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Found 32 results

  1. STH fire zone hemi’s

    Hey, I was wondering if it’s possible to find fire zone hemi’s in STH, or not? TIA
  2. I had Friday off and decided to head out to Matoaka Beach to do some shark tooth hunting along the Calvert Cliffs. I arrived bright and early and soon came across a decent-sized Hemi. Unfortunately, it was incomplete: missing one side of the root, some serrations, and part of the blade. That turned out to be the theme of the morning as I continued to find several other partial Hemis on the beach. When I finally found a complete tooth, it was in the 0.5- to 0.75-inch range, which is typically the size I find here. While I’ve found several tantalizing bits of larger Hemis at Matoaka, the largest complete tooth was under an inch. Still, finding even smaller and broken teeth is fun, and I had the beach mostly to myself with favorable tides. So, I kept going. And then, in a few inches of water, I saw what looked like a tooth. I definitely haven’t mastered the art of spotting submerged shark teeth. I’m used to my underwater “finds” being shells, rocks, leaves, twigs, and chunks of clay. But I reached down anyway. And I pulled up what is by far the largest Hemi I’ve found to date, measuring 1.28 inches along the slant and 1.22 inches wide—a complete and beautiful tooth! After a long day of fossil hunting, I had a few other nice finds too, but the Hemi was my trip maker. On my way out, I found one last broken tooth, which would have been a real monster, possibly in the 1.5-inch range. Maybe next time, I’ll find one of those intact too!
  3. Hemipristis serra 07

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North-Central Florida Hawthorne formation Miocene

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  4. Hemipristis serra (3)

    From the album Sharks

  5. Hemipristis serra (2)

    From the album Sharks

    A large h. serra tooth from SC.
  6. Hemipristis serra (1)

    From the album Sharks

    A large h. serra tooth from SC.
  7. Hemipristis serra 09

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra Savannah, Georgia

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  8. Hemipristis serra 08

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra Savannah, Georgia

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  9. Summerville May 12 2017

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  10. Summerville June 23 2017

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    Hemipristis serra Galeocerdo aduncus Physogaleus contortus Sphyrna sp.

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  11. Summerville December 01 2017

    From the album Summerville, SC Fossil Hunts

    Hemipristis serra lodged in Ashley formation marl

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  12. Hemipristis serra 06

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra Summerville, SC Chandler Bridge fm.

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  13. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Tooth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  14. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Tooth SITE LOCATION: Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  15. The Fall Creek Crawl

    Hello everyone, since school has let go I've had an opportunity to get back in the water and do some quiet and relaxing hunting. The leaves are falling in the bucket fulls so that does tend to clog things up a bit at this time of year, but the weather has been warmer than usual and the spouse gods have been in my favor. I've had a time documenting some of the more interesting finds. I usually give the haul a good single flatbed scan to archive everything by date and then concentrate on anything interesting. Some color about, which means they haven't been sitting on the creek-bed for too long. A 'dolphin' tooth that isn't completely eaten up .. etc ... I have to say my sailing boots though have made up from their disuse since my time in California (*sigh*). It seems that the extra rubber and neoprene work well in the muck and mud, and keep my digits safe from the broken glass. They are warm on my feet too which is usually the first thing to go .... The Angustidens are always my favorite .. Most are in pieces but when you pick up one with some color or a good tip the curses about the missing cusp fade away. Small teeth with big color .. Billfish hypural from the Chandler bridge and the Ashley fm. Marl (in matrix) . I find rostrum fragments occasionally. Fish jaw part The best and least common are the teeth locked in the matrix. Most likely Ashley fm. below the Chandler bridge. The Aliopias sp. in this location are always small. Maybe the water at this spot wasn't deep enough back in the day .. Vert and tooth ... this tooth is probably my best from the creek. They can take a beating. Cheers, Brett
  16. Hemipristis serra 05

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North Central, Florida Occasionally there are discussions on the forum about a fossil's intrinsic value to science ..... but I know quite a few of us if not all of us are attracted to some of these tiny time capsules as forms of art, nature's pattern. Persisting beyond their biological task and evolving again for us as a thing of visual fascination and beauty.

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  17. Hemipristis serra 04

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North-Central Florida Hawthorne formation Miocene

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  18. 5 inch Meg in the summer ... finally

    Whoo Boy .. what a Friday ! I decided that this was the day I was gonna pull a Meg out of the water. I even called it with my wife present, and she gave me the same rolled eyes to the ceiling look .. haha. I had dropped in two weeks prior and pulled out 3 fraglodons in the 2-3in range in the same spot so I suspected that there were other large chunks to be had if not a whole tooth. These teeth are from a re-worked layer so in the stream they can take a further beating. On the whole the rains have been pretty steady on and off the past few weeks and the water was murky unfortunately. Making it hard to know where I was searching. The humidity was at a wonderful 98% so I was sweating like a yeti in July but thankfully the mosquitoes were absent. The teeth at this spot were not as small, or well preserved for the most part. A few small verts, mako teeth, more fish teeth than I've ever found, a really worn toothed whale, and about a dozen fragmented angustiden teeth. At this spot I was able to score my most complete angy to date in the water. The cusps intact are rare in the stream bed, I've seen them often pristine but these usually are from diggers that attack the banks or land sites. The meg wasn't deep and I flipped it up off the bottom using a sand flea rake of all things .. must've stepped on it a few times before I found it. I hardly ever use that rake. 5 inches on the slant. It's taken over a year so there was nothing easy about it, just happened to get lucky and read the signs. Cheers, Brett a few of the other finds.
  19. HemiPristisSerraSbyS.jpg

    From the album Peace River Fossils (2016-2017)

    A 1.6 inch upper jaw Snaggletooth shark tooth. Note the bite marks likely made when the tooth was lost during feeding.
  20. My brother and I found this fossil shark tooth in the gravel beds along Firesteel Creek near Mitchell, SD. We have gone several times and found many shark teeth but to my knowledge, this is the first Hemipristis serra that we found. I believe this tooth has been worked by Native Americans. There is a perfectly circular hole in the root - or it would be circular if part of the tooth weren't broken away. I have read that worked fossil shark teeth from the Chesapeake Bay, including Hemipristis serra, have been found in burial mounds as far away as Ohio. My questions are: do you agree that this tooth has probably been modified by prehistoric people? How widely distributed is Hemipristis in North America? Is it likely to have been found and worked on site or might it have been traded from the east coast?
  21. Hemipristis serra 03

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North-Central Florida Hawthorne formation Miocene

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  22. Hemipristis serra 01

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North-Central Florida Hawthorne formation Miocene

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

  23. Hemipristis serra 02

    From the album Sharks and their prey ....

    Hemipristis serra North-Central Florida Hawthorne formation Miocene

    © Matthew Brett Rutland

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