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Found 296 results

  1. I’m hoping someone on here has some spare matrix from the Mississippian Golconda Fm in southern Illinois. The roadcuts near Anna and Vienna are pretty well known (I know a few members here have hunted there), but at over 6 hours away it’s a bit too long of a trek for me right now. A recent paper on microfossils from there piqued my interest and I’d like to try and process matrix to search for some. If you have any, PM me and we can work something out.
  2. Scientists have found a treasure trove of Mississippian shark fossils in Mammoth cave, Kentucky. ARTICLE HERE. Quote: "Based on what was exposed in the cave wall, Hodnett said the find includes a lower jaw, skull cartilage and several teeth. Hodnett determined the shark belonged to a species called "Saivodus striatus" from the Late Mississippian period, about 330 to 340 million years ago. @Archie "More than 100 individual specimens have been discovered during the project. Hodnett said teeth and dorsal fins of other shark species are also exposed in the cave ceiling and walls. "We've just scratched the surface," Hodnett said. "But already it's showing that Mammoth Cave has a rich fossil shark record." Pictures from article:
  3. Amazing Arizona Adventure II

    I went back to my very productive Devonian Martin Formation and Mississippian Escabrosa Formation near Superior, Arizona to retrieve my large single crinoid head fossil. Amazing Arizona Adventure original post link After some acid prep four crinoids and one blastoid were clustered together. Currents probably sorted them by size and shape. Several more hours of acid prep made the remaining four best ones stand out. I had to carefully break away pieces of shell that adhered and covered the crinoids and blastoid. Careful monitoring of their progress prevented any of them falling off the matrix. The resulting piece is probably the finest crinoid and blastoid assemblage ever found in Arizona. Finding one crinoid or blastoid cast in Arizona is very hard let alone four or five together. The two largest crinoids in the center and left are likely Physetocrinus lobatus. The upper right is an Orophocrinus saltensis blastoid. The lower right is an unknown crinoid. (Any idea what it is?) The field of view is about 7.5 cm wide. Keep looking for updates as I prep and post more fossils. I found several loose crinoid heads.
  4. Does anyone recognise this? I noticed it when scanning photos of a recently cut and polished piece of Frosterley "Marble" from Weardale, Co. Durham, UK. (upper Mississippian, Pendleian). It shows in section as a rod about 5mm long, with perforations, central ridge and a fine reticulate pattern. My first thought was a Fenestella fragment but it doesn't look regular enough and I can find no mention of the reticulate structure. Also, I've never seen bryozoans in this part of the limestone though they occur at other levels. Now I'm wondering about a dasycladacean alga - some look vaguely similar but all the Carboniferous ones I can find references to look simpler and fuzzier. Scale bar is 1cm, divisions are 1mm Contrast enhanced In context, showing ghostly appearance amongst the corals
  5. Tree Fossil?

    Found this piece of sandstone in Sullivan Co., PA. It comes from either the Huntley Mtn. Fm. (Mississippian/Devonian) or the Burgoon Ss. (Mississippian). What could have made these concentric rings? They go through the rock perpendicular to bedding. It's odd that the center is mostly round but further out is more square. Could it be a tree fossil? That is the only thing I can think of.
  6. A couple of summers ago I found what is maybe my favorite Mississippian/Lower Carboniferous Visean shark fossil in Fife, Scotland and with some time off over the holiday season and pretty grim weather I've finally got round to prepping it When I found it there were three damaged but very near complete large Saivodus striatus teeth, the root minus the central cusp of either a smaller S. saivodus or possibly a Cladodus mirabilis and a partial unidentified spine. I've exposed and restored the three big teeth to make them look complete again as best I can for now and exposed the rest of the root of the smaller one but will leave it as is along with the spine. Unfortunately I cant find the original pic of it as found but originally the tooth on the far left was missing the tips of the lateral cusps and the central cusp from about half way, the middle tooth was missing about half its root and one lateral cusp, and the tooth on the far right was missing a chunk out of one side including the lateral cusp and the opposite lateral cusp. I used resin for the restoration which I carved and then painted with water color and acrylic paints and finished the cusps with a coat of gloss varnish and the roots with matt varnish. I'm fairly happy with the restoration, it does seem to look quite a bit better in real life as photos seem to show up the restoration a lot more. The teeth are on a nice big block I've cut a base on in a thin layer around what seems to be a ball of clay with calcite infilled septarian cracks again, there's a few different types of invertebrate such as bryozoans, crinoids, brachiopods and a nice coral which I love finding teeth with as it gives them context. The block is 14cm tall and the teeth are all 2cm x 2cm.
  7. Hi guys, This is my first posting on the forum, constructive criticism is appreciated. Each year, when the water level in the lake is lowered in late fall, I go there in search of crinoids The first set of photos shows one of my better finds of 2017. This small slab (approximately 9 x 12 inches) had partially eroded from the shore. I was more than pleased to see all crinoids exposed along the weathered edge. Hopefully, there are some nice ones hidden in the center. Last year, while walking up a watershed near the lake, I found a slab of bedded limestone with the calyx pictured below. I decided to downsize the slab. The rock split along the bedding plane to reveal this: There were a couple of similar but smaller slabs nearby. I carried them back to the truck to split at home. I found one more nice calyx embedded in the rock. Pictured below are two more of last year's finds: While walking next to the waterline, I found the fragmented cephalopod pictured below. I was not sure if I wanted to keep it, so I set it aside to examine more closely on my way back. It was only after I looked at it again on my return that I noticed the tooth at the top. This year has not proven to be as fruitful as last year. The first photo pictures a calyx in somewhat rotten matrix. What should I use to stabilize it? One more Does anyone know the bryozoan to which the funnel shaped appendage pictured below belong? Thanks for looking
  8. What makes square holes

