I have been told.
  9. Locally, I find quite a few large cephalopods. Here is an example: Unfortunately this specimen was deteriorated. and I collected only it's exposed siphuncle. After gluing it back together, I noticed definite narrowings that I do not understand. Other siphuncles I have found have raised areas on them, not narrowings. Any ideas on this anatomical aspect??? Here is another cephalopod I found that day. Love the crystals inside.
  10. Texas Heteromorph ID

    I went hunting in the rain yesterday. It wasn’t one of my most successful hunts, but I still managed to find some cool stuff. I found this in The Grayson Formation, Cretaceous in the Denton, TX area. I had never hunted that area of the Grayson before and it was different as every area of the Grayson seems to be. I found this section of a heteromorph. I don’t believe it is a Mariella. I am wondering if it could be a section of Turrilites. I believe it only has 2 rows of tubercles. Any thoughts? Side view Top down view Edge view
  11. I can't seem to find an ID for this find. I believe this may be a siphuncle. What do you guys think? The "V" shaped sutures are really throwing me off. Has anyone seen a straight shelled cephalopod with this "V" pattern? Kinda neat how you can see how this was buried, preserving one side as it weathered the other. Then along came a dozen crinoids or so a used it as a nice base.
  12. Ichthyosaur stomach contents

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Cross sections of the stomach, full of squid/cephalopod hooks and beaks, of an early Jurassic ichthyosaur (Stenopterygius quadriscissus). One slice has the animals ribs, the lighter tan objects, around the stomach, while the other is entirely of the stomach contents.
  13. Found this that I believe is a cephalopod today at a devonian spot with imported material, I haven't seen a cephalopod with a bulbed tip before so I am not sure if it's some sort of pathology of a species or it's own species.
  14. Hi Everyone, I suddenly have a work trip to the Black Hills of South Dakota coming up next week and I'd like to get out and collect some fossils along the way. I'm driving from Denver to Lead, SD and will be driving north on HW 85 and 18 through Newcastle. I'd be really happy to get a few stops in along the way and any potential information would really be great. Unfortunately, I won't have a ton of time to be able to stop and really dig, so some road cuts or target formations would be super helpful for surface collecting. I'm open to every type of fossil. I know there's a lot of fossils in that section of the state so I'm looking forward to hopefully finding some decent stuff! Thanks! Caleb
  15. Unidentified Object from East Tennessee

    Hello all, I found this in a steam in East Tennessee about 20 years ago. I'm new to fossils so I was wondering if anyone could help identify. I spoke with a marine archaeologist who thought it might be a cephalopod or part of a trilobite. Thank you, Michael
  16. I have not gotten out much locally this summer due to a few issues. Forced myself to step away from my current stresses and hunt some fossils along the Minnesota Iowa border. Found some nice brachs, cephalopods, rugosa coral, gastropods, and fisherites. Nothing special, but it was nice being out again. When I returned home, I was going to hammer a little matrix away from a few of my collections. A large slab had a worn cephalopod in it and I was going to break it out and put it in with the fossils I take to the children's sand pit at a local park. With one swing of the hammer, I decided this one was NOT going to the park! It is amazing how often this happens to me. I wonder how many nice fossils have been left behind only because I quit breaking the rock. Two beautiful Maclurites and a Hormatoma laid hidden underneath the matrix surrounding the cephalopod.
  17. The missus and I spent a good part of the day at our spot in the middle Devonian. I chopped out several large slabs while Deb split some of the smaller chunks and managed some overburden duty. The split in the wall may seem promising, but there are a lot of interlocking pieces that have to be removed in sequence, something like taking apart a jigsaw puzzle, but needing to locate the key stones first.
  18. New Eurypterid fossils

    I went again to Lang's Quarry for the day to look for Eurypterids and associated fauna and had a very successful day with Mr Lang.
  19. Hello all. This is a cephalopod that was found by Darktooth Dave on our last outing at Deep Springs Road. (Middle Devonian, Moscow Formation, Hamilton Group, Lebanon, NY. ) He kindly gifted me the slab this was in. While trying to break down the slab, as it was quite huge, (2ft by 2ft, by 3" thick) the darn thing popped out. No other pieces to remove, just the one. This is the first slightly coiled cephalopod of this type that I've seen from there, so I'm struggling with an ID. Not only that, but it has an encrusting example of Hederella filiformis on it. Ultra cool specimen! Thanks again, @Darktooth! I'm guessing this is either a Gomphoceras, or a Cyrtoceras? Anyone have any other thoughts, on genus/species? Thanks for any help, and for looking.
  20. Ordovician - Southern Ontario - ID please?

    Hello. I found this in Mimico Creek in Toronto, Ontario. Could someone please tell me what it might be? I thought maybe some kind of cephalopod, but really have no idea. Thanks! Camille
  21. Managed to get out to a site I haven’t been to before, and found lots of cephalopods and gastropods. I recently got back into geocaching (my husband and I used to geocache as students about 10 years ago, back when you had to use a handheld gps unit. Now you can just use a smartphone.) Anyways, we didn’t collect at this location, since the geocache makes it an excellent learning resource for people who don’t know much about fossils. A few photos attached.
  22. My daughter and I have started fossil hunting and came across this a few weeks ago. Pretty sure the ribbed-item (near the tip of my thumb) is a cephalopod, but unsure what the rest of the white pieces are? Thought they might be pieces of bone, or possibly wood? Not sure? Hoping someone could shed some light. Found this on the Bruce Peninsula (Ontario, Canada), on the Georgian Bay shoreline. Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks, Kristin.
  23. Thedford Area Finds

    Spent a solid six hours in full sun and heat, with biting deer flies, moving rock at my secluded spot. Temps were about 30 C, but closer to 40 with humidity and heat off the rocks. Mostly splitting mid Devonian rock from the Widder Fm. Mostly looking for trilobites, which can be a game of inches... too far up or down in the strata, you get blanks or brachs. First up, a few brachs. These can cluster up in massive beds. The first one was fairly large but I left it there. I did keep the second one as the long tips are fragile and rarely come out whole.
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