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Found 128 results

  1. Fossil bone/tooth, Bison? (NL)

    Found this large fossil tooth at the Kaloot beach, The Netherlands while looking for fossil shark teeth. Tried cross referencing it to the local database and I think it might be a European Bison...but I'm not sure. Maybe some of you guys can ID it! It's about 10-12 cm tall (rough estimate), two deep grooves on top. Bottom is hollow. Quite worn, you can see the internal bone structure in several places. Sides are smooth. Would love to hear what you guys think!
  2. van Keulen, P. and Rhebergen, F., 2017. Typology and fossil assemblage of Sandbian (Ordovician) 'baksteenkalk': an erratic silicified limestone of Baltic origin from the northeastern Netherlands and adjacent areas of Germany. Estonian Journal of Earth Sciences, 66(4), pp.198-220. Link to open access PDF file Winterman, W., 1990. Baksteenkalk. Grondboor & Hamer, 44(1), pp.11-13. Rhebergen, F., 2001. Trilobieten in noordelijke zwerfstenen in Nederland. GEA, 34(3), pp.39-43. Rhebergen, F., 1993. Ordovicische zwerfstenen in het Twents-Duitse grensgebied. Grondboor en Hamer, 47, pp.132-140. Yours, Paul H.
  3. Nice bird bone from the Zandmotor

    Hi everyone! Last week I found this nice, rather big, bird bone on the Zandmotor (Netherlands). It is most likely late Pleistocene in Age (Weichselian) but could possibly be older (though I doubt this is any older than early Pleistocene, given the conservation). I believe it to be a femur of a rather large species of bird. My first thought was the great auk, Pinguinus impennis, but I think my bone is probably not sturdy/thick enough for such a heavy bird. I'm currently thinking it might be something like a large sea gull, but this is just guess work, and birds are definitely not my area of expertise. What do you guys think it might be? Also, if any of you has some kind of free identification guide/paper for bird bones (modern/fossil), could you please share it? I'll already tag @Auspex and @MarcoSr as I remember that you two have worked with bird bones before Thanks in advance for your help! Max
  4. Ice Age & erratics in Lathum

    Hey guys! This hunt was on more than a month ago, on the 18th of July, but I haven't had time to make a trip report till today. Better late than never! In late June I invited my good friend Tijn ( @Hunter0811) to come hunt with me at the Zandmotor, and then come to my place to see my whole collection, and we had a great time talking about all things fossil-related. That evening he told me about a new location he had discovered near his house in the east of the Netherlands which also had Ice Age mammal bones, and so we made plans to meet up again soon, but this time over there, so that we could check this new place out together. He picked me up at the train station and we biked to the place. The weather was nice, although maybe just a bit too warm, but sunny and good for fossil hunting. We had to cross a small field with cows to get to the place after parking our bikes, and they were curious to see what we were doing so they approached us to say hi. The site is near a village called Lathum. It's quite literally a big pile of rocks: gravel with lots of erratic stones, all dredged from the bottom of a nearby pond. The hunting there consists of just looking in between the stones.
  5. Some recent Zandmotor finds

