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Found 129 results

  1. I took advantage of the day off yesterday for Veterans Day to attempt to beat the rain with a quick stop at the Reedy Point spoils piles (Late Cretaceous; Mt. Laurel Formation) from the C&D Canal in Delaware. Unfortunately neither of those things came true - it began to rain about halfway through my visit and I collected there much longer than I expected. This was my first ever visit to the spoils piles since I have found very similar fossils before in Big Brook, which is a much closer drive for me. I didn't quite know what to expect when I arrived. What I thought were going to be large piles of dredge from the bottom of the canal turned out to be large fields covered in a layer of sandy gravel. Hence why my visit lasted much longer than I expected. For the good part of the morning and early afternoon, I scoured the area, mostly surface collecting with a little bit of sifting. I didn't find anything extraordinary, but the sheer size of the bivalve shells there was enough to make it a worthwhile trip. Notably I only ever found mostly complete shells - these bivalves must have been massive when alive! There were quite a few fossils easily found just lying on the ground Here are my finds: Gastropod Steinkern Pieces I found two types of bryozoan on shell pieces I was struck by the extent of boring by sponges (Cliona cretacica) on this shell I thought these worm tubes (Serpula implicata) were pretty cool, including one that extends from one side of the shell to the other side The largest belemnite (Belemnitella americana) I found was about 7.2 cm, which is large but not as big as the 11.2 cm belemnite I found many years ago in Big Brook Similar to the bivalves, some of the belemnites also exhibited traces of boring sponges
  2. Tiny Sea Urchin

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    So sweet! This is a very rare Cretaceous echinoid (sea urchin), Boletechinus. They are typically no more than a couple mm in diameter. This one is shown next to a pencil eraser. Most of the ones in the Smithsonian's collection come from sand and silt removed for the creation and maintenance of a canal, which exposed fossils well below the surface. This one comes from New Castle County, Delaware.
  3. Shell Made its Own Pedistal

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    A Gryphea vomer bivalve made itself at home atop the internal mold of a tiny Baculites ovatus cephalopod. The whole thing is about 3 cm tall. Found in the Cretaceous spoils sands of the C&D Canal, Delaware
  4. Nautiloid

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Eutrephoceras sp. Cretaceous C and D Canal Delaware City, Delaware Mt Laurel Fm.
  5. Shark Tooth

    From the album Delaware Fossils

    Odontaspis sp Cretaceous C and D Canal Delaware City, Delaware Mt Laurel Fm.
  6. After finding that dredging had occurred at the C&D Canal earlier this year, I decided to take two trips out to explore the area and collect some of my favorite fossils - Belemnitella americana! I had written the location off in my prior scouts for hunting spots as most resources stated that the site was picked clean after the prior dredging. Thankfully, the renewed piles of spoils were bountiful and I brought back a haul of about 300+ Belemnites including a monster 10cm one and many various bivalves such as oyster and scallops. Not too bad for a noob hunter!
  7. Crinoid or coral, maybe Fletcheria?

    Found on the Delaware coast, in the surf. The segmented columns are irregular, waving independently as opposed to a regular pattern as in a hard coral. They seem to come out of a central stem like a crinoid, but there are so many tendrils, I am doubting that guess. My 7 yo son found it and is dying to learn more about it, so a genus would help a lot. Thanks! Paul
  8. Why I Love Blacklight!

    Whenever I bring home a new batch of fossils, I pull out my UV rock lamp. Why? Some fossils glow in the dark, but not in a uniform way. Variations in the mineral composition make for a variety of colors, even when the specimen seems fairly uniform in color in daylight. This can make small, hidden details really stand out. Case in point: This afternoon I was putting away some petrified wood I'd collected awhile back. I pulled out my black light to examine them because some of the wood from this site shows a rainbow of color under UV. This one particular piece was mostly orange under UV, though in camera the hues look different. What really got my attention, however, were a few really vibrant spots on one side. Insect traces! The petrified wood chip is only about 8 cm long. Even with a magnifier, some of the small details are hard to spot. I never would have spotted them in daylight, but they were super bright with the UV. Another box I was sorting through this week contained impressions of brachiopods and trilobites in plain, white limestone. It can be hard to see the contours in the matrix, but they show up much differently under the UV. Finally, UV light can be used to identify fossil mollusks whose patterns have bleached away. About 60% of fossil shells fluoresce and some species have been described based on the residual patterns made visible under ultraviolet light. Note: To photograph these, I used a Convoy UV LED flashlight. I set my camera on a tripod for a 4 second exposure at f/22, with ISO set to 1600. I had my DSLR's white balance set for daylight.
  9. Fluorescent Silicified Cypress Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    One of Delaware's many mysteries is the petrified wood found near Odessa and Smyrna. The general consensus is that is cypress wood of some kind and it was buried under Pleistocene sediments. However, the origin of the wood and the age have yet to be figured out. Some say Miocene. Others say as old as Cretaceous. There are no other co-occurring fossils in the deposit to give any clues. The photo on the right was taken using a 395 nm UV lamp.
  10. C & D canal

    I will be heading through the area this upcoming weekend and was wondering if there are any good spots to still check out there near the Reedy Point Bridge or anywhere along the canal up to the Route 13 bridge. Thanks!
  11. Shark Tooth Identification

    Hello! I recently found this well-worn shark’s tooth on a beach in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. The serrated edges of the tooth are worn down but still visible, although it’s difficult to observe in the photos. I was wondering if anyone has any thoughts as to what species the tooth could possibly belong to? Thank you so much! Take care-
  12. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  13. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  14. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  15. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  16. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  17. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  18. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  19. Petrified Wood Under UV

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood Family Cupressaceae Miocene New Castle County, Delaware
  20. Just a short video of a quick trip to the beach last week to enjoy the spring sunshine!
  21. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  22. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  23. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  24. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
  25. Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    From the album Fluorescent Petrified Wood

    Cypress Wood, viewed under short-wave ultraviolet light Miocene Odessa, Delaware
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