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Found 65 results

  1. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Agatized Fossil Tabulate Coral (Polished) Indonesia Miocene age (approx 20 million year old) Data: This interesting natural color stone was formed from ancient coral beds in Indonesia. Over the course of a very long time - perhaps 20 Million Years - the coral skeletal remains were gradually replaced with agate, chalcedony, or microcrystalline quartz, in a cell by cell replacement process that leaves flower-like patterns from the fossil skeletons imprinted three dimensionally in the stone. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: Hexacorallia Order: Tabulata
  2. Isurus hastalis tooth, Mako Shark 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cosmopolitodus hastalis/Isurus hastalis tooth, Mako Shark Olcese Sandstone, Bakersfield, California Miocene Age (23.03-5.333 million years ago) Cosmopolitodus hastalis, the broad-tooth mako or giant white shark (other common names include the extinct giant mako and broad-tooth white shark), is an extinct mackerel shark that lived from the Miocene epoch to the Pliocene epoch. Its teeth can reach lengths up to 3.5 in (7.5 cm) and are found worldwide. It is believed to be an ancestor to the great white shark, a fact supported by the transitional species Carcharodon hubbelli, and most likely would have been one of the major predators in its ecosystem; preying upon small whales and other mammals. The taxonomy of C. hastalis, especially the status of its genus, has a messy history and has long been subjected to debate. The initial scientific names was first given as Oxyrhina hastalis and Oxyrhina xiphodon for the narrow and broad-form variations respectively by Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz in his 1843 paper Recherches sur les poissons fossiles, although some indications show that he had coined the taxon as early as 1838.[4] Throughout the early and mid 20th century, different genera and species of other lamniformes would be clumped into the two taxons as the genus Oxyrhina began to be used as a wastebasket taxon. Sharks previously identified as variations of Oxyrhina hastalis or Oxyrhina xiphodon included two species of extinct ancestral makos Isurus desori and Isurus retroflexus, the serrated mako (Carcharomodus escheri), and the false-toothed mako (Parotodus benedenii).[5] Eventually, later studies would begin to show that much of the sharks within the genus and two species are distinct from each other, discarding the genus Oxyrhina altogether and creating another issue on what new taxons the sharks should be placed in. As of now, the genus is still uncertain and debated. Shortly after the discarding of the genus Oxyrhina, a review by Holec et al. (1995) placed the species hastalis and xiphodon as a species of mako under the genus Isurus, citing the similarities between the teeth of the two and that of modern mako sharks. In 2001, a study by Ward & Bonavi (2001) considered Isurus hastalis and Isurus xiphodon as conspecific and declared the latter a nomen dubium. Although this conclusion is widely accepted, some scientists disagree, with a study by Whitenack and Gottfried (2010) demonstrating geometrically morphological differences between I. hastalis and I. xiphodon. The scientific name Isurus hastalis is considered as the "traditional view" in the debate regarding the shark's taxonomy. Ward & Bonavi (2001) reexamined the teeth of I. hastalis and noted a strong morphological similarity between it and the extant great white shark. The study concluded that I. hastalis is a direct ancestor of the great white and is more related to it than other makos. This moved the species into the genus Cosmopolitodus, which was a move that was first proposed by Glikman (1964) but was long rejected beforehand. Later discoveries supports Ward & Bonavi's conclusion of its ancestry to the great white. Cione et al. (2011) noted a possibility of moving all species in the genus Cosmopolitodus into the genus Carcharodon to avoid a possible paraphyly that would occur if C. xiphodon is a putative sister species of Carcharodon. An analysis of a newly discovered Carcharodon hubbelli by Ehret et al. (2012) further cemented the theory of C. hastalis ancestry to the great white and supported Coine et al. (2011)'s proposal of moving Cosmopolitodus into the genus Carcharodon, remarking that the two genera were separated solely due to the lack of serrations by C. hastalis and the lack of lateral cusplets by C. carcharias and pointing out examples of Late Miocene C. hastalis teeth showing basal serrations. However, the genus Cosmopolitodus continues to be used by most scientists. C. hastalis teeth can grow up to 3.5 inches in length, suggesting a very large shark. Their bodies are probably very similar to that of modern great whites, or a transition between them and ancient makos. They are also believed to have a cosmopolitan distribution, with teeth being found worldwide. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Subclass: Elasmobranchii Superorder: Selachimorpha Order: Lamniformes Family: Lamnidae Genus: †Cosmopolitodus (Glikman, 1964) Species: †hastalis
