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Found 14 results

  1. Help ID with large structure

    Found along the Fundy coast in New Brunswick, Canada. In an area called Rockport. The stone in which this structure is encased is approximately 60cm by 40cm. It would be in the "BP" area of the map I posted. Is this a fossil? and if so, of what? Thank you for looking.
  2. Dorchester Cape (July 2018)

    I hadn't blogged in a while, but here's my latest excursion (I have more but I'll have to dig up the information, and some are still pending field work/research) On July 5th I went for a drive down Beaumont, in the Memramcook region in South-Eastern New Brunswick (Canada), to check how bad the road along the coast had eroded with time since the last time I went down there rock picking. I stopped in a few places to check on the rocks down the beach wherever I could go down, and spotted the cliffs of Dorchester Cape across the Memramcook river. Hopped in the car and proceeded to make the short few kilometers trek to the other side. Location indicator shows Dorchester Cape on the map (Google Maps) Location of the cliffs The geology of the area is mostly formed of Upper Carboniferous rocks, and the location I was at is mostly Boss Point formation. The Boss Point formation is also found in Cape Enrage, Rockport, and Upper Joggins, to name a few places. The fossils that I find at the Dorchester Cape site is mostly discombobulate plant material, with dark grey to tan sandstones with some sandy conglomerate boulders lying about. Chunks of gypsum and some Albertite can be seen on the beach, as evaporites abound in the Albert Mines area, and some other unspecified locations in the Memramcook area. Albertite, and then gypsum, were an important part of the local economy, especially in Hillsborough across the river, as the geology of the surrounding area sees large deposits of various evaporites, a relic of the ancient Windsor Sea which would have receeded, giving way to vast forests and rivers. But what was most important for Dorchester Cape was the copper found in the sedimentary rocks. This copper ore, chalcocite, was discovered in the late 1860s and mined until all operations came to a stop before the First Great War. Dorchester Copper Mine. K. Vanderwolf. New Brunswick Museum. From Memramcook, I drove down the 106 towards Dorchester. Once in the village, you take the 935, which is Cape Road, heading towards Dorchester Cape. The road turns into a dirt road about 2 clicks after the train tracks. Turn into the dirt road across the Atlantic Industries Limited business site. Make your way down the road, avoiding pot holes and man made roadblocks, and you'll eventually reach the old wharf. Make your way South (left of the wharf) and head towards the cliffs near Cole Point. Looking back, view of Fort Folly Point slicing Shepody Bay. As we get closer to the rock cliffs, you can already spot coal and petrified wood on the beach. The plant fossils are mostly fragmented, showing signs of turbulence. There's some micro faulting in some places, and large sections of the cliffs are coming down in large segments. Plastered with plants/tree parts (hat for scale) The beach is littered with petrified wood, plant fossils, and chunks of coal. Middle section replaced with orange calcite crystals Some pieces are quite large (dirty hat for scale) Common theme: plants sticking out to catch some Sun One of the few holes where trees used to lie in situ The cliffs have coal seams that can reach a few inches thick. Tree imprint Nice tree sticking out (squished hat for scale) Close to the tree NOT sand (chances of lithification?)
  3. I have a box of some freebie fossil plant publications to give away. Mostly Maritimes. And a few others on western USA and the Arctic. Includes paleobotany textbook. Free to anyone in the Nova Scotia or New Brunswick in the Maritimes who has a current interest in the subject or studying the local stratigraphy. Decent condition but used. Please, personal message only. If you dont hear back, box is taken.
  4. Sussex Field Work (2015)

    Sussex is an interesting region in terms of geology and paleobiology. An amalgamation of different formations crisscrossing the larger Moncton Basin, this area was the target of study by local and foreign interests. Sussex is known for its potash mines, but one shouldn't forget the importance of the rich fossil localities doting the region. One such discovery was probably evidence of Canada's oldest forest, which is of significance. Matt Stimson, along with other professionals in the field, did some work in the area. I've had the chance to assist on occasion in a few field trips. The work done in this region is still ongoing and soon to be published. This time around we decided to target an area I've never gone or attempted to go yet. I'm used to quarries, but this time we would be spending the day at a road cut. Me and my braids Matt getting ready It was a few days after the Christmas holidays so it was kinda cold. The wind was nippy but we were lucky that ice hadn't formed yet on the ledges and that snow hadn't blanketed the area. The day started kinda grey but by the afternoon, the Sun had come out. It was a welcome event as the wind was freakin' cold. We made our way to the center cut. Traffic wasn't much of a factor as you can see cars coming from miles away, and plenty of space to park my car off the road. Area of Research: The rocks here are comprised of several units of interbedding sandstones and mudstones. Within these units, some several meters thick, are shale layers. Within these layers are indications of both plant and aquatic biota. Traces of fish material, scales, teeth, bone, are contained in some of the layers, forming some small limestone lenses and strata. Other areas along the cut feature plants. In all this mix, there are trackways. The work in the area is ongoing so all the data hasn't surfaced yet until publication sees the day. The cut showed signs of faulting, backed by folding. This looked promising We found many invertebrate trackways such as diplichnites and rusophycus. Most were very well preserved, even though exposed to the elements. From traces to scales and teeth, the record showed a high level of activity, condensed. The work goes on. We reached a spot where we encountered plants. I don't remember if these were referenced or cataloged previously. The preservation was fair, and we were able to find a good number of specimens. The New Brunswick Museum lab will have new specimens to work on by the end of the day. One of many specimens Root system Plant specimen showing shoot/stem and leaves We've covered only a small portion of the area. Different zones have been targeted for future study. Having done work for the past Summers, I can see why Sussex and its surrounding localities have been visited. The amount of fossils in the around is astounding, especially when talking about trackways. The work continues... - Keenan
