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Found 2 results

  1. This is my first post in Fossil Forum...names PD, in the next couple of days I will do an introductory post in the "Introduction" section but I wanted to get started with one of my specimens that has brought me to a wall. Late Devonian - Early Carboniferous, loose find in a fossil contaminated area so identifying the exact formation it came from has been a bit difficult. Possibilities within a stones throw of find are Boone Formation, Penters Chert, Clifty Limestone, Chattanooga Shale and Pitkin Limestone. I have been calling this little guy Tholuslensia collisspongia ONLY until I can identify the actual genus and species. From my current research, I have an initial taxonomy as follows: Porifera | Demospongiae | Chaetetid | Poecilosclerida | AND THAT IS WHERE MY GIANT WALL BEGINS... As you might already be aware, Arkansas does not have a good public fossil record database (something that I am currently working on changing) and trying to identify this sponge down through family, genus and species has been like trying to find the pin cushion that the needle in the haystack came out of. The University of Arkansas focuses more on fossil fuels than actual fossils, they were quite friendly but unable to provide me with any assistance. Their Museum Collection is off limits to me because I am not a paleontologist, accredited institution or research facility. Even though I am not a paleontologist, I do believe myself capable of figuring this puzzle out. It is just one of many paleontology puzzles I am currently working on. I am not afraid of rabbit holes, big words or old paleontology text books so if you have any information or leads that can help me get past this "wall" then by all means, SHARE ;-). There is a possibility that it could have come out of the Ordovician period. The majority of exposure, sediment and specimens from this location are Devonian/Mississippian. There is one new exposure of Ordovician that has surfaced due to creek erosion. It rests below all other primary material and my collisspongia could have eroded out of that exposure based on sheer proximity to the specimens resting location. I have my doubts though because of the iron staining that has permeated the calcified sandstone.Based on the amount of orange tinting the outer surface displays, I would think that the specimen had to have eroded out and been sitting for some time now. New fractures from the Ordovician peek-a-boo seem to be lighter in color ranging from white to camel tan. This orange tint makes me believe that the Ordovician formation is not the host rock that produced my fossil. That being said, I am perfectly comfortable with the idea and most likely, the actuality of being completely and totally WRONG about everything. So long as I can get close to the truth, I am good with as many missteps as it will take. Thanks again for anything you have to offer and thank you for helping create this great resource and forum. Specifications: Length (Middle Lens Curve): 110 mm Width (Across Lens Curve): 100 mm Height (Stem to Top of Dome): 70mm Circumference (Lens Perimeter): 340 mm Substance: White chert, calcified sandstone, limestone present within folds and around bottom stem/base
