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Found 147 results

  1. Here are some finds from a late August to early September long loop road trip, fossil hunting through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Kentucky. I'll appreciate detailed specimen identification help. First photo shows brachiopods & a trilobite from the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, northwestern Ohio.
  2. Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State Road 101 to Garr Hill, to collect in the Upper Ordovician Liberty Formation. It was my first time at the site and everything I found was collected from loose rocks at or near the base of the outcrop. A couple of pictures:
  3. Im new and need a bunch of help

    Im new have found abunch of bone. Not shur what turns dynos to gems but i have teeth skin and whole specimens in sap i think. I need alot of help
  4. The Day of The Echinoderm

    Firstly, a big THANK YOU to @Jeffrey P for hanging out with me for the day! What a knowledgeable, generous, and all around swell guy! If you ever get the opportunity to hunt with Jeff, I highly encourage you to. Jeff and I met at around 8:30 am, and after a quick transfer of his gear to my truck, we were off. We first drove about 45 minutes south to the small town of Wax, to hunt the Upper Mississippian. Specifically to look for blastoids and crinoid calyxes that were known to be found in the area. As it happens, luck was with us! Unfortunately, I didn't take the field pictures that I typically do. Due to the fact that I went swimming with my phone a month or so ago . I am down to using my wife's old phone that I found in the junk drawer (Yes Jeff, it's pink... ). I didn't take it out much to avoid the inevitable drop down the hill side. Especially since it doesn't even have a protective case... Jeff snapped a few pictures. Maybe he will chime in and add them when he is able. For the first few minutes we didn't find much besides crinoid stems, bryozoans, and the deflated or crushed brachiopods common to the site. The main species of brach found in the area doesn't seem to have fared well during the fossilization process. Finding a nice inflated one is a rarity. After a few minutes of adjusting our eyes to spot the small finds located here, we started to pick out the blastoids. Jeff was the first to find one, and gifted it to me as he had already collected a few on his previous trips here. Thanks Jeff for gifting me my first blastoid! Most of the blastoids, while small, were whole and nicely preserved. Here are a few examples. I did happen to find the largest blastoid from the site, and one of the larger ones Jeff had seen from here. Super pumped about this one! Crinoid calyx were also to be found here. We only found a few, but being that these were also a first for me, I was extremely excited to find them! The brachiopods I previously mentioned were abundant, and besides crinoid stems, were the most abundant fossil to be found here. Again, they are almost always deflated. Finding a nice inflated one would be a real treat. These other little Spirifer(?) brachiopods could also be found. Although they were more uncommon that the previous ones. They are very small and delicate. Often crumbling when trying to pick them up. Bivalves could be found here also, but were extremely rare. Jeff was excited to find a couple, but I struck out. Other things that could be found were crinoid stems, the odd solitary rugose coral, and of course the ever present bryozoans. We then headed to a site a few miles down the road in Leitchfield. Stay tuned!
  5. Hello! in the early 2000's, the Ring Road project in Hardin, County (Elizabethtown, KY) had been in progress. My father had a coworker friend who lived along the road and was able to obtain a few loads of the rock busted by contractors to be used in his yard. My dad scored some as well and it was used for landscaping. Ever the budding Geologist, I of course explored the rock pile and found this particular find to be both intriguing and perplexing. I've attempted to positively ID it for years. I've shown it to a shark expert, local geologists and the KY Geological Survey...none have a clue. Though they offered to buy it for a museum haha. They did say they think a fish or shark is most likely probability. Although I was looking forward to identifying it myself, I've wasted quite a bit of time attempting to do so and would like some assistance confirming the identification theories I have. Thank you! State: Kentucky | County: Hardin | City: Elizabethtown Strata: Since I'm uncertain the exact location, I used the Rockd app to determine the strata in the area. Results are: Ste. Genevieve Limestone, St. Louis Limestone, Salem Limestone. All late Mississippian.
  6. Fossil ID

    I found what I assume to be a fossil or trace fossil, but I have no idea what it is. Found this on a bed of other rocks on the bank of a creek in south-central Kentucky. I'm sorry the measurements are in imperial, I could not find a metric ruler.
  7. Hypostome?