  5. Hey there! I know I know, I've been missing in action for the past few months. Work and Field work kept me busy. But I've now am taking the time to update my blog, and sharing some of my recent adventures. This one is not so much of a fossil hunting trip, but of discovery on fossil history in New Brunswick. A few weekends ago I went for a day trip to Saint John to meet up with my friend Matt at the New Brunswick Museum's Steinhammer Lab. He's currently doing a stint at the research facility and I couldn't resist, desperately wanting to tour this historic place. This building was the original New Brunswick Museum until it needed more space to accommodate a growing collection. In the 1990s, the exhibition displays found a new home downtown (Market Street area), but most of its collection (closed to the public) was kept at the original building on Douglas Avenue. This museum is considered Canada's oldest, housing collections dating back to its first proprietor, Abraham Gesner. The influence of the Steinhammer Club, comprised of geologists from the area and abroad, was pivotal in the history of Geology across the globe. They founded the Natural History Society of New Brunswick, and from there the contributions to science have been crucial to the advancement of several fields. I had also wanted to meet up again with Dr. Randall Miller, curator of the collections and museum, but he was currently out of town. I arrived at the old museum in one piece after dodging a hellish traffic and weird road designs. Beautiful city, crappy roads. Matt making sure Steve is hard at work I got to the museum and after talking to the wonderful staff, I met up with Matt and one other friend, Steve. Steve is an amazing fella and will keep you on your toes. They were in the middle of taking specimens collected in recent field work (a couple that I've participated in) and offered to lend a hand. We unloaded the material to the lab, and headed out for a bite to eat. After parting ways with Steve as he headed back to Fredericton, we proceeded in taking a tour of the Steinhammer Palaeontology Lab. I didn't take any pictures as Randy wasn't around and didn't want to take any just in case he didn't approve. Going through the collection, I've seen some incredible representations of various paleobiological and paleobotanical specimens, including many type specimens. Trilobites, which a cast of one of the biggest I've ever seen barely fit in the collection cabinet. Eurypterids, or sea scorpions, that could give you nightmares, were the size of your average family dog. Fish, bones, and even the remains of a wooly mammoth (Mastodon) graced the collection. This animal was collected from the Hillsborough area, near where I live. The tusks were incredible to behold. Walking through the halls, it was easy to get lost amidst the many artifacts laying around, beckoning, hungry for your attention. Even going to the washrooms you have to pass a wall of jars, each filled with animals living, and extinct. One doesn't linger too long in the bathroom let me tell ya. Also among the specimens at the lab were the many trackways that we collected, waiting to be analyzed and studied. Seeing specimens that you helped bring up in the light of day and residing in this place was quite a special feeling. As the day winded down, me and Matt chatted about the importance of keeping collections together, and the crucial role that these play. Every effort must be made to help save these as they help us understand our past and help dictate a future most rich. Our friend Margaret arrived near the end of my stay. As we said our goodbyes, I felt that it was imperative that I participate in the discovery and safekeeping of fossils, and to contribute in the advancement in the fields surrounding those of paleontology and biology. That is why I love geology, as it makes me have an intimate rapport with science, to which I love and am passionate to no end. To understand and comprehend, wonder even for what nature has left in our path, often hidden, for us to uncover and rediscover. Cheers! - Keenan Saint John River, view from behind the museum
  6. Clifton, New Brunswick (2013)

    Taken from blog post http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/06/clifton-new-brunswick-2013.html During my vacation, I made a day trip to Clifton, in northern New Brunswick. I've been to that location last year and made some interesting finds, including some nice ferns. This trip wasn't as fruitful as I had hoped, but I managed to take photos of the numerous trees in situ (surprised by the number present) and the drive in itself was nice. Always be mindful of the tides when you venture down these beaches as you could get trapped with not many ways out. Getting my stuff together Where most of the trees are found Tree #1 - Bottom section (walking stick for scale, 1 meter long) Tree #2 - Tree with roots going through various layers Close-up of 'Tree #2' Tree #3 Tree #4 (zoomed in on right) What would have been 'Tree #5' One of the very few plants I've come across (sparse this year) Tree #6 with broken section on the beach Close-up of 'Tree #6' Tree segments Tree #7 Photo of 'Tree #7' taken the previous year It ended up to be a great day to be on the beach. The morning was gloomy but by the time I was done, the Sun had come out and I ended up enjoying the walk. I'll probably make this a yearly trek to see how the bay shapes the cliffs of Clifton and what could potentially come out. Till next time! - Keenan
  7. Snowy Cape Enrage (Cap Enragé)

