Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'lower'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 19 results

  1. I can’t figure out if these are 2 associated jaw pieces. In most pictures they sure look it, but some pictures make me second guess it, and if they aren’t, they’re definitely still the attaching pieces, even if from different animals. I was looking at it backwards for awhile, which set me back, but I figured out the thicker part is actually the front of the jaw, right before the curve, or right after it starts, if it’s been glued on at the incorrect angle, which I think could also be possible. the 1st picture looks very strange because of how that smaller section suddenly drops down and gets taller, and especially strange after researching and finding out that it’s supposed to get wider there, but actually SHORTER. the 2nd picture looks good, except it MIGHT supposed to start slightly curving inward at the point of reattachment pics 1,3,4,6,&7 all make it look like they rent supposed to be associated together, but the other pics make it look very accurate. I don’t know what to think, so I thought I’d see what people with much better knowledge than I, think about it.
  2. Basilosaur lower frontal jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Basilosaur(us?) frontal lower jaw seyction, from Boujdour, in Morocco. Hopefully the species can be distinguished with some more info
  3. Basilosaur frontal lower jaw section

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Almost the entire frontal canine portion of the lower jaw of a Basilosaur. As you can see, the area where the absent front canines were, at the tip of the piece is visible, as well as where the missing last canines were situated. Although it was labeled as a Basilosaurus, I’m a little hesitant to consider that the case until I can personally corroborate the information. Apparently from Boujdour, I’m just having trouble finding information about which whales are, or are not found there, so until then I’ll leave it more open with just Basilosaur.
  4. Upper or Lower Megalodon teeth

    Hey guys. I picked this tooth up recently and have delved into the world of Meg teeth. I’ve been trying to identify the position of this tooth. I am having great trouble finding a way to properly identify lower vs upper teeth. I read some things that say it’s all in the root, V shaped is lower and U shaped is upper. Other things I’ve read are no it’s all in the curve of the tooth, uppers curve outwards while lowers curve inwards. So can someone help me out and teach me how to spot the differences and properly identify these teeth? And any idea on my tooth’s position? I had it as an upper A2 initially but now I’m not so sure. It measures 6-1/16” on the slant. Thanks y’all!
  5. Plesiosaur and pliosaur teeth

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Pliosaur teeth--liopleurodon ferox(?) & unidentified genera plesiosaur teeth--cryptoclidus sp & cryptoclidus sp (?) lower oxford clay callovian stage middle jurassic 160 mya peterborough, cambridge U.K. Hampton lakes & Bradley Fen.whittlesey
  6. Cretaceous crocodile; likely Dyrosaurus

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Unidentified Cretaceous crocodile species, suggested by multiple people, to appear to be a Dyrosaurus, came from the second phosphatic layer of a phosphate mine(what a shocker!)around the suburbs of Khouribga, Morocco. Original teeth, not replacements. Have gone through and cleaned up the base of some of the ones that had some sand around them.
  7. Ichthyosaur stomach contents

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Cross sections of the stomach, full of squid/cephalopod hooks and beaks, of an early Jurassic ichthyosaur (Stenopterygius quadriscissus). One slice has the animals ribs, the lighter tan objects, around the stomach, while the other is entirely of the stomach contents.
  8. enchodus tooth?

    Good afternoon I found this after a recent flood in a central Texas creek that regularly produces shark teeth. I have found a much smaller but similar tooth in a neighboring creek that resembles a herring tooth. Thanks in advance
  9. Interesting lower GW tooth from Peru

    I picked up this interesting Peruvian GW tooth. It looks like some minor damage, but upon closer inspection it appears to be part of its natural morphology. Looks like a transitional tooth, thoughts?
  10. Hi I hope someone can help me with this! I found these two very small fossils when wet sieving lower lias shell bed. They are about 2mm in size and look a bit like a cross between a crinoid and a bone-like substance. They are so small they were very hard to photograph even using the super-macro function on my camera but hopefully they are good enough for somebody to perhaps recognise what these are? I'd be very grateful as I am mighty curious! Thanks in advance. Sam
  11. Hi everybody. I'm trying to prepare this trilobite from Lower Devonian of Spain. Finalky I put off the rock and clean some parts, but now I have this problem: what's the best method for clean small details? What do you recommend me? Regards Juan
  12. Here's a treat for the troops. These have been hidden from public and scientific view since they were acquired from the finder. I purchased them from a civil war relic hunter and collector, who claimed to have these found together, but he wouldn't divulge exactly where. I suspect coastal Charleston, north to possibly southern NC, based upon his distance of travel from the sale, which was the old Civil War Museum, located in downtown Myrtle Beach - Mid 90's.(A friend who worked there, alerted me of the seller's presence.) The owner also collected fossils and displayed these, so it was known as a place of trade and sale for both artifacts and fossils. When I first saw them, I immediately recognized the possibility that they were a pair, and likely land finds, but what I didn't expect to discover, was their curious potential axial relationship. Published relative axial ratios of known or suspected associated sets reveal similar math to what I've found in these Both appear to be from the same side of the jaw, which makes a reasonable argument for how they may have literally, come together in the first place. I've managed to contact one nationally recognized expert who seems intrigued. Unfortunately, there's probably no DNA remaining, but if you've ever watched Forensic Files on TV, more than just DNA is often used to establish beyond a reasonable doubt. I think this is also a good time for a poll, recognizing of course that you can't see these in person.
  13. My Own Cave Bear

    Just wanted to share a new fossil I bought some days ago. It's the right side of a mandible from a cave bear (Ursus spelaeus). It's about 40,000 years old, 30 cm (12 in.) long, and was found in Romania. I find ice age mammals really interesting, so I'm happy I got this!
  14. From the album Kcw Site 2, Callahan Co., Tx

    Same fossil assemblage from SE Callahan County showing Oral surfaces.
  15. From the album Fluvanna, Texas Road Cut

    Notice the many borings indicative of predation. Found in road cut near Fluvanna
  16. From the album West Texas Fossils

    Fossil Assemblage from the Walnut/Comanche Facies in the Fluvanna, Tx Road Cut 26 Miles N. of Snyder
×