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Found 329 results

  1. Here are some finds from a late August to early September long loop road trip, fossil hunting through Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Indiana and Kentucky. I'll appreciate detailed specimen identification help. First photo shows brachiopods & a trilobite from the Devonian Silica Shale Formation near Sylvania, northwestern Ohio.
  2. I found this fossil back in 2014 at Cedar Creek Reservoir in Franklin County, Alabama. I was told the fossils we'd find there would be Mississippian, contained in Bangor Limestone. When I first found this I thought it might be a trilobite butt or a shark tooth and I recently decided to try to clean it, and now I don't know what it is there are two depressions under each prong, and the prongs bow back up (couldn't really get a side pic) The pictures show the uncovered fossil (the lighter material was what was initially uncovered). Thank you for any assistance! On a separate note: I also feel terrible that I ended up damaging it a little (chipped the left edge on the bottom most segment)
  3. Back to the Ohio Valley

    Hi Everyone, I took a 2 week trip to the Ohio Valley, arriving back in New York about a week ago. It was primarily a family visit since many of my relatives now reside in the Elizabethtown, KY area. However, the Ohio Valley, as some of you know, is very rich in Paleozoic fossils and I just had to make a few stops on my way there and back as well as between family engagements. I will try to share enough to give you all a gist of it: It was a long day's drive from the northern suburbs of New York City to Richmond, Indiana where I spent the first night. The next day I was headed down State Road 101 to Garr Hill, to collect in the Upper Ordovician Liberty Formation. It was my first time at the site and everything I found was collected from loose rocks at or near the base of the outcrop. A couple of pictures:
  4. Very odd little fossil found today in the Mississippian Warsaw Formation of St Louis County, Missouri, USA. All insights appreciated.
  5. I'm going to be taking a drive this year from Pittsburgh to Charlottesville to SE Kentucky, to Knoxville, TN to catch some of the autumn foliage, and was wondering if anyone had any suggestion on fossilized foliage outcrops or spoils piles. I'm trying to focus on ferns and other plants, as I've collected a lot of marine fossils previously and want to get some new types of specimens. I've seen some stuff online about Ambridge, PA and Big Hill in KY, but haven't been able to find too many other public spots besides that. Just wondering if anyone had any suggestions or recommendations. Thanks.
  6. I found these several geodized Mississippian marine fossils in southern Indiana. They may not all be hollow with quartz crystals inside, but many are. The fossils usually balloon in size in the geode-forming process. Here's 2 sides of a crinoid calyx...
  7. The Day of The Echinoderm

    Firstly, a big THANK YOU to @Jeffrey P for hanging out with me for the day! What a knowledgeable, generous, and all around swell guy! If you ever get the opportunity to hunt with Jeff, I highly encourage you to. Jeff and I met at around 8:30 am, and after a quick transfer of his gear to my truck, we were off. We first drove about 45 minutes south to the small town of Wax, to hunt the Upper Mississippian. Specifically to look for blastoids and crinoid calyxes that were known to be found in the area. As it happens, luck was with us! Unfortunately, I didn't take the field pictures that I typically do. Due to the fact that I went swimming with my phone a month or so ago . I am down to using my wife's old phone that I found in the junk drawer (Yes Jeff, it's pink... ). I didn't take it out much to avoid the inevitable drop down the hill side. Especially since it doesn't even have a protective case... Jeff snapped a few pictures. Maybe he will chime in and add them when he is able. For the first few minutes we didn't find much besides crinoid stems, bryozoans, and the deflated or crushed brachiopods common to the site. The main species of brach found in the area doesn't seem to have fared well during the fossilization process. Finding a nice inflated one is a rarity. After a few minutes of adjusting our eyes to spot the small finds located here, we started to pick out the blastoids. Jeff was the first to find one, and gifted it to me as he had already collected a few on his previous trips here. Thanks Jeff for gifting me my first blastoid! Most of the blastoids, while small, were whole and nicely preserved. Here are a few examples. I did happen to find the largest blastoid from the site, and one of the larger ones Jeff had seen from here. Super pumped about this one! Crinoid calyx were also to be found here. We only found a few, but being that these were also a first for me, I was extremely excited to find them! The brachiopods I previously mentioned were abundant, and besides crinoid stems, were the most abundant fossil to be found here. Again, they are almost always deflated. Finding a nice inflated one would be a real treat. These other little Spirifer(?) brachiopods could also be found. Although they were more uncommon that the previous ones. They are very small and delicate. Often crumbling when trying to pick them up. Bivalves could be found here also, but were extremely rare. Jeff was excited to find a couple, but I struck out. Other things that could be found were crinoid stems, the odd solitary rugose coral, and of course the ever present bryozoans. We then headed to a site a few miles down the road in Leitchfield. Stay tuned!
  8. Mississippian Brachiopod ID Help

