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Found 317 results

  1. Attached are photos of a fossil rock my son found in the eastern TN mountains in May 2017. We had stopped near the top of amountain in the Clinch Mountain range and this was sitting in small wash pile on the side of the road (it had recently rained; I had been told by a UTK Paleobiology professor that the mountains around Bean Station and road cuts along highway 25E in that area might yield Ordovician fossils, as many would weather out and could be found lying on the ground). I believe that these are mostly trace fossils - fossil burrows or thalassinoides, along with some corals and brachiopods, but I can’t seem to find much information about marine trace fossils in that area, other than this is the Benholt Formation, and the spot has a lot of echinoderms and brachiopods. I believe that this would date from late Devonian or early Mississippian periods, but this is merely a guess, based on the few small fossil shell impressions in the rock. Any thoughts or insights are appreciated, thanks! Betsy
  2. Found in river bed

    Daughter found this in a stream bed today. First, is it actually a fossil, as we hope? The scoring on the rock looks incredibly symmetrical. The rock is quite hard, and I’m not sure what else could cause that kind of scoring, other than a fossilized impression of something. Across the top of the entire rock: just under 5cm. (E.g., top photo) Each ‘hash’ or ‘score’ is 5mm by 2mm. Second, any ideas of what it is? We’ve fossil hunted in the area and there’s a lot of Mississippian chert around there. Location circled in blue, if that helps. thank you ahead of time; you all are so helpful!
  3. Archimedes sp. (Owen 1838)

    From the album Bryozoa

    5cm. long Bangor Limestone Formation Mississippian Early Carboniferous From Northern Alabama
  4. Acrocrinus sp. (Yandell 1855)

    From the album Echinodermata

    7cm. long. Bangor Limestone Formation Mississippian Early Carboniferous From Northern Alabama
  5. Shark Tooth ID Mississippian?

    Hello, please help ID this shark tooth that I found years ago in a road cut on SR 37, close to Oolitic, Indiana, south of Bloomington, IN. from tip to tip about 7mm and size of the root from side to side also about 7 mm. The other fossils we found on that road cut were the crinoids, blastoid, brachiopods, etc., Missiissippian ear? You can see the crinoids, etc embedded next to the shark tooth. What kind of shark tooth is it? Thank you.
  6. Conularid

    Haven't posted anything in a while so I thought I'd show this conularid I found in the Ft. Payne. Its from a black shale member of the Lower Mississippian (Osagean) Ft Payne Chert This is positive and negative of a large flattened individual. If you look along the sides of the fossil, you can see some sections of it have been displaced. I also want to show this plant impression from the Lower Pennsylvanian Raccoon Mountain Formation. Im not sure if its an impression of a log or a bunch of Cordites leaves. let me know what you think it is.
  7. I'm confident that I found this fossil in a Mississippian age layer. I used the book, "Plant Fossils of West Virginia" by the WVGES to identify this fossil. The example that I found in the book is small and in grayscale, and visual representations of this plant are lacking online. Any help in confirming or identifying this fossil would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  8. Hello! I found this crinoid in Hardin County, KY earlier this morning that I would love to be able to ID further beyond "crinoid" haha. I found it as is (no prepwork or cleaning) in a scree pile of misc Mississippian rocks and so not sure if specifically from Salem limestone, Harrodsburg limestone, Borden formation, St Louis limestone, etc. I've included pics of the front and back of the rock/crinoid. If it helps with ID'ing, the darker portions of the rock seem to be that tar-type limestone (and not surface dirt or soil, etc). In reading the published literature on KY crinoids there seems to be quite a few genera identified from this era and this part of KY and so I would also like to learn from you on how one might narrow down a crinoid's genus. Would also be iinterested in hearing your opinions on if it would help having it prepped out a bit by someone. Thanks in advance for any assistance you could provide!
  9. Coral ID from Michigan needed

    I found these pieces over past year and half and have just gotten around to IDing them. I can’t find anything on the internet or my book on what these are. They are from the Mississippian as I’m from west Michigan. It seems they attach to things as oneI found on a horn coral. One in the picture seems to have shell on the bottom as well. An ID would be awesome because these have been a headache for me! Thank you!
  10. Coral Fossil?

