Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'mollusks'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • The Crimson Creek
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Hey Everyone :P
  • fossil maniac's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholom√§, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 12 results

  1. Please ID bivalves

    Please ID species. Found it in Algarve, Portugal (miocene, I guess). I would also ask you to please advise me how to preserve it. Shall I varnish it? Thank you.
  2. Please ID mollusks

    Please ID species. Found it in Algarve, Portugal (miocene, I guess). I would also ask you to please advise me how to preserve it. Shall I varnish it? Thank you.
  3. Bunch of micro-mollusks

    Hi all, A handful of days ago there was a sand pile right in my neighborhood. Not sure why it was there, probably someone was making constructions to their house, but in any case I was happy. That's because that kind of sand comes straight from the North Sea, which is full of Eemian fossil sediments! So I took a little plastic bag and spent an hour or two looking in that pile of sand for fossils. The very common Eemian bivalves came up abundantly (so species like Mactra plistoneerlandica, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, Macoma balthica, etc), but that is not what I was too excited about. Seeing that the sand pile was rather small, it forced me to focus on just that little pile. Which is great, because therefore I actually started looking much more closely, and hereby also collecting tiny micro-fossils! Lots of gastropods, which is awesome because these are not as common as bivalves in these sediments. I namely found a complete yet puny Anomia ephippium, some very small Cerastoderma's, and also the ones attached. I would love to be able to bring these down to species level. So I am asking for your help! The Hague, Netherlands (from North Sea sediments) Eem Formation Eemian, Pleistocene; 120'000 y Thanks in advance, Max #1: Looks a little bit like Macoma balthica, but still a bit different... Very likely from the Tellinidae
  4. I am currently providing fossils for a project involving an advanced earth science class. In talking with the instructors, a few questions came up that I could not answer. 1. What caused brachiopods to crash and then pelecypods to flourish? 2. Are present day scallops pelecypods even though they look more like brachiopods?
  5. Thought I would share a few things that I collected during a short trip into the Waccamaw Formation in south eastern North Carolina on Saturday. We only spent about 2 and a half hours at the site but some really nice items were found. First a Melitta cf.M. aclinensis. Usually the sand dollars are found only as isolated pieces at this location, occasionally a whole one is found on matrix that is crushed and broken. However I found this complete unbroken one on matrix and another person found a complete unbroken one without matrix. I have started prepping this one out since the pic, it is coming along nicely. Another Melitta sp. I found. Cannot ID for sure as to species as it is broke, but complete and covered with matrix. Will also prep this one out as much as possible to try to ID to species. Next a block of matrix containing a rare Rhyncholampas sabistonensis echinoid. This is an irregular echinoid from the Pliocene / Pleistocene. I have found pieces of these before(and one today) but this is my first complete one. Even crushed and in poor shape I am happy with the find. Top of the matrix the echinoid itself and the bottom I am going to try and expose as much of this echinoid also. Without making it come apart. Double valve bivalves for the day .......
  6. James River Weekend - VA

    Mrs. SA2, @MikeR & I guided a trip for 12 along the lower James River in Virginia this weekend. Started out with very iffy weather Saturday morning with 2 foot swells and white caps from an unfriendly westerly wind. She and I were both quite busy tending our boats even when on the beach so we didn't get many photos. Mike was busy helping the folks with IDs and stratigraphy, so he didn't get many either. There were some taken though. Later in the day we did find a very nice, large Eastover Formation slough (upper Miocene). @Fossil-Hound Mrs. SA2 said she "had the feeling" as we approached in the boats. Not to disappoint, the slough produced at least 10 Ecphora between the different members of the group, most were whole or almost whole. @Daleksec still has hold of the lucky horseshoe and found about 6 foot of whale jaw. (After initial inspections last night it appears to be 3 foot of both sides of the lower jaw / mandible. Lots of further work is required.) I will post more photos of Saturday in next couple days. Today was much nicer on the river and we hunted a section of beach with the Rushmere Member of the Yorktown Formation (Upper Pliocene) in the bottom 2 - 3 feet of the cliff. It's very shelly and it too produced large #s of Ecphora. @Fossil-Hound, I'm not exaggerating when I say the group got over 20 on the day, cause I found Mrs. SA2 7 by myself, she found a couple, @Daleksec had 4 or 5 and other members of the group had some too. Here is a photo of my 1st of today, lying there waiting to pose with 2 of @aerogrower's custom scale cube. We were testing out the metric one to make sure Ray put some magic in it. Here is a photo showing the Rushmere Member exposure at the base of the cliff. We had about 600 yards of exposure today. Paleo pick for scale. Here is a photo of my last Ecphora of the day. @Fossil-Hound, calm down. YES, it really is "that big!" @MikeR can vouch for it, he saw it and photographed it, with his brand new metric scale from @aerogrower. Obviously, I have some prep work ahead of me. Speaking of the world famous @MikeR, ladies and gentlemen - here he is coming back to the boat with his bucket of trophies after a few hours in the sun! One of the nicest, most knowledgeable guys you would ever want to meet. I'll post photos of all of Mrs. SA2'S Ecphora from the weekend, @Daleksec's jaw and his gorgeous ~2 inch hastalis with red hues in the next few days. Gorgeous tooth! Cheers, SA2
  7. This past weekend Dozer Operator and I made a trip to a favorite locality near Lake Okeechobee which exposes both the Lower Pleistocene Caloosahatchee and the Middle Pleistocene Bermont Formations. Hurricane Mathew had grazed the Florida Peninsula the previous week so we were optimistic that the prodigious rains would have washed the sediments revealing marine goodies as well as some terrestrial vertebrate material. Jonathan came away with some nice horse teeth and I picked more Siphocypraea than I can ever use. My finds of the day included a pair of rare Morum oniscus from the Bermont and maximum sized Turbinella scolymoides from the Caloosahatchee.
  8. James River Chesapectens

    From the album Recent Finds in VA

    Name: Chesapecten jeffersonius Formation: Yorktown / Rushmere Member Age: Pliocene Location: James River, Surry County, VA, right bank, near Cobhams Wharf
  9. Marine Jurassic Finds

    Been diggin again,this is what i have come up with this time. I have read that they are termed generally as "Mollusks".It states bivalves and ammonites fall within this general term. Are they both of the same family?? thanks.
  10. Mystery Mollusk / Cephalopod Fossils ?

    Unfortunately I have no location/formation info about this fossil at all, but I'm hoping someone will recognize these. The largest of the three is on the left, about 4 cm. wide. The one on the right is about 3.5 cm. Any thoughts? Thanks for your help!!
  11. Please visit the Olividae and Olivellidae LifeDesk, containing a wealth of information on extinct as well as living representatives of these two families of marine gastropods. Have fun! Ron
  12. Bivalves From Deer Lake

    Here are three large bivalve internals from our recent Deer Lake trip - I think some of the details are especially interesting - not sure what the ID would be for this but there are quite a few of these at the site, which is Mahantango: BIVALVE 1 - assume the closeup is a preserved pedicle: BIVALVE 2 - note the detail of the scalloped section along the edge in the second photo BIVALVE 3 This is the underside of a third bivalve internal - note the interesting structures/patterns:
×