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Found 12 results

  1. Anyone know what this is?

    Found this is Pennsylvania, I think it's a wasp nest or honeycomb but not sure.
  2. Honeycomb Fossil ID

    Not exactly sure what this is (not a paleontologist- or even a collector as my username suggests). I was wondering if it was coral or fossilized honeycomb or something entirely different. Any help would be appreciated.
  3. Found in creek

    Found in creek near joplin mo. Sorry my pic does no justice. Technology new to me. Can help identify? Thank you all.
  4. Possible coral

    Im thinking this is coral. Appears to have a honeycomb like design happening. No idea where it originated from. It was given to me with a couple other pieces as a gift. I can do other pics of other angles if needed.
  5. Bone or Fossil

    Hi, everyone! Got a strange one for you and would appreciate any helpful advice! Found in a cave in Scotland. Would have normally considered it a cranial fragment due to the rough texture on the flat side, but the strange, raised honeycomb/chain pattern on the other side is throwing me off. Not necessarily versed in fossils so figured this would be the place to go just to check for that. Photo is a bit misleading, btw - it’s a dark brown colour. Sorry for the lack of photo scale, used a 1p coin which was all I had on me.
  6. Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Trying to learn, but am confused. I tentatively identified the below specimen as a Honeycomb coral, based on info from the below and input from local “experts”. None are Paleontologists, but one is a Natural History Museum Director. Begin quote: Favositid tabulates: Honeycomb corals The favositid corals are quite common. They usually formed large colonies. The corallite is prismatic in shape, resembling honeycombs. Favositids have mural pores, tiny holes in the wall of the skeleton, which connect different corallites. These pores are distributed in characteristic patterns and numbers, which are useful for distinguishing the various types of favositids. Favositids lived from the Ordovician to the Permian, at which time they became extinct. They are most abundant in middle Silurian to lower Devonian rock. Favosites is the most common fossil coral in Wisconsin. https://wgnhs.uwex.edu/wisconsin-geology/fossils-of-wisconsin/coral-gallery/corals/ Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, UW Extension The confusing part is that some surfaces of this specimen show no pattern or regular form. Just like most of my finds. Are there any clues to indicate a rock of this structure may be a coral? Other than cutting it open? I have about 50 like this, but only two others show the typical pattern. The rest just have the “circles” on all sides. All are basically the same composition of material, but colors vary. All have inclusions of crystals. My vision is limited, so I only know what I have found after I wash it and look under a lighted magnifier with a loop. Photographing helps a lot as well. I just go on shape and colors when picking up. Then use a small hand held magnifying glass to examine. Sometimes wash off with a little water first. My son in law, who has (almost) a geology minor from local University, is amazed at what the glaciers “dumped” on my land. Note that a large part of the classes were related to local fossils, due to the abundance of them. Please let me know if my ID is correct, and any pointers for identifying specimens which do not show the structure, only the “circles” or “cavities”. Thank you. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  7. A few years ago, I found a fossilized something on the Beach at Cape Henlopen. It was embedded in quartz. It looked kinda like a belemnite, but the wrong material. I was told by Plax that it was much older than our cretaceous belemnites. I tucked it into a spot on the shelf and wondered about it. Since then I have seen a few posts here and there from folks in NJ finding nice little paleozoic pieces on their side of the bay as well. This summer, I made it a mission to explore the Delaware beaches and see what I could find and how far north they went. I began at the cape and worked my way north, one beach to a trip. Cape Henlopen's beach is rather lacking in pebbles this season, so not much to find, but I know they turn up! I have spotted them here and there in the intervening years. The next few trips were Bowers Beach. Oh, yeah! Some are impressions of brachiopods and crinoids are so tiny in big pebbles that is just isn't worth it to take them home and wonder where on that pitted rock I found something recognizable. Others are very distinct chunks of coral replaced with chert, some with crystal quartz in the gaps between structural elements. Each time, I came home with a couple of fistfuls of nice little pieces, mostly about 1" across. The next stop was the beach in Battery Park, in New Castle. This is not a nice bathing beach. It is on a heavily-industrialized section of the Delaware River. The beach is littered with slag, brick, glass and bits of other man-made "rock." But, the black slag definitely allows the brown chert to stand out more. Bingo! The prettiest horn coral I've found yet, plus a few other nice goodies. All told, I came home with about as much as I usually find at Bowers, but cutting my travel time from over an hour to just 20 minutes. *Insert Happy Dance Here!* The last stop was a rare little stretch of river bank in Claymont, a mile or so from the northern border. The stretch was pretty narrow and short. There were plenty of pebbles, but not much chert. Nothing distinctly fossilized. Oh, yeah, and on the way BACK, I found, facing into the woods and hidden by the vegetation, a "No Trespassing" sign. Now they tell me. Ah, well, now I know it isn't worth the trouble anyway. The Delaware Geological Survey, as far as I can find, has no public record of fossils at the beach. They note the Cretaceous at the C&D Canal, the Miocene in a farm field that got bulldozed for a highway, Pleistocene silicified wood in the fields and streams just south of the canal, and plant impressions from the canal down to the southern border. The corals and other marine impressions in the chert are Paleozoic, possibly Devonian or Silurian, but no one seems quite sure. They were part of the ancient sea bed when the Cretaceous stuff at the canal was still alive and can be found in the pebbles there, too, occasionally. I find it really neat and kind of surreal to think about all those fossils that were ancient when my ancient sea shells were still alive.
  8. Honeycomb?

    This fossil looks like a honeycomb. I doubt its coral, if you look closely the holes are almost all perfect hexagons. It was found in northern Michigan (lower peninsula) What could this be?
  9. Fossilized honeycomb?

    Hello! My kids found this today in our church parking lot. It looks just like honeycomb and the stone it is in is very sparkly. Could it be fossilized honeycomb?
  10. Hi all, I recently acquired a very nice turtle fossil (Anosteira maomingensis) from a local shop. Upon closely examining this fossil, I realized it has more to it than meets the eye, and I highlighted several spots that I would like verification on from you guys. Are those what I think it is? Two possible bite marks, a honeycomb structure under its shell, and its possible skull or bone material? More close-up pictures below.
  11. Skin Impression?

    This is front and back of the fossil found in louisiana although may not have came from there was found in some gravel! Looks like snakeskin or honeycomb maybe?
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