  2. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since June 2, 2018. Chancelloriidae (Affinity Uncertain) Mehl, D. (1998). Porifera and Chancelloriidae from the Middle Cambrian of the Georgina Basin, Australia. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 6. Serezhnikova, E. and A.Y. Ivantsov (2007). Fedomia mikhaili - A new spicule-bearing organism of sponge grade from the Vendian (Ediacaran) of the White Sea, Russia. Palaeoworld, 16. Phylum Porifera - Sponges Class Calcarea - Calcareous Sponges Botting, J.P. and N.J. Butterfield (2005). Reconstructing early sponge relationships by using the Burgess Shale fossil Eiffelia globosa, Walcott. PNAS, Vol.102. Number 5. Finks, R.M. (1995). Some New Genera of Paleozoic Calcareous Sponges. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Number 6. (Download from site.) Kozur, H.W., H. Mostler and J.E. Repetski (2008). A New Heteractinellid Calcareous Sponge from the Lowermost Ordovician of Nevada and a Discussion of the Suborder Heteractinellidae. Geo.Alp, Vol.5, S. Mehl, D. and J. Reitner (1996). Observations of Astraeospongium meniscum (Roemer, 1848) from the Silurian of western Tennessee: morphology and palaeobiology of the Astraeospongiidae (Calcarea, Heteractinellidae). Berliner Geowiss. Abh., E 18. Wells, J.W. A New Species of Astraeospongia from the Middle Devonian of Ohio. Class Demospongiae Blissett, D.J., R.K. Pickerill and J.K. Rigby (2006). A New Species of Boring Sponge from the White Limestone Group, Jamaica. Caribbean Journal of Science, Vol.42, Number 2. Botting, J.P., P. Cardenas and J.S. Peel (2014). A Crown-Group Demosponge from the Early Cambrian Sirius Passet Biota, North Greenland. Palaeontology, 58(1). Botting, J.P., L.A. Muir and J.-P. Lin (2013). Relationships of the Cambrian Protomonaxonida (Porifra). Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.16, Issue 2. Brustur, T., P. Tibuleac and C. Costea (2007). A Possible Horny Sponge (Demospongia, Keratosida) from the Eastern Carpathian Outer Flysch (Romania). Geo-Eco-Marina, 13. Ehrlich, H., et al. (2013). Discovery of 505-million-year-old chitin in the basal demosponge Vauxia gracilenta. Scientific Reports, 3:3497. Garcia-Bellido, D.C. (2003). The demosponge Leptomitus cf. L. lineatus, first occurrence from the Middle Cambrian of Spain (Murero Formation, Western Iberian Chain). Geologica Acta, Vol.1, Number 1. Garcia-Bellido, D.C., et al. (2011). First report of Crumillospongia (Demospongea) from the Cambrian of Europe (Murero biota, Spain). Bulletin of Geosciences, 86(3). Garcia-Bellido, D.C., et al. (2007). The Demosponge Genus Leptomitus and a New Species from the Middle Cambrian of Spain. Palaeontology, Vol.50, Part 2. Hoare, R.D. (1978). Report of a Pennsylvanian Sponge New to Ohio: Heliospongia ramosa Girty (Demospongia: Heliospongiidae). Ohio J.Sci., 78(6). Johns, R.A. (1994). Ordovician Lithistid Sponges of the Great Basin. Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, NBMG Open-File Report 94-1. Kozur, H.W., H. Mostler and J.E. Repetski (1996). 'Modern' Siliceous Sponges from the Lowermost Ordovician (Early Ibexian - Early Tremadocian) Windfall Formation of the Antelope Range, Eureka County, Nevada, USA. Geol.Palaont.Mitt. Innsbruck, Vol.21. Pisera, A. (2000). New species of lithistid sponges from the Paleogene of the Ukraine. Zoosystema, 22(2). Reitner, J. and G. Worheide (2002). Non-Lithistid Fossil Demospongiae - Origins of their Palaeobiodiversity and Highlights in History of Preservation. In: Systema Porifera: A Guide to the Classification of Sponges. Hooper, J.N.A. and R.W.M. Van Soest (eds.), Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York. Rhebergen, F. (2014). A new Late Ordovician erratic anthaspidellid sponge (Porifera) originating from Baltica. Scripta Geologica, 146. Rhebergen, F. (2011). Short note on three species of Orchocladina (Demospongea, Porifera). Scripta Geologica, 143. Rhebergen, F., A. Munnecke and E. Jarochowska (2016). First report of Archaeoscyphia rectilinearis (Porifera) from the Wenlock of Gotland, Sweden. GFF, Vol.0. Rigby, J.K. and V. Gunther (2003). The Largest and Oldest Known Choia hindei (Dawson), From the Middle Cambrian of the House Range, Western Utah. BYU Geology Studies 2003, Vol.47. Rigby, J.K. and J.K. Gilland (1977). A New Fossil Sponge from the Ordovician Garden City Limestone of Southeastern Idaho. Great Basin Naturalist, Vol.37, Number 4. Senowbari-Daryan, B. and V. Zamparelli (2003). Upper Triassic (Norian-Rhaetian) New Thalamid Sponges from Northern Calabria (Southern Italy). Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai, Geologia, XLVIII, 2. Senowbari-Daryan, B. and G.D. Stanley (1992). Late Triassic Thalamid Sponges from Nevada. J.Paleont., 66(2). Class Hexactinellida Botting, J.P. and L.A. Muir (2014). First post-Cambrian records of the reticulosan sponges Valospongia and Hintzespongia from the late Tremadocian of North Wales. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(1). Botting, J.P. and L.A. Muir (2011). A new Middle Ordovician (late Daphingian) hexactinellid sponge from Cumbria, UK. Geological Journal, 46. Botting, J.P., et al. (2013). An enigmatic, possibly chemosymbiotic, hexactinellid sponge from the early Cambrian of South China. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 58(3). Bruckner, A. and D. Janussen (2003). The First Fossil Rossella (Porifera, Hexactinellida) from the Upper Cretaceous (Coniac) of Bornholm (Denmark) and Problems of Classification Within the Fossil Lyssacinosa. Ber.Inst.Geol.Palaont. K.-F.-Univ., Graz, Vol.7. Carter, H.J. (1879). On Holasterella, a Fossil Sponge of the Carboniferous Era, and on Hemiasterella, a new Genus of Recent Sponges. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 3. Carrera, M.G. and J.J. Rustan (2015). The new genus Talacastospongia: insights on the first record of a Devonian sponge from South America. Journal of Paleontology, 89(6). Chen, A.-L., et al. (2015). New articulated protospongiid sponges from the early Cambrian Chengjiang biota. Palaeoworld, 24. Harvey, T.H.P. (2010). Carbonaceous preservation of Cambrian hexactinellid sponge spicules. Biol.Lett. (2010), 6. Janussen, D. (2014). The second fossil Hyalonema species (Porifera: Hexactinellida), from the Late Cretaceous Arnager limestone, Bornholm, Denmark. Göttingen Contributions to Geosciences, 77. Mergl, M. (2008). The hexactinellid sponge Cyathophycus from the Lower Ordovician Klabava Formation of the Prague Basin, Czech Republic. Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(2). Nose, M., et al. (2014). First record of chambered hexactinellid sponges from the Palaeozoic. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 59(4). Class Homoscleromorpha Wilson, E.C. (1986). The First Tertiary Sclerosponge from the Americas. Palaeontology, Vol.29, Part 3. Class Stromatoporoidea Galloway, J.J. and G.M. Ehlers (1960). Some Middle Devonian Stromatoporoids from Michigan and Southwestern Ontario, Including the Types Described By Alexander Winchell and A.W. Grabau. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XV, Number 4. Stearn, C.W. (1997). Intraspecific Variation, Diversity, Revised Systematics and Type of the Devonian Stromatoporoid, Amphipora. Palaeontology, Vol.40, Part 3. Wolniewicz, P. (2012). Stromatoporoid diversity in the Devonian of the Ardennes: a reinterpretation. Geologica Belgica, 15/1-2. Class Undefined Botting, J.P. (2012). Reassessment of the problematic Burgess Shale sponge Takakkawia lineata Walcott, 1920. Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences, 49(9). General Porifera Porifera - Africa/Middle East Botting, J.P. (2016). Diversity and ecology of sponges in the Early Ordovician Fezouata Biota, Morocco. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 460. Rigby, J.K. and B. Senowbari-Daryan (1995). Upper Permian Inozoid, Demospongid, Hexactinillid Sponges from Djebel Tebega, Tunisia. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, New Series, Number 7. (Download from site) Porifera - Asia/Malaysia/Pacific Islands Forchielli, A., et al. (2012). Taphonomy of Cambrian (Stage 3/4) sponges from Yunnan (South China). Bulletin of Geosciences, 87(1). Li, L., et al. (2015). Unusual Deep Water sponge assemblage in South China - Witness of the end-Ordovician mass extinction. Scientific Reports, 5:16060. Stiller, F. (1998). Sponges from the lower Upper Anisian (Middle Triassic) of Bangtoupo near Qingyan, SW-China. Munster Forsch.Geol.Palaont., 85. Zhang, X.