    Found this in some creek gravel in Franklin, Tennessee. What species of coral is this (pretty sure it's a coral)?
  11. Mystery Cylindrical Fragment - Middle Tennessee

    This fossil was from a creek bed in Franklin, Tennessee. I have no paleontology or geology background so the little information I can give was that the rock it was in was about the size of a small toaster, and I chiseled it out (it actually popped out from the vibration). Imgur Photos: The rock was a dark grey (I have attached a photo of a different rock from the same area). I also included a photo shining a very bright flashlight through the bottom. The more crystallized part is where it was attached to the corner of the rock. https://imgur.com/gallery/PuchJQA EDIT: DSLR PICTURES HERE https://imgur.com/a/cqrjaBU
  12. I have several others, but this one is driving me nuts. It's from Virginia. This is not in a Pennsylvanian area, but instead either Silurian (I'm doubtful of this), or Devonian, or Mississippian. The area has what looks like coal and pyrite as well. There ammonites, brachiopods and orthocones in the area. Any ideas?
  13. Hello there! As it's getting nicer outside and things slowly turning back to normal, many of us are able to go out and enjoy the weather again. I journeyed to one of my favorite Burlington exposures just 10 minutes from my home. As it was so nice outside, I ran into a lot of friendly fishermen. Not unlike usual, its just me there for the fossils! My favorite spot I'm heading to has me walking a few miles before I start to hit the sweet spots. Along the few mile walk there, it looks like the beavers have been busy. You can tell as you approach the Burlington limestone alone by all the bits and pieces scattered along the nearby land. Today I decided to hunt the bank along the shore, and a layer about 10 feet above it. I have had good luck before finding some calyxs eroded out of the limestone by the waters edge, but the layer above requires splitting stone and further prep with air tools. All in all, I spent about 5 hours out fossil hunting. I've got about 75% of the finds cleaned up so far with the air scribe. Been cleaning as I go. A few of them still needs some scribe work, but I bagged a great variety! Species in the first picture. Crinoids: Azygocrinus rotundus, Uperocrinus pyriformis, Aorocrinus parvus, unknown species. Blastoids: Schizoblastus sayi Actinocrinites multiradiatus Very weathered Dorycrinus missouriensis (the famous 5 spined crinoid) Uperocrinus pyriformis Although the focus was on crinoids, I wanted to share my favorite piece of solitary and colonial corals found on the trip as well. I know some of you like pretty, sparkly corals. I like the crystalized caverns displayed in this one. And who doesn't like naturally exposed, colorful coral sections. That's all for this trip. I hope you all are able to get back out there, and enjoy yourselves and nature as soon as possible. Thanks for journeying along!
  14. Hello fossil experts! I have a background in geosciences but know little about fossils. I found the below fossils along the waterline of the Rouge River, a few miles north of Detroit (Michigan). Doing some research, I think these are from the Mucrospirifer order, probably of the Thedfordensis species. Do you agree? (longest is about 1.5 inch / 4 cm) The thing I'm most puzzled about is from what strata and geologic era they are from. The interweb tells me these Mucrospirifer in Michigan are mostly from the Middle Devonian (Antrim shale, Traverse Group), while the location where I found these (as well as all of the upstream terrain) has younger bedrock, from the early Carboniferous/Mississippian (Coldwater Shale). This Coldwater Shale is a pretty thick deposit so a river/glacier can not puncture it easily. I used the Bedrock Geology map from www.esrs.wmich.edu/mgs/webmgs/migis.html Any thoughts on this? Are these Mucrospirifer from the Middle Devonian or from the early Carboniferous/Mississippian? Thank you, Jasper
  15. Hello fossil experts! I have a background in geosciences but know very little about fossils. I found the below fossils along the Rouge River near Detroit (Michigan). Doing some quick research, I think these are from the Mucrospirifer order, probably of the Thedfordensis species. Do you agree? (longest is about 1.5 inch / 4 cm) The thing I'm most puzzled about is from what strata they are from. The interweb tells me these Mucrospirifer here are mostly from the Middle Devonian (Antrim shale, Traverse Group), while the location where I found these (as well as all of the upstream terrain) has younger bedrock, from the early Carboniferous/Mississippian (Coldwater Shale). This Coldwater Shale is a pretty thick deposit so a river/glacier can not puncture it easily. I used the Bedrock Geology map from www.esrs.wmich.edu/mgs/webmgs/migis.html Thank you very much for your insight! Jazz
  16. I am looking to trade small flat rate box(es) of Ordovician or Mississippian matrix for unsorted Permian Wellington f. (Waurika) or K Firesteel Creek (Hell Creek) matrix. PM me if you are interested. (or any other interesting micro faunal matrix)
  17. Rock or fossilized bone