    From my blog: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/cape-enrage-in-february.html In February I got hit by a bad bug, a flu that knocked my on the floor for a week. Being sick for a few days had sapped a lot of energy and it was driving me nuts. The forecast had called for a sunny and warmer weekend, so I told myself that I had to make an attempt to get out of the house and get some fresh air. That Saturday did indeed turn out to be a sunny and warmer one, so I hopped in my Volkswagen Rabbit and decided to go for a drive South towards Alma. I drove down Riverside-Albert and decided to head towards Cape Enrage. The roads were somewhat in fair conditions when I reached the Cape Enrage road. It was plowed to a certain section and then abruptly stops after the 90 degree bend close to Waterside Beach where I had spent quite some time doing stratigraphy. The road were snow covered but barely an inch in thickness, BUT what could have made my trip short was the steep hill I had to drive up to get to my destination. There was a whole whack of tracks of many failed attempts to get up the hill, but I was confident my bunny was able to do it. After a few kicks and the car traction kicking in a few times, I was able to make it to the top! I drove a few hundred meters then turned around and chose a parking spot. I was proud that my car made it to the top, but I didn't want to risk driving down the hill on the other side where the snow was thicker and more packed. There was a single set of tire tracks from what looked like a 4x4 vehicle, with spots along the road where it apparently struggled to make it up. From the car it took me about 30 minutes to get to the beach. The only sound I heard was the wind, the snapping of branches, and the crunching of snow with each step I took. All around me were fresh animals tracks of all sorts: foxes, mice, rabbits, birds, all criss-crossing the road. Bunny! (or Hare) By the time I reached the beach, I was sweating and feeling it. The Sun was beating on me and I was still not feeling 100%, but I was glad to have made it this far. I walked down the beach and towards the East cliff section. I strolled about at the foot of the cliff to see if there was anything that had come loose but surprisingly, nothing. Nothing had really changed since last fall, and that was a little disappointing. But the matter of fact is, I was happy to have come here and recharge my batteries. I had never seen this area under snow and it was very nice, very serene, with only the waves and the wind for sound. I'll be back in the area soon but on the other side West of here to find any changes in the local topography. Who knows, there might be more trackways waiting to be found.
  8. My Blogspot =P

    Since there's a section for sites, here's mine: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/ Cheers! -Keenan
  9. Hey guys. I've been adding threads to the forum from some of my older posts from my blog detailing treks I've made in the past to highlight some of the sites, popular and new, in the Maritimes. When I joined I was surprised there were no posts at all from the Maritimes. Since the past few nights I've been converting my posts from my own personal blog here. If you have any questions about the sites or would like to know about sites and locations that you don't see in those sections, let me know and I can probably give you some info. I've been doing some heavy reading all year about site scouting in the Maritimes and its nuts what's out there and documented. Cheers!
  10. [Taken from my blog October 2011 - http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] A few weeks ago I had mentionned to my friend Matt that I would have loved to find the elusive fossil fish in the Albert Mines area. I had gone a few times to check the area but still couldn't really find anything of interest except a few pieces of Albertite (which I'll describe later). The potential was there, but I just couldn't find the right spots. Matt knew the area well and offered to take me there to look for fish fossils and collect samples of Albertite. So we left on a Saturday morning to go hunting for rock fishies! There are two reasons why I want to dig around in some of the oldest mountains in North America. The Albert Mines area is composed of many formations made up of dark shale. This shale was the indication that an ancient body of water was here, and the presence of fish fossil does indicate it. The fish species mostly encountered when you split shale in the area is Rhadinichthys Alberti, an animal that used to swim in fresh water about 340 million years ago during the Carboniferous period (Mississipian, Lower). Also in the shale are plant fragments, another clue that could indicate they swam in a shallow body of water. Rhadinichthys Alberti (Jackson, 1851) The other reason is for the "Albertite", a solid substance (bitumen), asphalt. This hydrocarbon can be found in solid state amongst the shale. This substance had become sought after in the early 1850s and was subject in legal battles. Abraham Gesner, the father of kerosene, was fighting the Albert Mining Company over mining rights. Bitumen (Burger, 2008) The albertite had been used by the turn of the twentieth century to light street lamps, amongst other things, in cities such as Boston, Massachussetts. The mine that had been opened to extract this black 'mineral' closed down merely 30 years after it had opened. First stop on the Old Albert Mines road is at the mine dumps. The whole area was essentially used to dump the mine tailings, but have become overgrown with time. The spot we went to was used frequently by ATVs. On the other side of the hill it dips all the way down to a brook. We were able to pick up quite a few samples of Albertite directly from the surface. You have to be careful as you could easily lose your footing due to the loose tailing. Backtracking a little bit and we end up at site #2. Parked the car on the side of the dirt road, opened the trunk, and took the gear we needed to go rock fishing. We proceeded down the trails leading in the fields. This area hasn't been touched by past mining operations, meaning that the shale outcrops should be undisturbed. Sign reading 'CDN OXY, 8I-9, ALBERT MINES' (and some bullet holes) We've chosen an area where a few test digs had been done in the past. Matt recognized the spot where he and others with him had been successful in finding fossil fish. We started to dig and hit our first shale outcrop in only a few minutes. The trick is to be able to find the 'kill