    First of all, is this a hypostome? If so, is it a damaged one from Isotelus? Found in the Kope Formation, Ordovician along AA Highway in Kentucky. Thanks for looking at it and giving an opinion. Mike
  8. Hello! I found this crinoid in Hardin County, KY earlier this morning that I would love to be able to ID further beyond "crinoid" haha. I found it as is (no prepwork or cleaning) in a scree pile of misc Mississippian rocks and so not sure if specifically from Salem limestone, Harrodsburg limestone, Borden formation, St Louis limestone, etc. I've included pics of the front and back of the rock/crinoid. If it helps with ID'ing, the darker portions of the rock seem to be that tar-type limestone (and not surface dirt or soil, etc). In reading the published literature on KY crinoids there seems to be quite a few genera identified from this era and this part of KY and so I would also like to learn from you on how one might narrow down a crinoid's genus. Would also be iinterested in hearing your opinions on if it would help having it prepped out a bit by someone. Thanks in advance for any assistance you could provide!
  9. Hello, FFers: I'm wondering if anyone can tell me anything about these filamental fossils from the U. Ord of Kenton County, Kentucky. Given the structure under the mike, I'm guessing bryozoan, but I'd never seen anything quite like this before. Can anyone tell me more? Including, maybe, an ID? (Or a different direction, if I'm wrong about their being bryozoa.) The scale in the first pic is in mm. Thanks!
  10. Hi! I am from southeastern Kentucky. I am a newbie who is looking to explore and get new knowledge and experiences. My collection has so far been mainly bought fossils and a few tiny different shells and shell impressions that I have found randomly and in gravel. Are there any other Kentuckians that can point me in the right direction to areas where I can find anything? Hopefully these areas would be in lower eastern Kentucky as do not have ability to travel far right now due to world happenings. Thank you in advance for any tips!
  11. A Mood Lifting Hunt

    I was able to get some much needed "me time" yesterday. With all the worries of the world I have been in a foul mood lately, but I am happy to report that my mood has brightened significantly. . There is nothing like crawling around on a road cut, and hunting fossils, to really lift one's spirits! I spent a couple of hours at an upper Ordovician road cut that has been on my list to check out. It is an exposure of the Grant Lake Limestone. Shortly after I arrived, I realized that I was in for a real treat! This particular exposure is more fossil than limestone. Brachiopods are everywhere! Vinlandostrophia dominate the exposure; with Hebertella coming in a close second. Other brachs are also found, but less abundant. Orthoconic nautiloid fragments are frequently found and bryozoan encrusting is a common sight. I also found a few gastropods, and one trilobite piece that I am excited about. Unfortunately I did not take pictures in the field. It was a conscious decision. I just wanted to enjoy my time, relax, and focus on the hunt. I'll get some next time as I will definitely be going back. I did take a few pics of my better finds at home. Enjoy! First up are the Brachiopods. I found some nice whole Vinlandostrophia, and Hebertella, and what I think is Rafinesquina ( @Tidgy's Dad ) . I also took home a few single valves for study of the internal structure. I think with a little bit of clean up these will look great! I was happy to find some orthoconic nautiloids. They have been sorely lacking in my collection. I will have to research what species are found in this formation to come up with an ID. I have a few ideas, but need to confirm. Here are a few gastropods and bryozoans. I can't resist the alluring whirls of a gastropod. They seem to be uncommon in the areas that I hunt so I grab them whenever I see them. I believe these are new species of bryozoa that I will be adding to my collection. Which is exciting! Here is a tril-o-bit that I found. I'm very happy with it. Typical trilobite fragments from this area are not usually identifiable. Except to say they are possible trilobite pieces. This is a cephalic doublure of an Isotelus. Thanks to @piranha for help with the ID. All in all it was a great time. I got to relax a bit, forget my troubles, and brighten my mood. I also added some nice pieces to my collection. It was a good day!
  12. Trilobite Genal Spine?