    On a recent trip to collect Carboniferous marine life I came across these brachiopods at an exposure of the Late Mississippian Wymps Gap Limestone/Mauch Chunk Formation. I have read several articles now about the fauna of the Wymps Gap Limestone but have not been able to find an identification that matches. They look a little bit like Leptaena but of course Leptaena had already gone extinct by the Late Mississippian. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  9. This is a scarce crinoid in the Mississippian of my area, usually found here as isolated columnals (and never articulated). So I was pleased to find this group yesterday on my first 2020 trip to a favourite locality in the Durham Dales. Needs a bit of TLC and probably light air abrading (it's fragile) but not bad for a quick brush and rinse. Mississippian, Brigantian, Three Yard Limestone (shale parting), Co. Durham, NE England.
  10. A Nice Surprise!

    Usually I go with a paleontology class to a quarry in Alabama, where the Mississippian (Lower Carboniferous) Bangor Formation limestone is quarried for cement. The upper layers are too shale and silica rich for cement, so they are stripped and piled to the side. This material is what we are allowed to search. The last time we went (March 2019, no 2020 trip due to Covid-19) I brought back a small crinoid calyx that was showing on the side of a piece of rock. The rock seemed pretty solid and my experience has been that if there is more to the crinoid, forcing a split tends to break through the fossil. So, I put the rock on my back deck and forgot about it. A couple of days ago I was cleaning up and noticed the rock, and also noticed that a year and a bit of exposure to the Georgia weather had caused the rock to split. I lifted the top off and found this very nice surprise! The only prep it has received is cleaning with a tooth brush. Nice to find something, as I have not been out collecting since November. Before: After: Phanocrinus bellulus crown 4.6 cm. Don
  11. Mississippian fish bit

    I found while going over some hash plates from the Late Mississippian (Chesterian) of Indiana. Looks like some kind of scale/denticle perhaps. I feel like I've seen one before but can't put my finger on it. Any thoughts?
  12. Attached are photos of a fossil rock my son found in the eastern TN mountains in May 2017. We had stopped near the top of amountain in the Clinch Mountain range and this was sitting in small wash pile on the side of the road (it had recently rained; I had been told by a UTK Paleobiology professor that the mountains around Bean Station and road cuts along highway 25E in that area might yield Ordovician fossils, as many would weather out and could be found lying on the ground). I believe that these are mostly trace fossils - fossil burrows or thalassinoides, along with some corals and brachiopods, but I can’t seem to find much information about marine trace fossils in that area, other than this is the Benholt Formation, and the spot has a lot of echinoderms and brachiopods. I believe that this would date from late Devonian or early Mississippian periods, but this is merely a guess, based on the few small fossil shell impressions in the rock. Any thoughts or insights are appreciated, thanks! Betsy
  13. Found in river bed

    Daughter found this in a stream bed today. First, is it actually a fossil, as we hope? The scoring on the rock looks incredibly symmetrical. The rock is quite hard, and I’m not sure what else could cause that kind of scoring, other than a fossilized impression of something. Across the top of the entire rock: just under 5cm. (E.g., top photo) Each ‘hash’ or ‘score’ is 5mm by 2mm. Second, any ideas of what it is? We’ve fossil hunted in the area and there’s a lot of Mississippian chert around there. Location circled in blue, if that helps. thank you ahead of time; you all are so helpful!
  14. Archimedes sp. (Owen 1838)

    From the album Bryozoa

    5cm. long Bangor Limestone Formation Mississippian Early Carboniferous From Northern Alabama
  15. Acrocrinus sp. (Yandell 1855)

    From the album Echinodermata

    7cm. long. Bangor Limestone Formation Mississippian Early Carboniferous From Northern Alabama
  16. Shark Tooth ID Mississippian?