bed', where fish would had died (preferably in groups). Matt had mentioned that fish here would be found at about a few inches of each other. Digging for less than hour we didn't find much. Amongst the shale there was the rare plant fragment and a few fish scales. We decided to try another pit close to a row of trees further down the path. This would have proved difficult with all the roots, as the shale outcrop was not that easy to get to. After successfuly reaching the layer of shale, we found a few scales and a fish fossil the shape of a pepperoni, that had been squished (in a vertical position). Matt wanted to go back to that first pit we were at as he had a gut feeling that we would find something. He pointed to a spot I was siting at and he said that there's a good chance the kill bed could be located under my ######. We took our shovels and went at work, digging about a foot until we found what we were looking for. The shale had a different color to it, and the scales were very visible. Suffice to say we had found one of the kill beds as we were able to extract at least a dozen fish. The fish that we found were around three inches or so, but some of the scales were quite large, clues that bigger fish are around but nowhere to be found. Fossil fish, scales, and coprolite (fossilized dung) Most of the fish I had found were incomplete, but the one that I did find and that was mostly complete had an interesting form. When I split the piece of shale, it opened up like a book and in it was a fish that was resting on its belly, curved on itself. You could see the spine, scales, tail and its armoured-looking head. The opposite piece of shale had some of the scales and was a perfect mold of the other piece. The two pieces together look like a heart. Now that I'm more familiar with the area, I intend to come back sometime next Summer. There are more fish and I intend to find myself a complete, and bigger specimen. Till next time. Cheers! (Since this post on my blog, I did go a few times as this site is easy to access. -Keenan)
  11. Continued from Part 1 Part 2 is the culmination of our efforts and attempt to extract the chosen trackways on the following Sunday, that also saw us go back the morning after. We had planned on the to do's and hows' for the day, but as I quickly found out, you basically make decisions on the go once you're there. We also made sure to bring all the equipment needed for our field trip, including some plaster to create a cast if we're unable to extract the trackways. We arrived on site very early in the morning. Matt had thought that we would probably be done sometime in the afternoon, but that the nature of field work can throw curve balls. We were greeted by friends of the person that owned the land where the beach access was. We told them the purpose of our visit and gave them basic information on the importance of the finds made on this beach. They seemed genuinely interested on the trackway we had found. We happily invited them to check us out later in the day at the work site to check these trackways up close. We didn't hold them up for too long as the tides were gonna reach their peak real soon. Knowing that the tides would be high and that we could be stuck for a couple hours, we had the choice of going out for lunch, or head out to the work site and work through the high tide so that we could be done early. Matt had told me that we were expected at the Cape Enrage Interpretation Center by the staff if we wanted to head over there for lunch and meet the staff. Matt had done some work and research for them in the past. They knew that we were in the area and might probably drop by the work site to say hello. The work we were gonna do would be the attempt to extract two trackways. One of them would require breaking it into segments for ease of transportation due to the size. The other trackway would be trickier. The plan would be to rotate the block that had the trackway into an horizontal position so that we could create a plaster cast. The cast would be a 'plan b' if we did attempt to extract the trackway. If anything would happened to the integrity of the trackway, making the recovery impossible, we would at least have the cast. Right from the start we knew that the trackway, which we would need to be cast in plaster first, would be the most challenging and time consuming. That would be our first task. As we got to our location and set ourselves for work, the tide had fully come in. As we were stuck there trapped by the tide, we decided to get right to it. The first thing we had to do is to get the block that the trackway was on leveled. We took our tools and cleared some of the loose rubble away so that we could get some leeway to be able to twist and turn to a favorable position. Once that was done, we chiseled away some of the excess off the block to make sure it wouldn't move while we applied the plaster on the surface. Matt getting ready to move the block That chunk of sandstone was heavier than we anticipated. We managed to rotate and set it into a somewhat flat, leveled position. While we were taking a breather, we took some putty out and made the borders that would hold the liquid plaster to form the mold. While we were working away with the putty, we received some visitors. The people we had met when we first arrived came to check on our progress. Matt had great fun talking with our youngest guest Liam about animals and fossils. Matt and our new friend Liam Preparing the plaster mix! The pouring Let the drying begin! After the plaster was poured and strengthning material applied (cloth to help solidify the mold), we picked up our tools and headed back West to the other site. We were hoping that by the time we are done extracting the other trackway, the plaster cast should be dry. The Sun was at its peak so this should help speeding up the drying process. Second trackway site As pictured in the above diagram, most of the visible tracks are located on one section (East). The plan to retrieve these tracks were to take them off in pieces. Matt had reassured me that it would be easy to put back together, just like a jigsaw puzzle (I saw these tracks a few days later and he did a great job putting them back together). The following photographs show shots from right to left (East to West) to give you a general idea of the surface. On to Part 3!