    Hey everyone! Hope everyone's doing alright during this stressful situation! I haven't been too active on TFF (or with fossils in general) the past few months (mostly due to school work), but with the whole virus situation I suddenly have some more free time. The Netherlands aren't currently under strict quarantine, but schools are closed, and we're firmly recommended to stay at home and forbidden to go out in groups of more than 3. But, luckily fossil hunting is still possible, so after a long winter hiatus I finally went back to the Zandmotor (last time was when I found that mammoth tooth in October!), not once, but twice (Tuesday 17th from 11 to 6, and Sunday 22nd from 2 to 4 about). Nothing very eventful happened during either of the trips, so I'm not gonna make a whole trip report, but just show you some nice location pictures and some of the most interesting or rarer finds. What I will however mention is that the beach has changed a lot since the last time I was there, especially when considering where certain dunes, elevated parts or shell banks were located. In fact, the change between Tuesday and Sunday was impressive too. Crazy what wind and erosion are capable of!
  6. Hello everyone, Yesterday my girlfriend & I went fossil hunting for birthday. This was the first fossil hunt the two of us did on our self, our previous hunts were all excursions with the Belgian Association for Paleontology. We visited two locations, but locations are part of the Formation of Gulpen, around 68 million years old, dating back to the Maastrichtian (these outcrops are part of the Maastrichtian type location where the first mayor Mosasaurus discovery was done). The first location we visited was a limestone outcrop next to the Albert Channel here in Belgium, only a 20 minute drive away. I discovered this outcrop while looking out the window whenever I drive to Maastricht and yesterday we decided to check it out. It is quite a little outcrop, no more than 70 meters wide, but one of the few places left where you can hunt in Limburg. We hunted here for around one and a half hour and we only searched the fallen and loose bits of limestone that were the results of erosion. We didn't want to start hacking in the rock. We mainly found ancient sea shells of different species and some bryozoa's in this location. And a some pieces of wall where teeming with urchin fragments, but we didn't find any intact one near the surface. But since the urchin graveyard was deeply enbedded in the rock and we didn't want to hack in it, we left it as it was The second location we visited was the "Grote Bos" in Beutenaken in The Netherlands. Here there are holloways in the forest that expose some limestone outcrops. This spot is known for it's belemnite which can be found on the forest paths, because the soft limestone gets eroded but hard belemnites remain, making them very easy to find. We found around 25 belemnites during our 1 hour hunt there as well as a shell imprint and a mystery fossil. Like the previous location, the patch of limestone where these belemnite can be found is also only around 70 meter long, but luckily very rich.
  7. additions to knowledge:Cretaceous Fish

    A new species of dercetid (Teleostei,Aulopiformes) from the type Maastrichtian of southern Limburg, the Netherlands Jonathan J.W. Wallaard, René H.B. Fraaije, Henk J. Diependaal and John W.M. Jagt Netherlands Journal of Geosciences, Volume 98, e2. wallaapiscrdnew_species_of_dercetid_teleostei_aulopiformee_type_maastrichtiasouthern_limbure_netherlands.pdf
  8. Hey everyone! On Wednesday, as I finally had some time, I decided to take Sara out to my favorite hunting spot: the Zandmotor (Netherlands). I definitely did not regret that decision! If you've never heard of the Zandmotor before, it's an artificial beach extension just south of The Hague, and the sand that was used was dredged from the North Sea and is full of Ice Age megafaunal mammal bones and tons of Eemian shells. If you want to see some more of my finds and hunts there, just look up "Zandmotor" in the TFF search bar and you should find a bunch of stuff When we got there it was raining, which annoyed me a little bit because the forecast said it wouldn't... The rain also makes the sand stick to the fossils which can become annoying when looking for small fossils or trying to recognize the thing you just picked up. But, having just spent an hour in the bus to get here, I didn't want to turn back immediately. Luckily the rain stopped within half an hour, and I wasn't even on the Zandmotor yet (I have to walk about an hour from the bus stop to the Zandmotor itself) and after that the weather alternated between cloudy and sunny which was nice. While I usually always take a pass by the shell banks, today I decided to only walk along the shoreline to increase the chances of finding good mammal stuff. In fact, there had been a strong eastern wind on Tuesday which helped uncover a lot of the bones and make them wash ashore. This did not go unnoticed, there were a lot indeed! Here is my first big find of the day, a great complete horse astralagus!
  9. Vertebra id

    Besides of the tooth and several other bones I also found some this vertebra: I am really not sure if its a mammal vert or something. Is it even fossil? I have my doubts.... Its from the area of Ijmuiden (Netherlands), so its probably from the Holocene. Can anybody help on the id? Again perhaps @LordTrilobite or @Harry Pristis ?
  10. Mammal tooth id