  3. Isurus hastalis tooth, Mako Shark 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Cosmopolitodus hastalis/Isurus hastalis tooth, Mako Shark Olcese Sandstone, Bakersfield, California Miocene Age (23.03-5.333 million years ago) Cosmopolitodus hastalis, the broad-tooth mako or giant white shark (other common names include the extinct giant mako and broad-tooth white shark), is an extinct mackerel shark that lived from the Miocene epoch to the Pliocene epoch. Its teeth can reach lengths up to 3.5 in (7.5 cm) and are found worldwide. It is believed to be an ancestor to the great white shark, a fact supported by the transitional species Carcharodon hubbelli, and most likely would have been one of the major predators in its ecosystem; preying upon small whales and other mammals. The taxonomy of C. hastalis, especially the status of its genus, has a messy history and has long been subjected to debate. The initial scientific names was first given as Oxyrhina hastalis and Oxyrhina xiphodon for the narrow and broad-form variations respectively by Swiss naturalist Louis Agassiz in his 1843 paper Recherches sur les poissons fossiles, although some indications show that he had coined the taxon as early as 1838.[4] Throughout the early and mid 20th century, different genera and species of other lamniformes would be clumped into the two taxons as the genus Oxyrhina began to be used as a wastebasket taxon. Sharks previously identified as variations of Oxyrhina hastalis or Oxyrhina xiphodon included two species of extinct ancestral makos Isurus desori and Isurus retroflexus, the serrated mako (Carcharomodus escheri), and the false-toothed mako (Parotodus benedenii).[5] Eventually, later studies would begin to show that much of the sharks within the genus and two species are distinct from each other, discarding the genus Oxyrhina altogether and creating another issue on what new taxons the sharks should be placed in. As of now, the genus is still uncertain and debated. Shortly after the discarding of the genus Oxyrhina, a review by Holec et al. (1995) placed the species hastalis and xiphodon as a species of mako under the genus Isurus, citing the similarities between the teeth of the two and that of modern mako sharks. In 2001, a study by Ward & Bonavi (2001) considered Isurus hastalis and Isurus xiphodon as conspecific and declared the latter a nomen dubium. Although this conclusion is widely accepted, some scientists disagree, with a study by Whitenack and Gottfried (2010) demonstrating geometrically morphological differences between I. hastalis and I. xiphodon. The scientific name Isurus hastalis is considered as the "traditional view" in the debate regarding the shark's taxonomy. Ward & Bonavi (2001) reexamined the teeth of I. hastalis and noted a strong morphological similarity between it and the extant great white shark. The study concluded that I. hastalis is a direct ancestor of the great white and is more related to it than other makos. This moved the species into the genus Cosmopolitodus, which was a move that was first proposed by Glikman (1964) but was long rejected beforehand. Later discoveries supports Ward & Bonavi's conclusion of its ancestry to the great white. Cione et al. (2011) noted a possibility of moving all species in the genus Cosmopolitodus into the genus Carcharodon to avoid a possible paraphyly that would occur if C. xiphodon is a putative sister species of Carcharodon. An analysis of a newly discovered Carcharodon hubbelli by Ehret et al. (2012) further cemented the theory of C. hastalis ancestry to the great white and supported Coine et al. (2011)'s proposal of moving Cosmopolitodus into the genus Carcharodon, remarking that the two genera were separated solely due to the lack of serrations by C. hastalis and the lack of lateral cusplets by C. carcharias and pointing out examples of Late Miocene C. hastalis teeth showing basal serrations. However, the genus Cosmopolitodus continues to be used by most scientists. C. hastalis teeth can grow up to 3.5 inches in length, suggesting a very large shark. Their bodies are probably very similar to that of modern great whites, or a transition between them and ancient makos. They are also believed to have a cosmopolitan distribution, with teeth being found worldwide. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Subclass: Elasmobranchii Superorder: Selachimorpha Order: Lamniformes Family: Lamnidae Genus: †Cosmopolitodus (Glikman, 1964) Species: †hastalis
  4. PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates, and their closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged from them about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Infraorder: Cetacea Family: Phocoenidae
  5. PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates, and their closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged from them about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Infraorder: Cetacea Family: Phocoenidae
  6. PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates, and their closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged from them about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Infraorder: Cetacea Family: Phocoenidae