    Hello, I pulled a large rock out of the ground a few weeks ago and I'm now cleaning up some of the small rocks that broke off as it came up. This one caught my eye cause it's got a trilobite but after cleaning I noticed all of these rectangular holes on the side. The lines on the rule are 16th inch. Any suggestions on what would've created rectangular holes like this? Thanks for looking!
  9. Amazing Arizona Adventure

    I found one of my most interesting and productive fossil sites ever east of Phoenix near Superior, Arizona in late November. The hill contained outcrops of the Devonian Martin Formation and the Mississippian Escabrosa Formation which is roughly the same age as the Redwall Limestone found further north. My first interesting find was several Pachyphyllum corals with very small corallites. The “craters” within the corallites averages just under 2 mm which suggested that these were the P. nevadense species which is not common in the Payson area further to the north. The coral is about mm across. I found a relatively rare Iowaphyllum nisbeti coral that was found by Gladys Nisbet, a botanist from the Phoenix area. The colonial coral is noted for its large corallites with prominent ridges in between. Coral colony is about 9 cm x 8 cm. Here is partially silicified Alveolites coral with very distinctive compressed fish-scale like corallite tops. This piece is about 65 mm across. Here is a nice massive Thamnopora coral 17 cm across. Along with the Alveolites were two types of stromatoporoid sponges. The first is an approximately 15 cm across Amphipora sp. with mound like mamelons. The second stromatoporoid has nice laminations with some vertical pillars. View is about 4 cm across. The most amazing find was several silicified calyxes of a blastoid and at least three species of crinoids found in the Mississippian Escabrosa Limestone. Interior and exterior molds of crinoids and blastoids are occasionally found further to the north in the Paleozoic rocks. Originals or casts are rare in Arizona especially when they are found in a few square meter area. This is the best spot that I have ever found for blastoids and crinoids. The largest and best blastoid was a 31 mm wide Orophocrinus saltensis that I have entered in the current Fossil of the Month contest. It was near maximum size for the species. I have seen no finer blastoid on the internet from Arizona. Cast your vote for the battle of the blastoids. I found at least three species of silicified crinoids. If you know what they are, please let me know. Species 1 is 11 mm across by 14 mm high. Species 2 is a cup that is 17 mm across by 18 mm high. Species 3 has interesting triangular patterns and is about 2 cm across by about 2 cm high. It is in a large rock that I need to break down so that I can carry it away. I planning on going back to the site to look for more goodies.
  10. Is this bryozoan or just rock

    Hello again, I found these 2 rocks this morning on my property. Redwall limestone, Mooney falls member, Arizona, Mississippian. I think the tiny branch looking thing might be bryozoan and I don't know if the bumpy rock is anything at all. What do you guys think, are these just weathered rocks?
  11. Mother Nature graced us locally with another temperate day so I had time to squeeze in a long exploration into some hidden canyons that comprise a large subset of the local Mississippian formation known as 'Lake Valley' To get to the canyons of interest I walked through Silurian-Devonian exposures but I did not stop to explore for anything. Here was my first view toward the hidden Lake Valley Formation canyons. You can see deformation from the mud mounding. More to follow.
  12. Crinoid like

