Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'elephant bird'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 2 results

  1. Rarity

    Is it illegal in any way to have elephant bird fossils, if not how rare are they. Are they pretty common in the public? Thanks everyone
  2. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since August 25, 2016. Infraorder Paleognathae Order Aepyornithiformes - Elephant Birds. Bibi, F., et al. (2006). New Fossil Ratite (Aves: Paleognathae) Eggshell Discoveries from the Late Miocene Baynunah Formation of the United Arab Emirates, Arabian Peninsula.Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.9, Issue 1. Bradbury, W.C. (1919). Some Notes on the Egg of Aepyornis maximus. The Condor, Vol.XXI, Number 3. Endo, H., et al. (2011). Coxa Morphologically Adapted to Large Egg in Aepyornithid Species Compared with Various Palaeognaths. Anatomia Histologia Embryologia, Blackwell Verlag GmbH. Long, J.A., et al. (1998). The Cervantes egg: an early Malgasy tourist to Australia. Records of the Western Australian Museum, 19. Mitchell, K.J., et al. (2014). Ancient DNA reveals elephant birds and kiwi are sister taxa and clarifies ratite bird evolution. Science, Vol.344, Issue 6186. Mlíkovský, J. (2003). Eggs of extinct aepyornithids (Aves: Aepyornithidae) of Madagascar: size and taxonomic identity. Sylvia, 39. Sauer, E.G.F. (1969). Taxonomic Evidence and Evolutionary Interpretation of Psammornis. Bonn zool.Beitr., 1/3. Tovondrafale, T., et al. (2014). Paleoecological analysis of elephant bird (Aepyornithidae) remains from the Late Pleistocene and Holocene formations of southern Madagascar. Malgasy Nature, 8. Order Apterygiformes - Kiwis. Cooper, A., et al. (1992). Independent origins of New Zealand moas and kiwis. Proc.Nat.Acad.Sci. USA, Vol.89. Cunningham, S., I. Castro and M. Alley (2007). A new prey-detection mechanism for kiwi (Apteryx spp.) suggests convergent evolution between paleognathous and neognathous birds. J.Anat., 211. Mitchell, K.J., et al. (2014). Ancient DNA reveals elephant birds and kiwi are sister taxa and clarifies ratite bird evolution. Science, Vol.344, Issue 6186. Worthy, T.H., et al. (2013). Miocene fossils show that kiwi (Apteryx, Apterygidae) are probably not phyletic dwarves. In: Paleornithological Research 2013: Proceed. 8th Internat. Meeting Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution. Göhlich, U.B. and A. Kroh (eds.), Verlag Naturhistorisches Museum Wien. Order Casuariiformes - Cassowaries and Emus. Boles, W.E. (2001). A new emu (Dromaiinae) from the Late Oligocene Etadunna Formation. Emu, 101. Heupink, T.H., L. Huynen and D.M. Lambert (2011). Ancient DNA Suggests Dwarf and 'Giant' Emu are Conspecific. PLoS ONE, 6(4). Miller, A.H. (1962). The History and Significance of the Fossil Casuarius lydekkeri. Records of the Australian Museum, Vol.XXV, Number 10. Patterson, C. and P.V. Rich (1987). The Fossil History of the Emus, Dromaius (Aves: Dromaiinae). Rec.S.Aust.Mus., 21(2). Rich, P.V., M. Plane and N. Schroeder (1988). A pygmy cassowary (Casuarius lydekkeri) from late Pleistocene bog deposits at Pureni, Papua, New Guinea. BMR Journal of Australian Geology & Geophysics, 10. Worthy, T.H., S.J. Hand and M. Archer (2014). Phylogenetic relationships of the Australian Oligo-Miocene ratite Emuarius gidju Casuariidae. Integrative Zoology, 2014:9. Order Dinornithiformes - Moas. Ashwell, K.W.S. and R.P. Scofield (2007). Big Birds and Their Brains: Paleoneurology of the New Zealand Moa. Brains, Behavior and Evolution, published on-line. Baker, A.J., et al. (2014). Genomic Support for a Moa-Tinamou Clade and Adaptive Morphological Convergence in Flightless Ratites. Molecular Biology and Evolution, Advance Access. Bunce, M., et al. (2009). The evolutionary history of the extinct ratite moa and New Zealand Neogene paleogeography. PNAS Early Edition. Cooper, A., et al. (1992). Independent origins of New Zealand moas and kiwis. PNAS, Vol.89. Haast, J. (1868). On the Measurements of Dinornis Bones, obtained excavations in a swamp situated at Glenmark, on the property of Messrs. Kermode and Co., up to February 15, 1868. Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand. Hector, J. (1871). On Recent Moa Remains in New Zealand. Transactions and Proceedings of the Royal Society of New Zealand, Article VI. Olson, V.A. and S.T. Turvey (2013). The evolution of sexual dimorphism in New Zealand giant moa (Dinornis) and other ratites. Proc.R.Soc. B, 280. Tennyson, A.J.D., et al. (2010). Moa's Ark: Miocene Fossils Reveal the Great Antiquity of Moa (Aves: Dinornithiformes) in Zealandia. In: Proceedings of the VII International Meeting of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution. Boles, W.E. and T.H. Worthy (eds.), Records of the Australian Museum, 62(1). Turvey, S.T. and R.N. Holdaway (2005). Postnatal Ontogeny, Population Structure, and Extinction of the Giant Moa Dinornis. Journal of Morphology, 265. Wood, J.R., et al. (2012). First coprolite evidence for the diet of Anomalopteryx didiformis, an extinct forest ratite from New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Ecology, 36(2). Order Lithornithiformes Bowerbank, J.S. (1854). XXIV. On the Remains of a gigantic bird (Lithornis emuinis) from the London Clay of Sheppey. Annals and Magazine of Natural History, 14. Grellet-Tinner, G., and G.J. dyke (2005). The eggshell of the Eocene bird Lithornis. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(4). Leonard, L., G.J. dyke, and M. Van Tuinen (2005). A New Specimen of the Fossil Palaeognath Lithornis from the Lower Eocene of Denmark. American Museum Novitates, Number 3491. Mayr. G. (2009). Toward the complete bird - the skull of the middle Eocene Messel lithornithid (Aves, Lithornithidae). Bulletin de L'Institut Royal des Sciences Naturelles de Belgique, Sciences de la Terre, 79. Nesbitt, S.J. and J.A. Clarke (2016). The Anatomy and Taxonomy of the Exquisitely Preserved Green River Formation (Early Eocene) Lithornithids (Aves) and the Relationships of Lithornithidae. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Number 406. (107.9MB download) Stidham, T.A., et al. (2014). A lithornithid (Aves: Palaeognathae) from the Paleocene (Tiffanian) of southern California. PaleoBios, 31(1). Order Struthioniformes - Ostriches. Boev, Z.N. and N. Spassov (2009). First record of ostriches (Aves, Struthioniformes, Struthionidae) from the late Miocene of Bulgaria with taxonomic and zoogeographic discussion. Geodiversitas, 31(3). Boev, Z.N., et al. (2008). First Remains of Fossil Ostriches (Aves: Struthioniformes: Struthionidae) from Bulgaria.Acta Zoologica Bulgarica, 60(1). Burchak-Abramovich, N.I. and A.K. Vekua (1990). The fossil ostrich Struthio dmanisensis sp.n. from the Lower Pleistocene of eastern Georgia. Acta Zool.Cracov., 33(7). Härlid, A., A. Janke and U. Arnason (1997). The mtDNA Sequence of the Ostrich and the Divergence Between Paleognathous and Neognathous Birds. Mol.Biol.Evol., 14(7). Harrison, T. and C.P. Msuya (2005). Fossil struthionid eggshells from Laetoli, Tanzania: Taxonomic and biostratigraphic significance. Journal of African Earth Sciences, 41. Hou, L., et al. (2005). A Miocene ostrich fossil from Gansu Province, northwest China. Chinese Science Bulletin, Vol.50, Number 16. Houde, P. and H. Haubold (1987). Palaeotis weigelti Restudied: A Small Middle Eocene Ostrich (Aves: Struthioniformes). Palaeovertebrata, 17(2). Mourer-Chauvire, C. and D. Geraads (2005). The Struthionidae and Pelagornithidae (Aves: Struthioniformes, Odontopterygiformes) from the Late Pliocene of Ahl Al Oughlam, Morocco. In: 6eme Symposium international de la Society for Avian Paleontology and Evolution. Esperaza: France. Patnaik, R., et al. (2009). Ostrich-like eggshells from a 10.1 million-yr-old Miocene ape locality, Haritalyangar, Himachal Pradesh, India. Current Science, Vol.96, Number 11. Sahni, A., et al. (1989). Ultrastructure and Taxonomy of Ostrich Eggshells from Upper Palaeolithic Sites of India. Journal of the Palaeontological Society of India, Vol.34. Senut, B. (2000). Fossil ratite eggshells: A useful tool for Cainozoic biostratigraphy in Namibia. Communs.geol.Surv. Namibia, 12. Vekua, A. (2013). Giant Ostrich in Dmanisi Fauna. Bulletin of the Georgian National Academy of Sciences, Vol.7, Number 2. Vogel, J.C., E. Visser and A. Fuls (2001). Suitability of Ostrich Eggshell for Radiocarbon Dating. Radiocarbon, Vol.43, Number 1. Order Tinamiformes - Tinamous. Baker, A.J., et al. (2014). Genomic Support for a Moa-Tinamou Clade and Adaptive Morphological Convergence in Flightless Ratites. Molecular Biology and Evolution, Advance Access. Bertelli, S. and L.M. Chiappe (2005). Earliest Tinamous (Aves: Paleognathae) from the Miocene of Argentina and Their Phylogenetic Position. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County - Contributions in Science, Number 502. Chandler, R.M. (2012). A New Species of Tinamou (Aves: Tinamiformes, Tinamidae) from the Early-Middle Miocene of Argentina. PalArch's Journal of Vertebrate Palaeontology, 9(2). Parkes, K.C. and G.A. Clark (1966). An Additional Character Linking Ratites and Tinamous, an an Interpretation of Their Monophyly. The Condor, 68. General Paleognathae Bibi, F., et al. (2006). New Fossil Ratite (Aves: Palaeognathae) Eggshell Discoveries from the Late Miocene Baynunah Formation of the United Arab Emirates, Arabian Peninsula. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.9, Issue 1. Cenizo, M.M. (2012). Review of the putative Phorusrhachidae from the Cretaceous and Paleogene of Antarctica: new records of ratites and pelagornithid birds. Polish Polar Research, Vol.33, Number 3. Dickison, M.R. (2007). The Allometry of Giant Flightless Birds. Ph.D. Dissertation - Duke University. Houde, P.W. (1988). Paleognathous Birds from the Early Tertiary of the Northern Hemisphere. Publications of the Nuttall Ornithological Club, Number 22. Houde, P.W. (1986). Ostrich ancestors found in the Northern Hemisphere suggest new hypothesis of ratite origins. Nature, Vol.234, Number 6097. Sauer, E.G.F. (1972). Ratite Eggshells and Phylogenetic Questions. Bonn.zool.Beitr., Vol.23.
×