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Found 281 results

  1. Michigan Fossil ID

    This was found at Millennium Park near Grand Rapids, MI. I'm thinking Bryozoan?...but does anyone have an idea of species?
  2. Hello. I have still been going through boxes of mostly cave mineral from a large estate sale purchase, mostly consisting of cave minerals. The tags that remain are not attached to the pieces and usually scattered among many boxes. This amazing plate I found recently and believe I finally found the label. I just need justification. I haven't found any other plates like this one. It's stunning in person!
  3. Is This A Stromatoporoid?

    Hello, I found this rock in Alabama (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone) and have been trying to figure out what is all over it. After searching the forum and the internet, the closest match I could find is it possibly being a stromatoporoid, showing mamelons? If not, can anyone tell me what it might be? (My husband says it looks like melted plastic to him. I’m really hoping he isn’t correct. Lol) Thanks!
  4. Presumably, having been tumbled along the robustness of the Knob Creek's quartz bearing country rock of the Hoosier National Forest in the Bartlettsville (North Lawrence Co.) IN area, the tip of the Crown (Calyx) of this large Crinoid appears to have been sheered off at some point to give the observer a view (in crossection) of the inside of calyx which reveals absolutely nothing but Silica replacement of all internal parts. This sample is of the Harrodsburg Formation in the Sanders Group, Lower Middle Mississippian Time.
  5. Our new Shark Education Displays

    Pictures first, full descriptions will follow Paleozoic Sharks and “Sharks”
  6. Hash Plate I.D. Request

    Hi, I’m hoping someone will let me know which type of fossils are in this rock. I found it in Alabama. (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone) Thanks!
  7. A fossil hunt for. . . geodes?

    Sometimes, when you go on a fossil hunt, you find more than just fossils. Some friends and I traveled to southeastern Iowa in Spring '18 to scour the Mississippian for fossils, but while there, we noticed that many of the homes that we drove by sported geodes in their front yards. Intrigued, we decided to investigate for ourselves. As it turns out, the area is well-known for its geodes (Iowa's state rock is the geode), so we promptly decided that we had to collect some for ourselves. We eventually found a privately owned piece of property where we could fill a bucket with geodes for about $20, descended upon a stream cutting into the bedrock, and filled a bucket in short order. Then, on a return trip to Iowa a month later, we found another outcrop of geodes along the Mississippi River. Once again, we collected handfuls. Then, once we got back, we split them with a geode cracker. They varied in quality; some were stunningly beautiful, and others were less so. They were filled with all manner of minerals: some had chalcedony fillings; others had quartz crystals, and still others had minerals that I didn't recognize. The colors varied, too: pink, white, light blue, red, and brown. As it turns out, we were a little overzealous in our efforts; we collected about 50 pounds of rocks. We've given them away to as many friends would like them and have only just now run out of them a year later. Pictured below is a fraction of the haul. If you happen to find yourself in this neck of the woods, then remember: the Osagean of Iowa and Illinois has more than just crinoids. If you would like more information on them, where you can hunt for them, or even the annual Geode Fest, then check out this link. http://keokukiowatourism.org/geodes/index.php
  8. Hi again! Two more ID requests - this time they're from the Bangor Limestone in Alabama, USA (Lower Carboniferous, Mississippian). Specimen #1: An orthoconic nautiloid - could it be Brachycycloceras sp.? Specimen #2: A blastoid - Pentremites sp.? Thanks for your help! Monica
  9. Identification Request

    While out fossil hunting in Alabama (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone) earlier this week, I found a hash plate full of crinoid stem segments which also has a small fossil on it which I cannot identify. Is it a bryozoan?
  10. My fossil hunting friend came across this object in a creek in eastern Missouri. At first glance this ~1 cm diameter ball with stout spikes would seem to be some sort of camerate crinoid, but the spikes cover the entire surface, with no apparent place to put arms, column, mouth, or anus. (Side note: That must be the crinoid folksong community's version of "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes.") From there my fallback would be coral, or perhaps sponge, but the complete coverage around the whole sphere (see attached video) has me a bit baffled. The creek flows through mostly Meramecian (Visean) Mississippian bedrock, in particular the Salem Limestone. There is abundant chert, with common silicified fossils, which is what I believe this to be, though I have not examined it myself. Perhaps this is the internal mold of something? The chert bits I have seen from this creek, and from this region in general, are by and large not internal molds, but rather proper replacement fossils. I guess this oddity just has me reaching. Any thoughts with regard to identification would be most appreciated. video-1562025086_u3dNmuqY_sDVP.mp4
  11. mississippian fossilerous limestone

    Can anyone help me identify the vast array of specimens on this slab? I see some rugosa.
  12. The Crinoid Road Cut