    I was able to get out and hunt a new Ordovician spot today. A full trip report is coming, but I’m too curious about this one to wait. In the field I grabbed this thinking it was a large trilobite genal spine. After getting it home and doing some quick cleaning and research, I am less convinced. I’m not even sure that any trilobite from this time period/formation would have spines this size (still researching). From a quick glance at a Kentucky Geological Map it looks like I was in the Grant Lake Limestone (Upper Ordovician). I’m probably way off base here. Trilobites (and bits) are barely in my wheelhouse. What do you all think? I have outlined the general shape of the whole specimen in the below photo as it is obscured by overlying matrix, and a brach, towards the wider end. It has striations running the length and is flat for the most part, but the inside of the “spine” appears to be more rounded.
  13. I recently acquired some fossils that were said to have been from the Breathitt Formation of Leslie County, Kentucky. The majority of the specimens were smaller slabs of rock with fern/horsetail fossils (Neuropteris, Sphenopteris, Macroneruopteris, Alethopteris and Calamites). However, two of the specimens that i received were quite large and I am struggling to come up with an identification for them. Specimen #1 - The rounded fossil measures 27.5 cm (10.8 inches) wide and is 7 cm (2.8 inches) at its thickest point. (second specimen will be in second post due to photo size restrictions)
  14. Nautiloid ID

    Hello all, I found this nautiloid fragment in the Kope Formation out of the Cincinnatian series in Northern Kentucky. Suspecting this to either be an Endocerid due to the size or perhaps even a coiled nauitoid due to the curvature in the camerae towards the end with the siphuncle sticking out and the general shape of the specimen, unfortunately not preserving detail towards the other end. I was thinking it could be Characteroceras due to them being found in the Kope, but it seems to be too big. Seems like this guy died, sank to the bottom and preserved the side that planted in the Ordovician mud, interesting that you can still see the outline of the siphuncle on that end. Curious as to what you all think, I just don't know what to put it in as for my database. Thanks you all!
  15. Lonely Bivalve Steinkern

    I know this is a long shot, but does anyone have any idea what this bivalve steinkern may be? It was found in the Upper Ordovician (drakes formation) of Kentucky. Brachiopods are overly abundant in many of the areas that I hunt, but bivalves seem to be scarce, or I am too used to seeing brachs to pick out the bivalves. Anyway, this is the one and only bivalve that I have found, besides a few possible fragments. I know it can be near impossible to identify any steinkern, but does the shape, size, or provenance give anyone an idea as to what this may be? It just looks so lonely on my shelf; I feel like if at least needs a name. EDIT: I should note that I have looked in the literature that I have (which is limited on bivalves) and can not find anything that I am confident in to use as an ID. My internet searching has not come up with a good ID either. If I can provide better pictures or different angles don’t hesitate to ask!
  16. Need Help Identifying Fossil

    Currently located in Fleming co. Kentucky. This area is known for its large limestone deposits and is very fossil-rich. I found this piece while walking along a small creek. I have been searching this creek for roughly 4 months and have found large quantities of Horn, stem/branch and brain coral with scattered amounts of cephalopods. This is the first time I have come across a piece like this in this creek and needed help identifying it as my other resources have turned up empty. The whole rock is 10cm/4 but the fossil is 5cm /2.25 inches. Any thoughts, comments, and ideas would be much appreciated.
  17. First of many

    This is one of many fossils I have that range from marine fossils of ordovician or silurian to plant fossils in paleolithic era. Some are likely common to those with much experience, but a few Ive not been able to see even one near the same. Any help or even a point to the right path is greatly appreciated. PS, these arent enough I know but Im limited by size & technical skill apparently.
  18. A Longer and Muddier Stop