    I found either a rock or a fossilized bone in NW Arkansas along the War Eagle River earlier this year. The War Eagle Quadrangle https://core.ac.uk/download/pdf/72842749.pdf has sections that are Ordovician, Devonian, and Mississippian. That being said...is this just a rock? I don't want to state why I think it might be one thing or another....needing a fresh perspective.
  18. A Longer and Muddier Stop

    I took a much needed break this morning and went fossil hunting for a couple of hours. I decided that I wanted to go back to the same water eroded hill that I made a quick stop at the other day. It rained last night, so the place was a muddy mess, but I had a good time and it took my mind off of things. It's supposed to rain here for the next 2-3 days. Can't wait to see what else is revealed afterwards. I'll stop in again. Preferably after it dries out for a couple of days. Here are pictures of the hillside that I have been working. The red clay is littered with rocks and fossils that have been weathered and washed out of the hill by runoff. Fragments of the rugose coral Acrocyathus floriformis litter the ground. Thanks to @Jeffrey P for help with the ID! Unless you look 5 feet one way or the other... The next picture was taken 5 feet away from the spot in the above pic. It seems that the fossils were very localized. I made multiple stops at different hills like this in the same area. I found 1 other that had a good amount of fossils in a small section. Most were fossil barren, or had very few. Still, there was plenty to keep me entertained. When I took a gander past the coral fragments, I was able to find a few more gastropods. The biggest thing I had to watch out for was my own pareidolia. The geology of the area can really trick you if you are not careful. There are also more modern evidence of creatures, and some areas where fill rock has been brought in; presumably to help with erosion. Below are a few things I had to look out for... Here are a bunch of eroded limestone fragments mixed in with coral fragments. They can definitely trick the eyes at first glance. Coral/Bryozoan fragments, or water eroded and shaped limestone? Unfortunately, limestone. At first glance I thought I was seeing the internal structure of a coral colony. Maybe a tabulate coral? Nope. Another look alike. A modern gastropod. Once I got home I cleaned the mud off with water and a soft brush. Not a bad haul for a few hours. I took quite a few pieces of coral. Some I will give to my son, some will go in my collection, and maybe, just maybe, some will end up in an auction lot to support the forum (once all this virus stuff blows over). I'm actually sorting through my collection and will hopefully have more to add to the auction pile, but that's a discussion for a different thread. Towards the end of the hunt I was on the lookout for anything branching, or that resembled a coral colony. I was hoping to find a relatively complete coral head, but alas luck was not with me. I was still able to find some nice pieces though. Here are some of the better ones with multiple coralites. A few gastropod steinkerns. This one I really liked. It's a little over a centimeter in height, and still stuck in the matrix. And last, but not least... I always pick up a few geological pieces that catch my eye. My twin is more of a rock hound so I always let him take a look. If he doesn't want them. The "cool rocks" go to my son. If all that fails, I have a "cool rock shelf" that gets the left overs. That's it for now. I had an enjoyable time today that gave me a much needed break from all the happenings in the world. It was nice to dig in the mud and forget my troubles for a few hours.
  19. A Quick Stop