  7. PORPOISE VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Porpoise Vertebra North Carolina Miocene Age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Porpoises are a group of fully aquatic marine mammals that are sometimes referred to as mereswine,[1] all of which are classified under the family Phocoenidae, parvorder Odontoceti (toothed whales). There are six extant species of porpoise. They are small toothed whales that are very closely related to oceanic dolphins. The most obvious visible difference between the two groups is that porpoises have shorter beaks and flattened, spade-shaped teeth distinct from the conical teeth of dolphins. Porpoises, and other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates, and their closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged from them about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Infraorder: Cetacea Family: Phocoenidae
  8. Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid. They have well-developed hearing, that is well adapted for both air and water, so much so that some can survive even if they are blind. Some species are well adapted for diving to great depths. Almost all have a layer of fat, or blubber, under the skin to keep warm in the cold water, with the exception of river dolphins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Infraorder: Cetaxcea Parvorder: Odontoceti
  9. Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid. They have well-developed hearing, that is well adapted for both air and water, so much so that some can survive even if they are blind. Some species are well adapted for diving to great depths. Almost all have a layer of fat, or blubber, under the skin to keep warm in the cold water, with the exception of river dolphins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Infraorder: Cetaxcea Parvorder: Odontoceti
  10. Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid. They have well-developed hearing, that is well adapted for both air and water, so much so that some can survive even if they are blind. Some species are well adapted for diving to great depths. Almost all have a layer of fat, or blubber, under the skin to keep warm in the cold water, with the exception of river dolphins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Infraorder: Cetaxcea Parvorder: Odontoceti
  11. Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid. They have well-developed hearing, that is well adapted for both air and water, so much so that some can survive even if they are blind. Some species are well adapted for diving to great depths. Almost all have a layer of fat, or blubber, under the skin to keep warm in the cold water, with the exception of river dolphins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Infraorder: Cetaxcea Parvorder: Odontoceti
  12. Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid. They have well-developed hearing, that is well adapted for both air and water, so much so that some can survive even if they are blind. Some species are well adapted for diving to great depths. Almost all have a layer of fat, or blubber, under the skin to keep warm in the cold water, with the exception of river dolphins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Infraorder: Cetaxcea Parvorder: Odontoceti
  13. Odontoceti VERTEBRA 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Odontoceti Whale Vertebra SITE LOCATION: North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: The toothed whales (systematic name Odontoceti) are a parvorder of cetaceans that includes dolphins, porpoises, and all other whales possessing teeth, such as the beaked whales and sperm whales. Seventy-three species of toothed whales (also called odontocetes) are described. They are one of two living groups of cetaceans, the other being the baleen whales (Mysticeti), which have baleen instead of teeth. The two groups are thought to have diverged around 34 million years ago (mya). Toothed whales range in size from the 4.5 ft (1.4 m) and 120 lb (54 kg) vaquita to the 20 m (66 ft) and 55 t (61-short-ton) sperm whale. Several species of odontocetes exhibit sexual dimorphism, in that the females are larger than males. They have streamlined bodies and two limbs that are modified into flippers. Some can travel at up to 20 knots. Odontocetes have conical teeth designed for catching fish or squid. They have well-developed hearing, that is well adapted for both air and water, so much so that some can survive even if they are blind. Some species are well adapted for diving to great depths. Almost all have a layer of fat, or blubber, under the skin to keep warm in the cold water, with the exception of river dolphins. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Artiodactyla Family: Infraorder: Cetaxcea Parvorder: Odontoceti
  14. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  15. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  16. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  17. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Hemipristis serra (Snaggletooth shark) Teeth SITE LOCATION: Pungo Pits, Aurora, North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Hemipristis is a genus of weasel shark, family Hemigaleidae. It contains one extant species, the snaggletooth shark (H. elongata), as well as several extinct species. Hemipristis has two distinct type of teeth in each section of its jaw. The ones on the upper jaw act like knives, cutting through the flesh of the prey, while the pointed ones on the bottom act like forks, spearing the prey and holding it down. Because this shark was poorly studied in the past and its top and bottom jaw teeth differ to such a great degree, its top and lower jaw teeth were assigned to a separate genus in the past. Hemipristis serra - An extinct species from the Oligocene-Miocene of Florida, South Carolina, and other areas on the Atlantic coast. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Carcharhiniformes Family: Hemigaleidae Genus: Hemipristis Species: †serra