    I took a much needed break this morning and went fossil hunting for a couple of hours. I decided that I wanted to go back to the same water eroded hill that I made a quick stop at the other day. It rained last night, so the place was a muddy mess, but I had a good time and it took my mind off of things. It's supposed to rain here for the next 2-3 days. Can't wait to see what else is revealed afterwards. I'll stop in again. Preferably after it dries out for a couple of days. Here are pictures of the hillside that I have been working. The red clay is littered with rocks and fossils that have been weathered and washed out of the hill by runoff. Fragments of the rugose coral Acrocyathus floriformis litter the ground. Thanks to @Jeffrey P for help with the ID! Unless you look 5 feet one way or the other... The next picture was taken 5 feet away from the spot in the above pic. It seems that the fossils were very localized. I made multiple stops at different hills like this in the same area. I found 1 other that had a good amount of fossils in a small section. Most were fossil barren, or had very few. Still, there was plenty to keep me entertained. When I took a gander past the coral fragments, I was able to find a few more gastropods. The biggest thing I had to watch out for was my own pareidolia. The geology of the area can really trick you if you are not careful. There are also more modern evidence of creatures, and some areas where fill rock has been brought in; presumably to help with erosion. Below are a few things I had to look out for... Here are a bunch of eroded limestone fragments mixed in with coral fragments. They can definitely trick the eyes at first glance. Coral/Bryozoan fragments, or water eroded and shaped limestone? Unfortunately, limestone. At first glance I thought I was seeing the internal structure of a coral colony. Maybe a tabulate coral? Nope. Another look alike. A modern gastropod. Once I got home I cleaned the mud off with water and a soft brush. Not a bad haul for a few hours. I took quite a few pieces of coral. Some I will give to my son, some will go in my collection, and maybe, just maybe, some will end up in an auction lot to support the forum (once all this virus stuff blows over). I'm actually sorting through my collection and will hopefully have more to add to the auction pile, but that's a discussion for a different thread. Towards the end of the hunt I was on the lookout for anything branching, or that resembled a coral colony. I was hoping to find a relatively complete coral head, but alas luck was not with me. I was still able to find some nice pieces though. Here are some of the better ones with multiple coralites. A few gastropod steinkerns. This one I really liked. It's a little over a centimeter in height, and still stuck in the matrix. And last, but not least... I always pick up a few geological pieces that catch my eye. My twin is more of a rock hound so I always let him take a look. If he doesn't want them. The "cool rocks" go to my son. If all that fails, I have a "cool rock shelf" that gets the left overs. That's it for now. I had an enjoyable time today that gave me a much needed break from all the happenings in the world. It was nice to dig in the mud and forget my troubles for a few hours.
  19. A Quick Stop

    With all of the recent field trip reports being posted I have been that I haven't been able to get out there yet myself. The weather has been warmer than usual, but it’s also been rainy. Today I had very little time, but on my way home from giving my father-in-law a helping hand, I was able to make a quick stop at a local Mississippian site that is 5 minutes from my house. I believe it is St. Louis Limestone, but need to verify. I was only at the site for 20 minutes or so, but I picked up a handful of things. I didn’t get any pictures from the field as I was in a rush, but a few of the finds are below. I’ve known about this spot for a while, but it’s the first time I have stopped there. I think that’s because when I get a chance to go hunting I want to go to a place that it a little farther away since I have the extra time. I have been telling myself “It’s close. I can stop there any time...” I finally took the time, albeit a short amount, and I’m glad I did. The site is a low road cut. Well... it’s more of a water eroded slope on the side of the road than an actual cut. Little bed rock is exposed, except fragments mixed in with the soil from erosion. The dirt in the area is locally called red clay. With the recent rains, it was very muddy and the red clay tends to stain whatever it touches. You can see a reddish orange hue to the fossils. This was after a cleaning with water and a brush. I haven’t had a chance to try and ID these yet, so if anyone has any suggestions feel free to throw them out there! The area is littered with pieces of this rugose coral. This picture of a calice is a little more out of focus than I realized, but you get the idea... EDIT: Swapped the out of focus picture with one that is a little less fuzzy. This rock is full of these little gastropods. They are only about 1cm in height. I also found this gastropod and brachiopod. A close up of the gastropod. I like it. Hopefully this quick stop will hold me over until I can get out there for a long relaxing hunt.
  20. How’s everyone doing this evening! I had to replace my water main and after having it excavated I realized I might be on a goldmine of fossils, I’m new to this for the most part and trying to figure it all out. I believe I may even have some truly amazing. I believe a lot is coral, along with possible walnuts or something, and maybe some other beautiful fossils. I wanna get everyone’s opinion before I worry about that other thing so I don’t sound/look like a complete dummy. Also found several geodes and some agated coral geodes I believe. Thank you! these aren’t even close to a small portion of what I’ve pulled..
  21. Mystery siderite nodules set 2a-2d