    I don't get to go out fossil hunting as much as I would like these days, but I was able to sneak out to a local road cut for a few hours the other morning. It was the day before my birthday after all! A great excuse for me to convince the wife to watch the kiddos for a few hours. This particular road cut is dated to the Mississippian and is full of crinoids! I was literally walking over them. They were everywhere! Upon closer inspection I found that there were a couple of layers that were mainly composed of crinoids. This large slab was laying on the ground in front of the cut. The slab was almost 2 meters in length. Covered in crinoid fragments. Another large slab of crinoid infested rock. Again, it was on the ground in front of the cut. Yet another slab. I finally remembered to put something in for scale... A picture of what I am calling crinoid gravel. If you look closely you can see many crinoid fragments mixed in. This gravel was up a little higher on the cut. The road cut has multiple accessible levels. Here is a sample of some of the pieces I picked up. In my excitement, I started out picking up everything. Then I quickly realized that was an effort in futility. I thought the specimen at the very bottom right of the picture might have been a calyx when I first picked it up, but I think it may be a geode with a piece of crinoid attached. The largest of the "coin" looking columnals (third in the top row from left to right) is over an inch in diameter. With work being crazy, I haven't had a chance to go through everything and clean them up for a closer look. Sorry this photo isn't the best. It's late here and I'm trying to not wake up the family. Its the best I can do under sub par basement lighting. A very nice (and heavy!) hash plate that I was able to manhandle to the truck. Crinoids were not the only things I found. This horn coral was sticking up out of the rubble just waiting for me to come along and take it home! I like how it is coming up out of the matrix. Lording over its domain! lol I also came across bryozoan on occasion. The shale that they are in is very delicate and brittle. It's barely more than clay. I had to handle with care. Overall it wasn't a bad little outing. Any day out fossil hunting is a good day! I picked up much more, a few longer crinoid stems, a couple of small hash plates to practice prepping on, some geological items for my brother who is more into geology than paleontology. I ran into a few brachiopods, but most were not very well preserved or were badly weathered. Ill try to post a few more/better pictures as I go back through things and get them cleaned up a bit. I also have more pictures of the exposure and crinoid layers that I might post as well. Happy Hunting!
  13. I found this while searching for fossils in Alabama this week. Can anyone identify it for me? (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone)
  14. I am wondering which type of fossil I found. Is it a type of sponge? (Tuscumbia Limestone/Mississippian)
  15. Coral Identification

    Can anyone tell me which type of coral I have? (Tuscumbia Limestone/Mississippian)
  16. Is This A Fossilized Plant?

    I’m wondering if this is some type of fossilized plant fragment? If not, can anyone tell me what it might be? (Tuscumbia Limestone/Mississippian)
  17. Identification Request

    While searching for crinoids a few days ago, I found two items which I thought were especially interesting. Can anyone identify them for me? (Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone)
  18. I was given some Archimedes bryozoans and I was told they are from a Mississippian exposure somewhere in Alabama. I'm afraid that's all I know so far. They have a feature I'm not used to seeing. The only ones I have found consist of just the central axis support, or "screw." These do not show that part at all but they have just the outer edge of the fenestrated portion exposed the whole way around the specimen like this. Using only hand tools I started trying to expose the fronds to see if that is even possible and had some pretty good results. I will try to either saw or sand one of them down to see if I can expose the central axis and maybe prepare the other side like I'm doing this one. I can probably manage that part okay but exposing the edges is very tedious. I may have someone with air abrasion tools see if they can't do a better job than what I am managing. @Ptychodus04 ? Want to trade some labor for a couple of these?
  19. Greetings, all! I am currently writing a thesis involving fossils from the Burlington Limestone near its type section along the Illinois/Iowa border. To demonstrate the diversity of the crinoidal remains from the limestone (over 400 species have been described from the Burlington alone!), I am looking for photographs of articulated crinoids. Do any of you have any that you would like to let me include in my thesis? If possible, I would like high-res images of crinoids identified to genus or species with a scale bar/ruler present in the image as well as the collection/locality info. I can't guarantee that I will use every image posted, but if I use your image, then I will acknowledge you in my acknowledgements and give you credit for the image. Thank you for your time & assistance! -Elasmohunter
  20. Identification Request

    My husband found this while we were fossil hunting today. I’m hoping someone can identify it for me. The area is Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone.
  21. Tentaculite?

    My husband and I decided to go on a quick fossil hunt this morning. The area is Mississippian/Tuscumbia Limestone. I was delighted to find this small, square chunk of rock right away. It almost appears to be a shadow box for the lovely little fossil embedded within it. I am wondering if it is a tentaculite?
  22. Ameropiltonia Lauradanae

    From the album Trilobites

    A nice local trilobite, Ameropiltonia Lauradanae former known as Breviphillipsia Sampsoni. This is one of my favorite trilos that I can actually find in the home state. This one's a little over .6 inches in length. Carboniferous in age (Mississippian), and also comes from the Chouteau Formation of Saline County, MO.
  23. Ameropiltonia Lauradanae

    From the album Trilobites

    Another lovely Ameropiltonia Lauradanae. I recently this past week just traded this one to another fellow forum member @hrguy54. Well worth it! Hope he likes it as much as I did. Trilobite's origins is the Chouteau Formation, Sedalia MO. Around .6 inches in length.
  24. I got of Chicago a couple hours before the snow came today- This has been such a bad winter / spring in Chicago - last weekend it was 80. I digressed, back to fossils. Today with a nice temperature of 72 degrees, I did about 3 hours of collecting at the Anna and Vienna road cuts in southern Illinois. These Mississippian road cuts are conveniently located off of I-57 and 146 (Anna) and I-24 and 146 (Vienna). I first stopped at Anna- you can collect on each side of the road, but like many sites, you need to look closely to find fossils. Here are a couple pictures of how the fossils were found. Here are a couple pictures of the fossils that I found at Anna. Pentremities spicatus Blastoids/ I do not have my scale cube handy, so I used a standard pen. Horn Coral- Archimedes screw- Crinoid stems- (I only pick up these to show that they are present) Brachiopods- Vienna finds will be next-
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