  18. Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Perciformes Family: Scombridae Genus: Sarda
  19. Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Perciformes Family: Scombridae Genus: Sarda
  20. Bonita Nose Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Bonita Nose Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Sarda is a genus of medium-sized, predatory ray-finned bony fish in the Scombridae family, and belonging to the tribe Sardini, more commonly called the Bonito tribe. There are four species which comprise the Sarda genus. One of those species, the Pacific bonito, is further divided into two subspecies. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Order: Perciformes Family: Scombridae Genus: Sarda
  21. Ray Stinger Barb fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks. They are classified in the suborder Myliobatoidei of the order Myliobatiformes and consist of eight families: Hexatrygonidae (sixgill stingray), Plesiobatidae (deepwater stingray), Urolophidae (stingarees), Urotrygonidae (round rays), Dasyatidae (whiptail stingrays), Potamotrygonidae (river stingrays), Gymnuridae (butterfly rays), and Myliobatidae (eagle rays). Most stingrays have one or more barbed stingers (modified from dermal denticles) on the tail, which are used exclusively in self-defense. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Myliobatiformes
  22. Ray Stinger Barb fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ray Stinger Barb fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Stingrays are a group of rays, which are cartilaginous fish related to sharks. They are classified in the suborder Myliobatoidei of the order Myliobatiformes and consist of eight families: Hexatrygonidae (sixgill stingray), Plesiobatidae (deepwater stingray), Urolophidae (stingarees), Urotrygonidae (round rays), Dasyatidae (whiptail stingrays), Potamotrygonidae (river stingrays), Gymnuridae (butterfly rays), and Myliobatidae (eagle rays). Most stingrays have one or more barbed stingers (modified from dermal denticles) on the tail, which are used exclusively in self-defense. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Chondrichthyes Order: Myliobatiformes
  23. Dolphin Teeth Fossils.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Teeth Fossils SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
  24. Coprolites.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coprolites SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: A coprolite is fossilized feces. Coprolites are classified as trace fossils as opposed to body fossils, as they give evidence for the animal's behaviour (in this case, diet) rather than morphology. The name is derived from the Greek words (kopros, meaning "dung") and (lithos, meaning "stone"). They were first described by William Buckland in 1829. Prior to this they were known as "fossil fir cones" and "bezoar stones". They serve a valuable purpose in paleontology because they provide direct evidence of the predation and diet of extinct organisms. Coprolites may range in size from a few millimetres to over 60 centimetres. Coprolites, distinct from paleofaeces, are fossilized animal dung. Like other fossils, coprolites have had much of their original composition replaced by mineral deposits such as silicates and calcium carbonates. Paleofaeces, on the other hand, retain much of their original organic composition and can be reconstituted to determine their original chemical properties, though in practice the term coprolite is also used for ancient human faecal material in archaeological contexts. In the same context, there are the urolites, erosions caused by evacuation of liquid wastes and nonliquid urinary secretions.
  25. Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Dolphin Inner Ear Bone Fossil SITE LOCATION: Pungo River or Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Miocene age (5.3-23 Million Years Ago) Data: Dolphins are a widely distributed and diverse group of aquatic mammals. They are an informal grouping within the order Cetacea, excluding whales and porpoises, so to zoologists the grouping is paraphyletic. The dolphins comprise the extant families Delphinidae (the oceanic dolphins), Platanistidae (the Indian river dolphins), Iniidae (the new world river dolphins), and Pontoporiidae (the brackish dolphins), and the extinct Lipotidae (baiji or Chinese river dolphin). There are 40 extant species of dolphins. Dolphins, alongside other cetaceans, belong to the clade Cetartiodactyla with even-toed ungulates. Cetaceans' closest living relatives are the hippopotamuses, having diverged about 40 million years ago. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Mammalia Order: Cetartiodactyla
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