    Each nodule is about 6 inches/15 cm in greatest dimension. Please help me identify possible fossils inside. Collected on KAS 2019 field trip near Berea, Kentucky. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siderite
  22. I though maybe the invert folks would get a kick out of these two limestone slabs. I picked them up several years ago when driving home from Kentucky along the AA highway. I cleaned them up a bit, but with the soda rig that @Gizmo loaned me. I don't really know what the critters are, but they look neat.
  23. Monday morning was dreary here in Central Kentucky. The sky was cloudy grey, and the rain was sputtering off and on. I didn't let that dampen my spirits though. I had planned to go fossil hunting and nothing was going to ruin my day! I grabbed my hunting gear, a cup of coffee, dropped my daughter off at daycare, and headed out. I arrived at the Upper Ordovician (Drakes Formation) spot that I had found this year. The last time I visited this place I didn't have time to really enjoy myself. It was more of a smash and grab. A rush to see if anything was actually there and to grab what I could. This time I was determined to spend more time at my new found hunting grounds. Not even a little wind and rain would stop me. After about a 45 minute drive I arrived at the road cut. The last time I visited, I looked through the scree at the base of the cut and found items that, over time, had washed down from the rain. Many of these pieces didn't fair well with the 5-6 meter drop. After a few minutes of looking at the strata of the cut, I determined that the most fossiliferous layers were at the top 2 meters or so. I decided that I needed to check out the top instead of the bottom. I'm glad I did! After a short walk and hike up the gentlest slope I could find, I made it to the top. This is what I found. A loose layer of dirt (well mud since it was raining...) with coral heads and fragments everywhere! All different shapes and sizes. whole specimens just a few cm across to ones that where half a meter or more.
  24. This is an old article from August of 2018 regarding fossils found in the Louisville and surrounding areas. Not anything new, but I thought it was an interesting read from a newbies perspective. It could be informative for new fossil enthusiast in Louisville/Kentucky. https://www.louisville.com/content/fossils-under-our-feet
  25. Hi! I'm very new to fossil finding and lucked across some fossil-filled rocks in central Kentucky a few weeks ago. I found these rocks in the median of I-75 in Kentucky, just before exit 87 (south of Richmond KY), where they had eroded off a sheer rock face that had been blasted out decades ago to make way for the expressway. I'm not sure what kind of rock the shells are encased in, and the only tools i have at my disposal are not particularly well suited for the job (a generic 5/8" masonry chisel, a nail hammer, and a dremel with various carbide cutting bits). I'm working on getting some tools eventually, but for now that's what I'm working with. Any tips or suggestions about how to get these shells out of this stone with what I currently have? Is it just going to be impossible without better tools, and if so, which tools would you recommend for this job? I'm attaching a picture of the rock and shells in question, with letters A, B, and C above the shells i've noticed encased in here. I'm thinking A and B may have some promise, and maybe C too? I have no idea what I'm doing here so I'm open for any insights or suggestions
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