    Hello, please help ID this shark tooth that I found years ago in a road cut on SR 37, close to Oolitic, Indiana, south of Bloomington, IN. from tip to tip about 7mm and size of the root from side to side also about 7 mm. The other fossils we found on that road cut were the crinoids, blastoid, brachiopods, etc., Missiissippian ear? You can see the crinoids, etc embedded next to the shark tooth. What kind of shark tooth is it? Thank you.
  17. Conularid

    Haven't posted anything in a while so I thought I'd show this conularid I found in the Ft. Payne. Its from a black shale member of the Lower Mississippian (Osagean) Ft Payne Chert This is positive and negative of a large flattened individual. If you look along the sides of the fossil, you can see some sections of it have been displaced. I also want to show this plant impression from the Lower Pennsylvanian Raccoon Mountain Formation. Im not sure if its an impression of a log or a bunch of Cordites leaves. let me know what you think it is.
  18. I'm confident that I found this fossil in a Mississippian age layer. I used the book, "Plant Fossils of West Virginia" by the WVGES to identify this fossil. The example that I found in the book is small and in grayscale, and visual representations of this plant are lacking online. Any help in confirming or identifying this fossil would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  19. Hello! I found this crinoid in Hardin County, KY earlier this morning that I would love to be able to ID further beyond "crinoid" haha. I found it as is (no prepwork or cleaning) in a scree pile of misc Mississippian rocks and so not sure if specifically from Salem limestone, Harrodsburg limestone, Borden formation, St Louis limestone, etc. I've included pics of the front and back of the rock/crinoid. If it helps with ID'ing, the darker portions of the rock seem to be that tar-type limestone (and not surface dirt or soil, etc). In reading the published literature on KY crinoids there seems to be quite a few genera identified from this era and this part of KY and so I would also like to learn from you on how one might narrow down a crinoid's genus. Would also be iinterested in hearing your opinions on if it would help having it prepped out a bit by someone. Thanks in advance for any assistance you could provide!
  20. Coral ID from Michigan needed

    I found these pieces over past year and half and have just gotten around to IDing them. I can’t find anything on the internet or my book on what these are. They are from the Mississippian as I’m from west Michigan. It seems they attach to things as oneI found on a horn coral. One in the picture seems to have shell on the bottom as well. An ID would be awesome because these have been a headache for me! Thank you!
  21. Coral Fossil?

    Found this in some creek gravel in Franklin, Tennessee. What species of coral is this (pretty sure it's a coral)?
  22. Mystery Cylindrical Fragment - Middle Tennessee

    This fossil was from a creek bed in Franklin, Tennessee. I have no paleontology or geology background so the little information I can give was that the rock it was in was about the size of a small toaster, and I chiseled it out (it actually popped out from the vibration). Imgur Photos: The rock was a dark grey (I have attached a photo of a different rock from the same area). I also included a photo shining a very bright flashlight through the bottom. The more crystallized part is where it was attached to the corner of the rock. https://imgur.com/gallery/PuchJQA EDIT: DSLR PICTURES HERE https://imgur.com/a/cqrjaBU
  23. I have several others, but this one is driving me nuts. It's from Virginia. This is not in a Pennsylvanian area, but instead either Silurian (I'm doubtful of this), or Devonian, or Mississippian. The area has what looks like coal and pyrite as well. There ammonites, brachiopods and orthocones in the area. Any ideas?
  24. Hello there! As it's getting nicer outside and things slowly turning back to normal, many of us are able to go out and enjoy the weather again. I journeyed to one of my favorite Burlington exposures just 10 minutes from my home. As it was so nice outside, I ran into a lot of friendly fishermen. Not unlike usual, its just me there for the fossils! My favorite spot I'm heading to has me walking a few miles before I start to hit the sweet spots. Along the few mile walk there, it looks like the beavers have been busy. You can tell as you approach the Burlington limestone alone by all the bits and pieces scattered along the nearby land. Today I decided to hunt the bank along the shore, and a layer about 10 feet above it. I have had good luck before finding some calyxs eroded out of the limestone by the waters edge, but the layer above requires splitting stone and further prep with air tools. All in all, I spent about 5 hours out fossil hunting. I've got about 75% of the finds cleaned up so far with the air scribe. Been cleaning as I go. A few of them still needs some scribe work, but I bagged a great variety! Species in the first picture. Crinoids: Azygocrinus rotundus, Uperocrinus pyriformis, Aorocrinus parvus, unknown species. Blastoids: Schizoblastus sayi Actinocrinites multiradiatus Very weathered Dorycrinus missouriensis (the famous 5 spined crinoid) Uperocrinus pyriformis Although the focus was on crinoids, I wanted to share my favorite piece of solitary and colonial corals found on the trip as well. I know some of you like pretty, sparkly corals. I like the crystalized caverns displayed in this one. And who doesn't like naturally exposed, colorful coral sections. That's all for this trip. I hope you all are able to get back out there, and enjoy yourselves and nature as soon as possible. Thanks for journeying along!
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