    Hi guys, I found this mammal tooth a while ago at the Zandmotor near Den Haag in the Netherlands. You can find there fossils from the Quaternary period. The tooth is about 2 cm long and the crown is quite damaged. Looks a bit like a very small woolly rhino tooth but I am really not sure. Can anybody help me? Maybe @Harry Pristis or @LordTrilobite ? Here is the tooth:
  11. Mammal tooth

    Long time, since I last time posted anything.. Well, here is something I stumbled upon while walking on the (beautiful) dunes near Amsterdam. It clearly is a tooth and I somewhat am confident it about being either some cow or bison, (upper??) molar. I have been second guessing it being an fossil afterall, and would like to get another opinions of it. In my eyes, bottom side looks more like rock than bone with rootcanals..
  12. Found in shell beds in the south of the netherlands, can anyone identify these fragments for me? I found 3 different bone fragments (?) which i will upload. 1/3
  13. Bryozoan? From the Banjaard

    Hi everyone, Here's a cool little thing I found on the Banjaard beach (Zeeland, Netherlands) last month. I believe it's a type of bryozoan? If so, what species? Apart from the mollusks, the invertebrates are really not my strong point... The age of this thing is probably (anywhere in the) Pleistocene, but possibly older (up to Eocene). It might be modern too... The most common sediments at this location are Eemian (warm interglacial stage in the late Pleistocene) in age. This specimen was found in a bed of lots of tiny Lacuna vincta shells, if that helps. Thanks in advance, Max
  14. Bone pieces from the Banjaard

    Hi everyone, Here are 3 bone pieces I found last month on the Banjaard beach in the Netherlands. Not sure what any of these are. Their age is most likely Pleistocene, but it could also be Pliocene. Both terrestrial and marine are possible. Let me know if any of these remind you of anything! Thanks in advance, Max Bone #1:
  15. Amazing hunt at the Banjaard