    With all of the recent field trip reports being posted I have been that I haven't been able to get out there yet myself. The weather has been warmer than usual, but it’s also been rainy. Today I had very little time, but on my way home from giving my father-in-law a helping hand, I was able to make a quick stop at a local Mississippian site that is 5 minutes from my house. I believe it is St. Louis Limestone, but need to verify. I was only at the site for 20 minutes or so, but I picked up a handful of things. I didn’t get any pictures from the field as I was in a rush, but a few of the finds are below. I’ve known about this spot for a while, but it’s the first time I have stopped there. I think that’s because when I get a chance to go hunting I want to go to a place that it a little farther away since I have the extra time. I have been telling myself “It’s close. I can stop there any time...” I finally took the time, albeit a short amount, and I’m glad I did. The site is a low road cut. Well... it’s more of a water eroded slope on the side of the road than an actual cut. Little bed rock is exposed, except fragments mixed in with the soil from erosion. The dirt in the area is locally called red clay. With the recent rains, it was very muddy and the red clay tends to stain whatever it touches. You can see a reddish orange hue to the fossils. This was after a cleaning with water and a brush. I haven’t had a chance to try and ID these yet, so if anyone has any suggestions feel free to throw them out there! The area is littered with pieces of this rugose coral. This picture of a calice is a little more out of focus than I realized, but you get the idea... EDIT: Swapped the out of focus picture with one that is a little less fuzzy. This rock is full of these little gastropods. They are only about 1cm in height. I also found this gastropod and brachiopod. A close up of the gastropod. I like it. Hopefully this quick stop will hold me over until I can get out there for a long relaxing hunt.
  20. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  21. I’m hoping someone on here has some spare matrix from the Mississippian Golconda Fm in southern Illinois. The roadcuts near Anna and Vienna are pretty well known (I know a few members here have hunted there), but at over 6 hours away it’s a bit too long of a trek for me right now. A recent paper on microfossils from there piqued my interest and I’d like to try and process matrix to search for some. If you have any, PM me and we can work something out.
  22. Scientists have found a treasure trove of Mississippian shark fossils in Mammoth cave, Kentucky. ARTICLE HERE. Quote: "Based on what was exposed in the cave wall, Hodnett said the find includes a lower jaw, skull cartilage and several teeth. Hodnett determined the shark belonged to a species called "Saivodus striatus" from the Late Mississippian period, about 330 to 340 million years ago. @Archie "More than 100 individual specimens have been discovered during the project. Hodnett said teeth and dorsal fins of other shark species are also exposed in the cave ceiling and walls. "We've just scratched the surface," Hodnett said. "But already it's showing that Mammoth Cave has a rich fossil shark record." Pictures from article:
  23. Amazing Arizona Adventure II

    I went back to my very productive Devonian Martin Formation and Mississippian Escabrosa Formation near Superior, Arizona to retrieve my large single crinoid head fossil. Amazing Arizona Adventure original post link After some acid prep four crinoids and one blastoid were clustered together. Currents probably sorted them by size and shape. Several more hours of acid prep made the remaining four best ones stand out. I had to carefully break away pieces of shell that adhered and covered the crinoids and blastoid. Careful monitoring of their progress prevented any of them falling off the matrix. The resulting piece is probably the finest crinoid and blastoid assemblage ever found in Arizona. Finding one crinoid or blastoid cast in Arizona is very hard let alone four or five together. The two largest crinoids in the center and left are likely Physetocrinus lobatus. The upper right is an Orophocrinus saltensis blastoid. The lower right is an unknown crinoid. (Any idea what it is?) The field of view is about 7.5 cm wide. Keep looking for updates as I prep and post more fossils. I found several loose crinoid heads.
  24. Does anyone recognise this? I noticed it when scanning photos of a recently cut and polished piece of Frosterley "Marble" from Weardale, Co. Durham, UK. (upper Mississippian, Pendleian). It shows in section as a rod about 5mm long, with perforations, central ridge and a fine reticulate pattern. My first thought was a Fenestella fragment but it doesn't look regular enough and I can find no mention of the reticulate structure. Also, I've never seen bryozoans in this part of the limestone though they occur at other levels. Now I'm wondering about a dasycladacean alga - some look vaguely similar but all the Carboniferous ones I can find references to look simpler and fuzzier. Scale bar is 1cm, divisions are 1mm Contrast enhanced In context, showing ghostly appearance amongst the corals
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