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Found 12 results

  1. I picked up this Mariella sp. ammonite yesterday and got bitten by a 100m year old shark! I mostly think of shark teeth in North Texas as coming from the Upper Cretaceous but I found this in the Grayson Formation at the Rayzor Ranch site in Denton. I think it's the lingual surface of a lateral tooth. it may be either Cretolumna appendiculata or Cretodus crassidens. Who else has found shark teeth at this site?
  2. I found this last weekend in the Grayson Formation in Tarrant county, Texas. I have never found a Cretaceous gastropod that was so squatty. Most that I find are elongated to some degree or another, but there is no elongation to this one. This was posterior end down in the creek bed embedded in the limestone. I popped it out, but I guess part of it remained in the limestone. I tried to prep the matrix off, but I can’t tell where the matrix ends and the shell begins since it appears to be a steinkern. There is no ornamentation on it at all. It is about 36 mm at the widest whole part, but looks like it was at least 50 mm wide at one time. I can’t tell how wide the aperture or last whorl was. The total height of the gastropod is 20 mm tall. The overall shape is lenticular. I don’t think there are many lenticular gastropods in the book I have. I couldn’t find one that matched it. Top view (which is actually the posterior end of the shell) Side view Bottom view (which I believe is the anterior end of it) Any help at all would be appreciated.
  3. Waconella wacoensis question.

    I found all 3 of these in the Grayson Formation in Tarrant county. I know the smaller ones are Waconella wacoensis brachiopods. I assume the larger one is the same, but I wanted confirmation that it is also a Waconella wacoensis. I may have found one other almost the same size, but this one is more that twice the size of the other two. The brachial valve view. The pedicle valve view. I The sizes of each one in the last 2 pics left to right. 25 mm long x 20 mm wide x 16 mm thick 16.5 mm long x 16 mm wide x 10 mm thick looks like it may have been crushed in on one side so that increased the width and length some. 16 mm long x 14 mm wide x 10 mm thick Can anyone confirm or rule out that they are the same?
  4. I found this plate of oysters I don't know the name of in the Lower Cretaceous Grayson Formation exposure at Rayzor Ranch in Denton Texas. I showed it to @trempie4 in August and @Jeffrey P when he was here in September and neither one wanted it so I finally took it home myself. As I was exposing more of the oysters I first noticed these nice little serpula on and around the oysters. Then I noticed something I haven't seen before. i wonder if it could be some kind of feeding trace. Any ideas?
  5. Texas Heteromorph ID

    I went hunting in the rain yesterday. It wasn’t one of my most successful hunts, but I still managed to find some cool stuff. I found this in The Grayson Formation, Cretaceous in the Denton, TX area. I had never hunted that area of the Grayson before and it was different as every area of the Grayson seems to be. I found this section of a heteromorph. I don’t believe it is a Mariella. I am wondering if it could be a section of Turrilites. I believe it only has 2 rows of tubercles. Any thoughts? Side view Top down view Edge view
  6. Grayson Formation ID urchin spine?

    Echinoid urchin spine is a complete guess. I don’t have a clue. Does anyone know what the tan thing with bumps is? It is just over 2 cm long so far. I found it in the Cretaceous, Grayson Formation in North Texas. It has Mariella brazoensis, Waconela wacoensis, a little nautilus, way too many oysters among other things in the conglomerate with it. Could it be an urchin spine? It has tiny, basically microscopic bumps all over it too. It still needs work uncovering. I came to the oyster on top of it and will have to take another approach to removing the oyster.
  7. Ammonite ID

    I found this the last weekend of November, 2017 in Arlington Texas. It was in an area that is marked Woodbine, but Grayson formation fossils are mixed in. So, I’m not sure which it is from. It was found in a tan crumbly soft clay like soil. I sat down to try to ID it, but it seems pretty worn down. So I am not sure it is even identifiable. It is about 14 cm in diameter and has a whorl breadth of 30 mm and whorl height of 60 mm. There appear to be 2 rows of tubercles. One on the interior edge of the whorl. There are 6 tubercles in this row. The 2nd row runs down the middle of the whorl. Those in the middle are so worn down some are missing and I’m unable to determine the tubercle count, but I can count 10 tubercles within the same space of 3.5 tubercles on the inner edge. I tend to think there should be a 3rd row of tubercles on the outer edge, but if there is a third row it is worn off. This was taken at an angle so you could see the tubercles better. They’re very faint bumps. The tubercles in the center are most noticible, but still pretty worn. If anyone can point me in the right direction on ID I’d appreciate it. @BobWill and @Uncle Siphuncle and @bone2stone
  8. Graysonites ammonite?

    I found this back around Thanksgiving, the end of November, in the Grayson Formation in Tarrant County Texas. I believe it is a Graysonites ammonite, but I was trying to narrow it down to a species. I only have one reference book for Texas ammonites and it doesn’t mention any Graysonites ammonites in Tarrant County. The book is a bit older so some of the nomenclature may have changed too. In the book there are 4 species compared in a table. There are a few more mentioned briefly, but not well described. Only 2 species in the table are reported in the Grayson formation, lozoi and wooldridgei I think this may be the Graysonites lozoi species unless anyone can direct me otherwise. It is 200 mm in diameter and had a max whorl height of 76 mm with a breadth of 49 mm. The number of ribs per whorl is 16. I was hunting with another person the day I found this. He found a much larger one in embedded under the marl ledge about 30 feet from this one. He tried to extract it and shattered it in the attempt. The horns on that one were about 45 mm long! It was an impressive little beast. Any thoughts? Can anyone direct me to additional references with Graysonites in Texas? I probably need to search @Fruitbat‘s PDF library. Or maybe @doushantuo has a good reference. I have others I will be attempting to ID soon as well. The last shot you can just see suture patterns if you zoom in. Hopefully the quality didn’t suffer too much when I attempted to downsize them to put on here.
  9. TFF member MB has coauthored another excellent paper on a spectacular crab from the Grayson Formation in Waco, Texas. This exciting discovery represents one of only a few times a fossil crab with composite eyes is preserved and probably the first occurrence of three-dimensional crab eyes in the fossil record. Congrats Àlex!! Vega, F.J., Jackson, J., & Ossó, À (2014) Exceptional preservation of a late Cenomanian (Late Cretaceous) crab from Texas, U.S.A. Boletín de la Sociedad Geológica Mexicana 66(1):215-221 OPEN ACCESS PDF
  10. Not Quite Sure Here Two Shots

    Not quite sure what this one is, found North of Dallas in what I beleive is the Grayson Formation from the Cretaceous period. Any help on this one fellow fossil hunters?
  11. I had a chance to visit my hillside again today. Apparently Dan and Ms. Brett didn't get everything while we were there Sunday and left me some. Dan was able to identify it as definitely Grayson Formation, so now I know for sure. Thanks Dan. I found the normal variety of shark teeth, fish verts, a few echies, and another ryncholite. And sometimes it just seems that the fossils come in pairs: In the famous words of one of our members... Good Times!
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