  12. Continued from Part 2... First set of tracks located on the far right of the slab Second set of tracks Close up featuring some tracks from the second set Multiple sets located near the middle of the trackway slab Transition zone showing activity Toolmarks Toolmarks Toolmarks from left edge of trackway slab Side view with top pointing West Rain drops(?) Closeup of smaller set of tracks Backdrop shows cliff that the trackways originated from, possibly from the upper layers (exposed sandstone stratum, or "layer") Working away on the trackway Working on this trackway proved easier than the other set. This was just a question of collecting the pieces and worry about putting it back together later. We identified the tracks that we wanted to recover and managed to chisel carefully sections without any major damage (intentional or unintentional). We made sure to recover any small bits that flaked off by storing them in sample bags so that they could be reassembled with the bigger pieces. After the final piece was removed, we wrapped all the pieces carefully so they wouldn't damage each other and put them in two backpacks for transportation. These bags were heavy, REAL heavy, but we managed to carry them to a short distance from the vehicule. We didn't want to put them in the car before we decided what to do with the other trackway further East where the plaster mold was still drying. After depositing our backpacks at a dry location, we walked back to the first site to see if the cast had dried. We took our putty knives and carefully, inch by inch, lifted the cast off the rock. It had mostly dried up, but still felt damp due possibly by the water from the rock. Final result of cast The cast ended up being good for what we had to work with. The details weren't excellent, but the definitions were there. We had at least something that could be easily carried out in case we would try to retrieve the original trackway, which we ended up doing. We both decided that it would be worth the trouble trying to retrieve that trackway, no matter how difficult. We started to get pressed for time, so we got right to it by chiseling away as much matrix as we could. At one point we noticed that the trackway had cracks in it, accentuated by the plaster that had filled the gaps. The thing ended up in the end cracking and splitting in three pieces. At first we were ticked at what had happened, but thinking on the distance we had to walk to bring the fragments, it was a blessing in the end. Split in smaller fragments, these weighed like hell. We had a dolly to help us carry it, but the terrain was extremely harsh as we had to make our way through a beach lained with boulders. We had to ease the biggest fragment carefully on the dolly and strap in on tightly, but that proved difficult to say the least. What was worse is the fact we had to roll it, or drag, across the beach. At the pace we were going, we would have never made it by sundown. We decided to cut through the seaweed at the high tide line and try our luck on the sand by the water line. After a period of time that seemed like an infinity, we managed to make it to the sand. What looked like sand at most places was actually silt and mud, making the dolly feel like dead weight. We started to feel desperate and the thought of abandonning the fragment on the beach came to mind. I had the idea to drag the dolly where the water ran between the mud and the rocky seaweed. The water usually carries off the sediment and leaves coarser and grainier sand. The gamble paid off as the wheels didn't sink as much. We made our way close to the beach entrance and the car was parked close by. It took almost every ounce of energy we had to drag that piece of rock over a large sandy hump. That done, we took a breather for a minute or two. Tired as we were, we still had two more fragments AND two backpacks full of sandstone to carry out. We were running out of time and out of daylight. We had less than an hour of sunlight and we still had lots to carry to the car. We went back to retrieve the two fragments we had left behind, which were a lot smaller and could be lifter by a single person. By the time were arrived at the car, the Sun was disappearing behind the tree line. Matt dashed out to the site to grab the equipment we had left behind. I took the opportunity to carry some equipment and a backpack filled with sandstone to the car. With all the equipment and samples at the car, the Sun had set and it was dark. We loaded the car with the backpacks and two of the three fragments. The car was already under a lot of weight with what we had already loaded and we didn't want to push it. We made the decision to leave the fragment at the beach entrance, agreeing to come back to retrieve it soon. I told Matt that I was only working in the afternoon, so we could come back the next morning to retrieve it. We agreed and hopped in the car, exhausted but glad it was done. We had been there from a little after 8AM, and left the area around 8:30PM. The next morning I picked up Matt and we head down South towards Cape Enrage. I was sore like there was no tomorrow. We arrived at the beach and loaded the trackway fragment in the back of my car. Matt asked me if we had time to stop by the Cape Enrage Interpretive Centre. We met up with some wonderful people working there. We had great discussions and we showed them some of the work we did in the area. It was great to see the interest they had in the subject and promoting it. The site is beautiful and the work they did was amazing. They still have the cliffs you can repel down, the restaurant and the lighthouse. What's missing is an interpretive center for the local geology and biology, which would be a great asset to the tourism. We left vowing to come again soon, hopefully to work with them on some project, which would be great. I dropped Matt at his house along with the remaining fragment of trackway. He asked me if I found all this hard work worth it. It was all worth it. I've been able to contribute to something like this, it was worth every minute of it. I would do it all again! Now I'm hoping that these trackways can be displayed so that everybody else can enjoy them. Till the next trek. Cheers! - Keenan
  13. A while back I had posted that I had partaken in a field trip in Southern New Brunswick. Me and my buddy Craig had planned to go on a trip to Parrsboro (Friday, September 9th 2011). That morning I had received an email from my friend Matt about going on a field trip in the Cape Enrage area to investigate the cliffs over there. If we decided to go, I would have the chance to meet Dr. Randall Miller, the current curator of the New Brunswick Museum. We agreed to modify our plans and contacted Matt. After picking up Matt and some morning grub, we proceeded South towards Fundy. Our destination was a beach in the Cape Enrage area. To get there we had to drive down a short dirt road off the main road, not too far from the Cape Enrage Interpretation Center. I'm not gonna give the exact location as the site itself has yet to be checked thoroughly, and the old man that lives close by on this dirt road isn't too fond of strangers from what I'm told. Driving up to the beach we saw Dr. Miller's car already parked. We stepped out of the car, got some basic gear with us and proceeded down the beach to meet up with him. Craig inspecting the cliff up close This location has some of the most beautiful sandstone formations I've yet seen so far in this area. The sandstone color and grain doesn't match the type you'd see at Cape Enrage. These cliffs are Carboniferous in age. There's a fault not far West of our location. Rather than the typical grayish, granular, and coarse sandstone of