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Found 7 results

  1. Hello, I have many crinoid columnals that I collected in gravel (I suppose it was river/creek gravel collected and sold by a "sand and gravel" company) in Illinois many years ago. I have two questions that may be obvious to more seasoned fossil hunters/students. 1) Exactly how did the crinoids actually grow, meaning, how did the stems' diameter expand horizontally in size as time went on, since the stems were mostly composed of hard calcium carbonate/lime. In other words, it seems that once they are "hardened" or "frozen" into a certain size, how can they get bigger? Was there growth tissue on the OUTSIDE of the stem that kept adding on calcium to the inside, like tree trunks creating wood and bark? (I can understand the growth of whorled type seashells, but I can't get this through my head.) 2) Many of the columnal discs/segments I have found are virtually solid silica, some with a glossy almost pearly luster, I suppose would be classified as flint, chert or chalcedony. I assume from what I've read that this is from replacement of the original calcium with silica over a long period of time. This may seem simple-minded or thinking too deeply, but do researchers claim to understand how the silica could actually have "moved" or migrated into the spaces where the calcium used to be? I can't visualize how this would be possible. Like, one molecule at a time gradually moves through solid rock? Does anyone understand why this seems so hard for me to visualize? Or is this believed to occur because the original calcium actually changes it's molecular characteristics without moving? Any input or comments would be greatly appreciated!
  2. Disease or wound growth?

    I dug this bone up and it has obvious bone growth beyond the ordinary. It does look as if there is a chunk missing which may have been a bite mark, perhaps during a mating fight or the like since it does not appear to be from a shark bite. Mid. Miocene, Temblor Formation, Bakersfield, California What do you suppose is the cause? This shows a bite out of the bone, but isn't consistent with a shark bite pattern.
  3. Fragments

    Any thoughts?
  4. Oyster oddity

    I would love to know what's in this oyster shell? Black pearl?
  5. Daspletosaurus horneri Ontogeny

    Howdy folks! I found the following article on Dr. Thomas Carr's twitter feed this afternoon. It gives a little more insight into the growth stages of the newly described Daspletosaurus. Why do I follow a bunch of paleontologists on twitter? Well, because dentistry is sometimes boring, but paleontology never is! Enjoy! On on a side note, he is working on the "Jane" monograph, so stay tuned! http://tyrannosauroideacentral.blogspot.com/2017/04/introducing-daspletosaurus-horneri-two_3.html?m=1
  6. lamp shell formation

    a classic http://rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royptb/264/865/439.full.pdf nb.:LARGE FILE!!!!! AW knew brachs inside and out,and you can take that literally link expires nov.6th
  7. Growth and Form

    Found the probably most significant biology text of the previous century. hefty,scholarly.much,much cited NB long/big download* This is one of the first theoretical texts on the geometry and kinematics of growth,according to some still one of the finest https://archive.org/details/ongrowthform00thom *73Mb
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