    Hello and thanks for looking. I found these on my property in NW Arizona. It's Mississippian, Mooney falls member of the redwall limestone. I found the little pill like fossil a few days ago and then the column today. These are not like the tons of Crinoid fossils I've found nearby and I can't seem to find anything that matches online. I'm sure some of you will know immediately what it is. Please help if you have and ideas. Thanks
  13. Fossil found in marine limestone deposit Ut. About 9” long. Formation from Mississippian according to USFS.
  14. Stethacanthus altonensis Oklahoma

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    A 340-360 Million year old Stethacanthus tooth from Caney Shale, Oklahoma.
  15. Stethacanthus altonensis Oklahoma

    From the album Odd and Rare Shark Teeth

    A 340-360 Million year old Stethacanthus tooth from Caney Shale, Oklahoma.
  16. Michigan Fossil ID

    This was found at Millennium Park near Grand Rapids, MI. I'm thinking Bryozoan?...but does anyone have an idea of species?
  17. Hello. I have still been going through boxes of mostly cave mineral from a large estate sale purchase, mostly consisting of cave minerals. The tags that remain are not attached to the pieces and usually scattered among many boxes. This amazing plate I found recently and believe I finally found the label. I just need justification. I haven't found any other plates like this one. It's stunning in person!
  18. Is This A Stromatoporoid?

    Hello, I found this rock in Alabama (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone) and have been trying to figure out what is all over it. After searching the forum and the internet, the closest match I could find is it possibly being a stromatoporoid, showing mamelons? If not, can anyone tell me what it might be? (My husband says it looks like melted plastic to him. I’m really hoping he isn’t correct. Lol) Thanks!
  19. Presumably, having been tumbled along the robustness of the Knob Creek's quartz bearing country rock of the Hoosier National Forest in the Bartlettsville (North Lawrence Co.) IN area, the tip of the Crown (Calyx) of this large Crinoid appears to have been sheered off at some point to give the observer a view (in crossection) of the inside of calyx which reveals absolutely nothing but Silica replacement of all internal parts. This sample is of the Harrodsburg Formation in the Sanders Group, Lower Middle Mississippian Time.
  20. Our new Shark Education Displays

    Pictures first, full descriptions will follow Paleozoic Sharks and “Sharks”
  21. Hash Plate I.D. Request

    Hi, I’m hoping someone will let me know which type of fossils are in this rock. I found it in Alabama. (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone) Thanks!
  22. A fossil hunt for. . . geodes?

    Sometimes, when you go on a fossil hunt, you find more than just fossils. Some friends and I traveled to southeastern Iowa in Spring '18 to scour the Mississippian for fossils, but while there, we noticed that many of the homes that we drove by sported geodes in their front yards. Intrigued, we decided to investigate for ourselves. As it turns out, the area is well-known for its geodes (Iowa's state rock is the geode), so we promptly decided that we had to collect some for ourselves. We eventually found a privately owned piece of property where we could fill a bucket with geodes for about $20, descended upon a stream cutting into the bedrock, and filled a bucket in short order. Then, on a return trip to Iowa a month later, we found another outcrop of geodes along the Mississippi River. Once again, we collected handfuls. Then, once we got back, we split them with a geode cracker. They varied in quality; some were stunningly beautiful, and others were less so. They were filled with all manner of minerals: some had chalcedony fillings; others had quartz crystals, and still others had minerals that I didn't recognize. The colors varied, too: pink, white, light blue, red, and brown. As it turns out, we were a little overzealous in our efforts; we collected about 50 pounds of rocks. We've given them away to as many friends would like them and have only just now run out of them a year later. Pictured below is a fraction of the haul. If you happen to find yourself in this neck of the woods, then remember: the Osagean of Iowa and Illinois has more than just crinoids. If you would like more information on them, where you can hunt for them, or even the annual Geode Fest, then check out this link. http://keokukiowatourism.org/geodes/index.php
  23. Hi again! Two more ID requests - this time they're from the Bangor Limestone in Alabama, USA (Lower Carboniferous, Mississippian). Specimen #1: An orthoconic nautiloid - could it be Brachycycloceras sp.? Specimen #2: A blastoid - Pentremites sp.? Thanks for your help! Monica
  24. Identification Request

    While out fossil hunting in Alabama (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone) earlier this week, I found a hash plate full of crinoid stem segments which also has a small fossil on it which I cannot identify. Is it a bryozoan?
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