Cape Enrage (Boss Point Group), you get these red, fine to very fine sandstone. Walking South-East along the beach the sandstone eventually changes to the familiar, quartz-like sandstone. The cliffs from what I can understand, are part of the Mabou Group: the Maringouin formation (reddish sandstone, similar to Johnson's Mills in Dorchester Cape), and Shepody formation (the greyish, coarser grain). If you'd continue further East, the sandstone would get coarser and take a greyer tint, and some pink, with quartzite). You'd run into the Enrage formation, and then Carboniferous Boss Point Group formations, at the tip of Cape Enrage. This information can also not be that accurate. The geological survey of the province, especially in these parts, wasn't probably done to the expected degree. It could be that the formations don't necessarily reside in those exact demarcations as we speak. The age of some of the rocks could possibly vary from previous assessments, but I'm no professional geologist so I couldn't tell ya! Matt (left) and Dr. Miller (right) observing sandstone featuring ripple marks The purpose of this trip is to see if we could locate ichnofossils, fossil trackways left by animals a long time ago. In Nova Scotia, trackways are found in many areas. In New Brunswick, its a different story. At best, the province has recorded less then a dozen trackways in a period of 150 years. If there were more, they just weren't reported, or identified as trackways to the untrained eye. The chance to find trackways to add to the short list would be a great addition, and knowing that I would have contributed in their find would be icing on the cake. It didn't take long before we came upon our first set of tracks. The sandstone slab had broken apart from a bigger layer at a height of at least 15 meters, slid down the cliff and rested belly up, exposing multiple trackways and other features. Two sets of tracks, split at the bottom (coin, also for proportion) The sandstone slab, if I remember, measured about 4 meters (12 feet) in width, and approximately 5 feet in length. The slab also has a convex shape (bulging outward). The right side, viewing if if you're pointing North, shows several trackways, running somewhat perpendicular from each other, crossing path at the South end. Other tracks show up as less detailed the further you look left (westward). Reaching the top of the bulge, tool marks appear, running across the slab at a vertical angle. The tool marks were probably made by material, such as tree branches, dragging at the bottom of the channel. The surface that shows the tracks are also peppered with tiny water droplet features. The figure above shows animals walking along a body of water, leaving tracks in the sand or mud. The plane then dips down to reveal the direction of the current, dragging material which scrapped the bottom along the way. The picture that I can conjure is an animal or several animals (manus/pes of different scale, direction) is of activity. Probably the best place to find animal activity is near a body of water, like the one we found. This was pretty cool indeed to catch animal movement in a setting, enjoying a stroll by the water. These weren't the only trackways we were destined to find that day. The next find came up not too far from that first sandstone slab. on the cliff face were sets of very well elevated tetrapod tracks. From what Matt told me, they were part of a big set that basically crumbled away. The surface also shows weathering patterns caused possibly by water action (ie. rain). Later that day we came up to some broken pieces of sandstone that had rolled down the cliff. The others noticed a piece of sandstone a few couple feet in diameter at an angle, displaying some linear feature. Upon closer inspection, this zigzag of a line was what seemed to be a tail drag! Matt inspecting the newly found trackway This trackway measuring almost 4 feet across, snaked the surface of the sandstone block. The tracks themselves weren't obvious from the get go, but the tail drag was a clear indication that this was made by a small animal a few inches long. The track displays the animal changing direction at one point. The chance to have found such a trackway was extremely exciting. We cleaned the rubble around it and inspected other sandstone fragments in the close vicinity for other tracks. After a few minutes we made a mental note of where this track was located and proceeded further East in search of more. Strata coming together Water channel At this point in our walk we noticed the sedimentary rock change color. Cape Enrage is located a few kilometers East, and this type of sandstone is what you'd find over there. We had walked into a different formation. We decided to turn around and head back. Walking back we looked around for sandstone bearing similar surface features as the last trackway we had found that afternoon. We had found tracks of various sizes easily detectable to the eye from a distance. While we did find some nice trackways, we were also keeping an eye out for trackways that we would usually have passed over if not for inspecting up close the sandstone littering the beach. This is the result of paying attention to minor details. Dr. Miller and Matt had come across a block where the surface showed small, very faint lines running parallel to each other. Hermit crabs, to my knowledge, don't leave trackways of this type. At this stage nobody in our group could positively identify these diminutive tracks. They agreed that the best thing they could do, given the size of the block, is to try to extract it from the beach. **IMPORTANT** Extracting trackways or fossils, important such as these ones, are legal only if you have a permit to do so by the Province of New Brunswick. Luck today, we had Dr. Miller who is the sole authority in the province when it comes to these issuing these permits. Legalities aside, we endeavored to skim off the excess matrix from the sandstone block to make it easier to carry. Inspecting the favorable spots to chisel Chiseling away the excess 'fat' On our walk back we stopped at the last trackway we came across to take detailed pictures. Given the size of the chunk of sandstone the trackway was laying on, extraction would at this point seem quasi-impossible. Geologists are part human, part spider monkey After taking notes of the finds today, came the dilemma of what to do with these. We all talked about how these tracks would be nice additions to the scientific community. The more we discussed it, the more we came to the realization that we had to try to extract these bigger trackways off the beach for research and record. Dr. Miller wouldn't be available as he had to leave for Norway on conferences. I suggested to Matt that we could come in two days and try to extract at least one set of trackway, and create a plaster cast of the other. We all agreed that this was very important and that me and Matt would come back on Sunday for a little bit of field work. With the papers to make our job easier, we agreed to come back and try to remove these suckers, in the name of science of course. =) That's it for Part 1 of this excursion. That day was the preliminary expedition to search and find worthy specimens and we were in great luck. Now the tough job was to try and extract if possible, or at least cast them if extraction deemed to troublesome. I mentioned to Matt that this was an amazing opportunity to be able to partake in professional field work. The other thing is that I would also be schooled on the basics of field work and sedimentology, both subjects I wanted to learn more. We agreed on time and location for Sunday and make the necessary preparations. On to Part 2!