-g. and B.R. Pratt (1994). New and extraordinary Early Cambrian sponge spicule assemblage from China. Geology, Vol.22. Porifera - Australia/New Zealand Kruse, P.D. (1996). Update on the northern Australian Cambrian sponges Rankenella, Jawonya and Wagima. Alcheringa, 20. Lukowiak, M.A. (2016). Fossil and modern sponge fauna of southern Australia and adjacent regions compared: interpretation, evolutionary and biogeographic significance of the late Eocene 'soft' sponges. Contributions to Zoology, 85(1). Lukowiak, M.A. (2015). Late Eocene siliceous sponge fauna of southern Australia: reconstruction based on loose spicules record. Zootaxa, 3917(1). Mehl, D. (1998). Porifera and Chancelloriidae from the Middle Cambrian of the Georgina Basin, Australia. Palaeontology, Vol.41, Part 6. Porifera - Europe (including Greenland and Siberia) Bak, M., Z. Gorny and K. Bak (2015). Sponge growth on the Cenomanian carbonate shelves of the Carpathian Basin: a record from spicule-rich turbidites. Bulletin of Geosciences, 90(3). Botting, J.P. (2004). An exceptional Caradoc sponge fauna from the Llanfawr Quarries, Central Wales and phylogenetic implications. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 2(1). Castellani, C., et al. (2012). Isolated sponge spicules from the late Cambrian Alum Shale Formation ('Orsten' nodules) of Sweden. Bulletin of Geosciences, 87(3). Olszewska-Nejbert, D. and E. Swierczewska-Gladysz (2009). The phosphatized sponges from the Santonian (Upper Cretaceous) of the Wielkanoc Quarry (southern Poland) as a tool in stratigraphical and environmental studies. Acta Geologica Polonica, Vol.59, Number 4. Rhebergen, F. (2009). Ordovician sponges (Porifera) and other silicifications from Baltica in Neogene and Pleistocene fluvial deposits of the Netherlands and northern Germany. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 58(1). Rushton, A.W.A. and W.E.A. Phillips (1973). A Protospongia from the Dalradian of Clare Island, Co. Mayo, Ireland. Palaeontology, Vol.16, Part 2. Ungureanu, D. and E. Barbu (2004). Endemic Features of the Upper Jurassic Sponges in the Western Central Dobrogea (Atarnati-Cechirgea Perimeter). Acta Palaeontologica Romaniae, Vol. Porifera - North America Botting, J.P. and N.J. Butterfield (2005). Reconstructing early sponge relationships by using the Burgess Shale fossil Eiffelia globosa, Walcott. PNAS, Vol.102, Number 5. Branson, C.C. (1966). Fossil Freshwater Sponges in Oklahoma. Proc. of the Okla.Acad. of Sci, Section B, Geology. King, R.H. (1932). A Pennsylvanian Sponge Fauna from Wise County, Texas. In: Contributions to Geology, 1932. University of Texas Bulletin 3201. (Note: the download includes the entire bulletin. The article on Pennsylvanian Sponges is on pages 52-62 of the pdf file. Rigby, J.K. and R.H. Mapes (2000). Some Pennsylvanian and Permian Sponges from Southwestern Oklahoma and North-Central Texas. In: Brigham Young University Geologyl Studies. Ritter, S. (ed.), Vol.45. (Thanks to DPS Ammonite for locating this one!) Rigby, J.K. and P.M. Myrow (1999). Lower Ordovician Sponges from the Manitou Formation in Central Colorado. In: Brigham Young University Geology Studies. Kowallis, B.J. (ed.), Vol.44. Rigby, J.K. and M.H. Nitecki (1968). Annotated Bibliography of Lower Paleozoic Sponges of North America. Fieldiana: Geology, Vol.18, Number 1. Rigby, J.K., R.B. Blodgett and B.B. Britt (2008). Ordovician sponges from west-central and east-central Alaska and western Yukon Territory, Canada. Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(2). Rigby, J.K., A.W. Potter and N.K. Anderson (2008). Ordovician sponges from the Montgomery Limestone, Taylorsville area, northern Sierra Nevada, California, USA. Bulletin of Geosciences, 83(3). Rigby, J.K., C.B. Linford and D.V. Lemone (1999). Sponges from the Ibexian (Ordovician) McKelligon Canyon and Victoria Hills Formations in the Southern Franklin Mountains, Texas. In: Brigham Young University Geology Studies. Kowallis, B.J. (ed.), Vol.44. (Thanks to DPS Ammonite for pointing me to this one!) Rigby, J.K., B. Senowbari-Daryan and H. Liu (1998). Sponges of the Permian Upper Capitan Limestone, Guadalupe Mountains, New Mexico and Texas. In: Brigham Young Geology Studies. B.J. Kowallis (ed.), Vol.43. (Thanks to DPS Ammonite for finding this one!) Tihansky, A.B. and K.J. Cunningham (2007). Newly Discovered Fossil Sponges Share Scientific Secrets About Miami's Ancient Marine Environment. USGS Sound Waves, Volume FY 2007, Issue 95. Whitfield, R.P. (1905). Descriptions of New Fossil Sponges from the Hamilton Group of Indiana. Bulletin American Museum of Natural History, Vol.XXI, Article XVII. Porifera - South America/Central America/Caribbean Beresi, M.S. (2007). Fossil sponges of Argentina: a review. Porifera Research: Biodiversity, Innovation and Sustainability. Beresi, M.S. (2003). Cambrian sponge spicules and Chancelloriid sclerites from the Argentine Precordillera: A review. Geologica Acta, Vol.1, Number 1. McMenamin, M.A.S. (2008). Early Cambrian sponge spicules from the Cerro Clemente and Cerro Rajon, Sonora, Mexico. Geologica Acta, Vol.6, Number 4. Pisera, A., M. Martinez and H. Santos (2006). Late Cretaceous Siliceous Sponges from El Rayo Formation, Puerto Rico. J.Paleont., 80(3). Ritterbush, K.A., et al. (2015). Andean sponges reveal long-term benthic ecosystem shifts following the end-Triassic mass extinction. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 420. General Porifera Antcliffe, J.B., R.H.T. Callow and M.D. Brasier (2014). Giving the early fossil record of sponges a squeeze. Biological Reviews, 2014. Borchiellini, C., et al. (2001). Sponge paraphyly and the origin of Metazoa. J.Evol.Biol., 14. Botting, J.P., X. Yuan and J.-P. Lin (2014). Tetraradial symmetry in early poriferans. Chin.Sci.Bull., 59(7). Botting, J.P., L.A. Muir and J.-P. Lin (2013). Relationships of the Cambrian Protomonaxonida (Porifera). Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.16, Issue 2. Carrera, M.G. and J. Maletz (2014). Ordovician sponge spicules from Spitsbergen, Nevada and Newfoundland: new evidence for hexactinellid and demosponge early diversification. Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, Vol.12, Number 8. Carrera, M.G. and J.K. Rigby (1999). Biogeography of Ordovician Sponges. J.Paleont., 73(1). Hooper, J.N.A. (2003). 'Sponguide' Guide to Sponge Collection and Identification. Queensland Museum. Hooper, J.N.A., R.W.M. van Soest and F. Debrenne (2002). Phylum Porifera Grant, 1836. In: Systema Porifera: A Guide to the Classification of Sponges. Hooper, J.N.A. and R.W.M. van Soest (eds.), Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York. Reitner, J. and D. Mehl (1995). Early Paleozoic Diversification of Sponges: New Data and Evidences. Geol.Palaont.Mitt.Innsbruck, 20. Sperling, E.A., D. Pisani and K.J. Peterson (2007). Pofireran paraphyly and its implications for Precambrian palaeobiology. In: The Rise and Fall of the Ediacaran Biota. Vickers-Rich, P. and P. Komarower (eds.), Geological Society, London. Uriz, M.-J., et al. (2003). Siliceous Spicules and Skeleton Frameworks in Sponges: Origin, Diversity, Ultrastructural Patterns and Biological Functions. Microscopy Research and Techniques, 62. Walcott, C.D. (1920). Number 6.-Middle Cambrian Spongiae. In: Cambrian Geology and Paleontology IV. Smithsonian Miscellaneous Collections, Vol.67, Number 6.
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