    Hi everyone, I'm really late on this one, but better late than never! On the 6th of April I went to the Banjaard beach again, and although our hunt was short it was super interesting! I started off by searching the coastline, where I found lots of bivalves such as Tridonta borealis, Mya truncata, Mytilus edulis, Arctica islandica, etc. After a while I went higher up the beach and started looking for the gastropod shell banks we had a lot of luck at last time. Unfortunately I didn't manage to find them... which tells me that the banks come and go, and that that previous hunt was just really lucky. However we got lucky again this time, by finding another type of shell bank! This giant 'cloud' you see here yielded a crazy amount of smaller rare fossils!
  16. Hi everyone, Not last Wednesday, but the one before that one, I went to the Zandmotor again for a hunt, and it went well! As soon as I went down on the beach (I was still in the Kijkduin area, not yet on the Zandmotor), so only some 5 minutes or so into the hunt, I found this little ugly thing in the sand: It's a small (slightly incomplete) mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) lamella! It's from the late Pleistocene, some 40'000 years ago. It's nowhere as nice as the previous one I found, but this one's cool too. Still happy to have found it because lately I've really been on a dry spell when it comes to the mammal stuff, so hopefully this is a sign that I'm gonna find some more again. After that, I continued hunting for some 4 hours or so, until the rain chased me away. The weather, although sunny at first, was really not great because there was a lot of wind. This made it a bit colder, but more annoyingly there was sand going everywhere. At some point I was checking out a little sand cliff for some shells, but had to turn my back immediately because the sand was going in my eyes. Also, the 'wich' part of my sandwich became essentially irrelevant... I did make some cool fossil shells finds though:
  17. Hi all, This weekend, after the long, boring and annoying winter months (it's always mildly cold, but very windy and rainy in the Netherlands in winter... horrible fossil hunting conditions) spring finally let out the tip of its nose, with a nice sun, blue sky and decent temperature. About time! We all know what this means... time to do some fossil-hunting! So on Sunday morning I woke up, prepared my fossil hunting equipment (mainly bags and boxes; no tools needed for this beach), made myself a lunch, and set out at 13:00 to the bus. The bus ride to Kijkduin takes me about an hour, so I arrived at the beach at 14:06. But, as usual, because it's by bus I'm not dropped off at the ideal spot, so I have to walk about an hour on the beach, due south-west, to actually get to the Zandmotor. But that wasn't much of a problem... this part of the beach already has a few fossils to yield, although not as many, so you can start the fossil hunting right away. Didn't find anything significant though in that first stretch. You're literally walking on lots of Eemian fossil shells, but these species are all very common. Spisula solida, Cerastoderma edule, C. glaucum, and Macoma balthica are just not worth picking up, unless it's a specimen that stands out to me (unusual size, pathologies, weird colors, etc). Here's a map to better illustrate the places I will mention. Note that it's approximate. Also, the sand cliffs and the shell banks often move around, we are after all on a beach with lots of wind and water movement, so these positions aren't defined. But this is what was the case this weekend. And the pink Zandmotor "limit" isn't accurate either, it's more my view as in "this is good fossil-hunting territory". By the way, that red S is where the bus drops me off. Oh, and that big puddle in the middle of the beach is actually a very popular kite-surf spot, especially for amateurs because there are no waves. This time I started off the hunt at the "sand cliffs" as I like to call them, (2m tall at the highest point, so not real cliffs), then went on to an area more to the south of the Zandmotor (at the bottom of the dark blue line on the map). It was my first time properly hunting that little area, and it turns out it's actually a good spot, I found lots of good bivalve fossils there! After an hour or two I sat down to eat my lunch (yes, a very late lunch, but time flies by when you're fossil hunting! I'm actually still surprised I remembered to eat my lunch at all, I usually get so caught up in the hunt that I often just completely forget to eat my lunch at all ), then went onto the richest part of the Zandmotor when it comes to shells, the..... (drumroll please)............. shell banks! I know, very unexpected! The real Eemian shell banks are usually lying on the north-center of the Zandmotor, between the cliffs and the shoreline. That is when I made my two favorite finds of the day: a gorgeous Propebela turricula, and a bit later, Gari fervensis! After a total of about 5 hours hunting, I decided it was time to get back home, so I called it a day. But man was it a good day! I found an incredible diversity of fossil shells, especially bivalves. Onto some pictures, starting with some location pics.
  18. Shark tooth from Nieuwvliet