  14. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since May 6, 2018. Canada Faunas and Localities Alberta Alberta - Devonian Meijer Drees, N.C., et al. (2002). Lithostratigraphy, Sedimentology, Paleontology, Organic Petrology, and Organic Geochemistry of the Middle Devonian Ashern, Winnipegosis, and Eyot Formations in East-Central Alberta and West-Central Saskatchewan. Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 572. Alberta - Jurassic Frebold, H. (1966). Upper Pliensbachian Beds in the Fernie Group of Alberta. Geological Survey of Canada, Paper 66-27. Martindale, R.C., et al. (2017). A new Early Jurassic (ca. 183 Ma) fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Alberta, Canada. The Geological Society of America, open access. (Thanks to Oxytropidoceras for finding this one!) Martindale, R.C., et al. (2017). Supplementary Data to "A new Early Jurassic fossil Lagerstätte from Ya Ha Tinda, Canada (~183 Ma)" - GSA Data Repository 2017066. Alberta - Cretaceous Brinkman, D.B. and A.G. Neuman (2002). Teleost Centra from Uppermost Judith River Group (Dinosaur Park Formation, Campanian) of Alberta, Canada. J.Paleont., 76(1). Brinkman, D.B., et al. (2004). Vertebrate palaeocommunities of the lower Judith River Group (Campanian) of southeastern Alberta, Canada, as interpreted from vertebrate microfossil assemblages. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 213. Cullen, T.M., et al. (2016). A vertebrate microsite from a marine-terrestrial transition in the Foremost Formation (Campanian) of Alberta, Canada, and the use of faunal assemblage data as a paleoenvironmental indicator. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 444. Dalzell, M.T.J. (2007). Correlated Biostratigraphy and Palaeoecology of Microplankton from the Bearpaw Formation (Campanian-Maastrichtian) of Alberta, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Saskatchewan. Dodson, P. (1983). A Faunal Review of the Judith River (Oldman) Formation, Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta. The Mosasaur, Vol.1. Eberth, D.A. (2010). A Revised Stratigraphic Architecture and History for the Horseshoe Canyon Formation (Upper Cretaceous) , Southern Alberta Plains. GeoCanada 2010 - Working with the Earth. Fanti, F. and T. Miyashita (2009). A high latitude vertebrate fossil assemblage from the Late Cretaceous of west-central Alberta, Canada: evidence for dinosaur nesting and vertebrate latitudinal gradient. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 275. Lavigne, J.M. (1999). Aspects of Marginal Marine Sedimentology, Stratigraphy and Ichnology of the Upper Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formation, Drumheller, Alberta. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta. (158 pages) Lillegraven, J.A. (1969). Latest Cretaceous Mammals of Upper Part of Edmonton Formation of Alberta, Canada, and Review of Marsupial-Placental Dichotomy in Mammalian Evolution. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Article 50 (Vertebrata 12). Mellon, G.B. (1967). Stratigraphy and Petrology of the Lower Cretaceous Blairmore and Manville Groups, Alberta Foothills and Plains. Research Council of Alberta, Bulletin 21. Mychaluk, K.A., A.A. Levinson and R.L. Hall (2001). Ammolite: Iridescent Fossilized Ammonite from Southern Alberta, Canada. Gems and Gemology, Vol.37, Number 1. Nielsen, K.S., et al. (2008). Turonian to Santonian paleoenvironmental changes in the Cretaceous Western Interior Sea: The Carlile and Niobrara formations in southern Alberta and southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 270. (Author's personal copy) Peng, J. (1997). Palaeoecology of Vertebrate Assemblages from the Upper Cretaceous Judith River Group (Campanian) of Southeastern Alberta, Canada. Ph.D. Dissertation - The University of Calgary. (330 pages) Quinney, A. (2011). The Upper Cretaceous Horseshoe Canyon Formation: using paleosols to reconstruct ancient environments, climates, and record of sea level change in a dinosaur-dominated terrestrial ecosystem. Masters Thesis - University of Calgary. (156 pages) Wood, J.M., R.G. Thomas and J. Visser (1988). Fluvial Processes and Vertebrate Taphonomy: The Upper Cretaceous Judith River Formation, South-Central Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 66. Alberta - Paleocene Scott, C.S. (2001). Middle Paleocene Mammals from Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Masters Thesis - University of Alberta. Scott, C.S., R.C. Fox and G.P. Youzwyshyn (2002). New earliest Tiffanian (late Paleocene) mammals from Cochrane 2, southwestern Alberta, Canada. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 47(4). Simpson, G.G. (1927). Mammalian Fauna and Correlation of the Paskapoo Formation of Alberta. American Museum Novitates, Number 268. Alberta - Pleistocene Barendregt, R.W., C.S. Churcher and A. MacS. Stalker (1988). Stratigraphy, paleomagnetism, and vertebrate paleontology of Quaternary preglacial sediments at the Maser-Frisch Site, southeastern Alberta. Geological Society of America Bulletin. Vol.100. Burns, J.A. and R.R. Young (1994). Pleistocene mammals of the Edmonton area, Alberta. Part I. The Carnivores. Can.J. Earth Sci., 31. British Columbia British Columbia - Precambrian Hofmann, H.J., E.W. Mountjoy and M.W. Teitz (1985). Ediacaran fossils from the Miette Group, Rocky Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. Geology, Vol.13 British Columbia - Cambrian Caron, J.