    Hi all, Here’s a cool little shark tooth I got from a super nice lady during the fossil fair in Harderwijk last weekend. She found it on the beach of Nieuwvliet-Bad in Zeeland (Netherlands). I’m trying to ID it but having some trouble doing so... looks most like a Striatolamia macrota but the shape of the tip of the crown seems off, and mine doesn’t have any cusps (and doesn’t appear to have had cusps now worn off either). Anyone have an idea? The tooth’s age is ambiguous, from Pliocene to early Eocene (all ages are found on the beaches of Zeeland), but seeing that she mostly found Eocene species nearby (ie Otodus auriculatus) this is one has a slightly higher chance of being Eocene too. Thanks in advance! Max
  19. Yesterday I made a visit to the Natural History Museum of Maastricht (The Netherlands) for my Birthday The museum is only a 40 minute drive from where I live and it showcases the entire natural history of the region, the cool thing about this museum is that the fossils which are showcased here are all regional fossils from The Netherlands, Germany & Belgium. I am starting the topic off with 2 pictures of the special exhibit called Microsculptures, which shows giant detailed photographs of insects to show how magnifecent they are. Then I went on to the "Mosaleum" which holds "Bér" the holotype specimen of Prognathodon saturator
  20. Hey guys, I’m heading to Raalte in The Netherlands for a family trip and wanted to know what the fossil/artifact scene is there and if there are any spots you all would recommend! I’d love to bring home some European fossils
  21. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-01/uob-fdi011419.php
  22. Hi everyone! For those of you who live in or close to the Netherlands: on the 9th of March 2019, the PaleoTime-NL International Fossil Show will be held again, this year in the town of Harderwijk, The Netherlands. This show is the biggest paleontological event in the Netherlands, a meeting between amateur and professional paleontologists, for the exchange of knowledge, experiences and fossils. There are informative lectures, prep demo's and many more activities. Entrance is free. For more information, see the website www.paleotime.nl/en Is anyone of you guys going? Cheers, Johan
  23. Hi everyone, My last hunt of 2018 was incredible. And quite surprising too! For Xmas, we went to Middelburg in Zeeland to visit my mother's family, which is always a huge load of fun for me because I get to hang out with all my cousins, that I don't see very often. Anyways, one of the days, they all wanted to do a big walk on one of the beaches. At first they wanted to go to Dishoek, but I managed to convince them to go to the Banjaard instead. Once arrived, we split into 2 groups: one was my mother, my eldest cousin (18), my 2nd-youngest cousin (6), and I. All the rest went to the other group. The other group just walked, but our little group did something much more interesting... You guessed it: fossil hunting! As soon as we got onto the beach, we almost immediately found our first fish vertebra, but after that we seemed to have hit a small dry spell for nothing really worthy was being found. A few common fossil bivalves here and there, but nothing more. For my two cousins, it was their first time fossil hunting, and we had to give them a few examples to show them what to look for. I told them to focus on the fish vertebrae, because these were the easiest to recognize. The smaller one also did a lot of shell-hunting on her own, always picking up the most colorful ones and saying this one was Mama shell, this one Papa shell, this one Sister, etc until she made one giant family of orange shells Then after about an hour or two of hunting with rather little success, we finally hit these little shell banks on the beach. And there, BINGO! Gastropod after gastropod, we couldn't stop finding an incredible amount of them. On the Dutch shores, fossil (and modern too) gastropods are generally much less common than fossil bivalves. So the amount we found here was very surprising!
  24. My Small fossil collection

    Hi Nicky here! This is my small fossil collection which I started since I was 10 and expanded it when I was 18 If you have questions or have any suggestions for me please feel free to ask/tell My collection This is a overview of what I have. This is one of my favourites, the Spinosaurus I loved the creature when I first saw him in Jurassic park 3 and ever since it is one of my favourite carnivores! Carcharodon, A pretty tooth in my opinion. One of my newer tooth that I got, It is not specified what Kind of raptor it is but maybe you guys know? It's the smallest tooth that I currently own! Mosasaurus, one of the first teeth that I got and It is in my collection for a very long time. Plesiosaurus, This tooth is pretty cool in my opinion since it comes from the plesiosaurus which I find to be a very interesting reptile. Megalodon, Yes you read that right! a very bad condition meg tooth but never the less I find the unique look very cool. Otodus Obliquus, I fell in love when I saw the tooth and how it was stuck in the stone. Dalpiazia Stromeri, A tooth I got because it was one of the prey that the spinosaurus hunted on so I needed this one! Flexicalymene Retrorsa, My first trilobite and a cool looking one as well! Leptolepis, I found this fossil but I do not know allot about this creature so if you guys know more please tell me! Atlasaurus imelaki, Also a dinosaur that I do not know allot about but this piece was very cool. Oviraptor eggshell and a titanosauria eggshell, I always wanted a piece of a dinosaur egg so I got two shells! Mammoth hair and Amber with an insect, Cool things to own in my opinion. Dinosaur bone fragments, I picked these up on my trip in the USA when I was 10 good memories of visiting that shop :D. Ammonite, A small piece of ammonite which looked pretty cool to pick up. Whale ear, I got this from the same guy that gave me the Megalodon tooth in spain. Big ammonite, It is 40 cm in diameter and weights 14 kg this big ammonite is a big piece of my collection! Those were my fossils I got big plans to get more and bigger!
  25. @Linus told me a wonderful story about treasuring precious times with the people you love... whether or not you find what you think you are looking for. I immediately realized I had another similar, WONDERFUL stone. It appears to be “chock full” of interesting flora and fauna! @Linus, I truly hope this is also a Skanör fossil!
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