-B. and D.A. Jackson (2008). Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 258. Caron, J.-B. and D. Rudkin (eds.)(2009). A Burgess Shale Primer. History, Geology and Research Highlights. International Conference on the Cambrian Explosion, Field Trip Companion Volume. Caron, J.-B., et al. (2014). A new phyllopod bed-like assemblage from the Burgess Shale of the Canadian Rockies. Nature Communications, 5:3210. Johnston, K.J., P.A. Johnston and W.G. Powell (2009). A new, Middle Cambrian, Burgess Shale-type biota, Bolaspidella Zone, Chancellor Basin, southeastern British Columbia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, xxx. (Article in press) Johnston, P.A., et al. (2009). Palaeontology and depositional environments of ancient brine seeps in the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale at The Monarch, British Columbia, Canada. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 277. Morris, S.C. and R.A. Robison (1988). More Soft-Bodied Animals and Algae from the Middle Cambrian of Utah and British Columbia. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 122. British Columbia - Triassic Schaeffer, B. and M. Mangus (1976). An Early Triassic Fish Assemblage from British Columbia. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Vol.156, Article 5. Stanley, G.D. and B. Senowbari-Daryan (1999). Upper Triassic Reef Fauna from the Quesnel Terrane, Central British Columbia, Canada. J.Paleont., 23(5). Zonneveld, J.-P., M.K. Gingras and S.G. Pemberton (2001). Trace fossil assemblages in a Middle Triassic mixed siliciclastic carbonate marginal marine depositional system, British Columbia. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 166. British Columbia - Cretaceous Haggart, J.W., et al. (2009). Molluscan biostratigraphy and paleomagnetism of Campanian strata, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia: implications for Pacific coast North America biochronology. Cretaceous Research, 30. Plint, A.G. (1996). Marine and non-marine systems tracts in fourth-order sequences in the Early-Middle Cenomanian, Dunvegan Alloformation, northeastern British Columbia, Canada. In: High Resolution Sequence Stratigraphy: Innovations and Applications. Howell, J.A. and J.F Aitken (eds.), Geological Society Special Publication Number 104. British Columbia - Eocene Archibald, S.B., et al. (2011). Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, Vol.38, Number 4. Archibald, S.B., et al. (2010). Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington): emergent communities in Early Eocene climates. GeoCanada 2010 - Working with the Earth. Dillhoff, R.M., E.B. Leopold and S.R. Manchester (2005). The McAbee flora of British Columbia and its relation to the Early-Middle Eocene Okanagan Highlands flora of the Pacific Northwest. Can.J. Earth Sci., Vol.42. Greenwood, D.R., et al. (2005). Fossil biotas from the Okanagan Highlands, southern British Columbia and northeastern Washington State: climates and ecosystems across an Eocene landscape. Can.J. Earth Sci., 42. Ludvigsen, R. (2001). The fossils at Driftwood Canyon Provincial Park: A management plan for BC parks. Mathewes, R.W., D.R. Greenwood and S.B. Archibald (2016). Paleoenvironments of the Quilchena flora, British Columbia during the Early Eocene Climatic Optimum. Can.J. Earth Sci., 53. Poinar, G., B. Archibald and A. Brown (1999). New Amber Deposit Provides Evidence of Early Paleogene Extinctions, Paleoclimates and Past Distributions. The Canadian Entomologist, 131. Villeneuve, M. and R. Mathewes (2005). An Early Eocene age for the Quilchena fossil locality, southern British Columbia. Geological Survey of Canada, Current Research, 2005-A4. Wilson, M.V.H. (1977). Paleoecology of Eocene lacustrine varves at Horsefly, British Columbia. Can.J. Earth Sci., 14. British Columbia - Pleistocene Driver, J.C. (1988). Late Pleistocene and Holocene vertebrates and palaeoenvironments from Charlie Lake Cave, northeast British Columbia. Can.J. Earth Sci., 25. General British Columbia Costenius, K.N., et al. (1989). Reconnaissance Paleontologic Study of the Kishenehn Formation, Northwestern Montana and Southeastern British Columbia. 1989 MGS Field Conference, Montana Centennial. Johns, M.J., C.R. Barnes and Y.R. Narayan (2005). Cenozoic and Cretaceous Ichtyoliths from the Tofino Basin and Western Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.8, Issue 2. Manitoba Bamburak, J.D., J. Hatcher and M.P.B. Nicholas (2012). Chemostratigraphy, paleontology and mineral potential of the Gammon Ferruginous Member of the Cretaceous Pierre Shale in southwestern Manitoba (parts of NTS 62F, G, H, J, K, N, O, 63C, F). In: Report of Activities 2012. Manitoba Innovation, Energy and Mines, Manitoba Geological Survey. Elias, R.J., et al. (2013). Ordovician-Silurian boundary interval in the Williston Basin outcrop belt of Manitoba: a record of global and regional environmental and biotic change. Field Trip Guidebook FT-C5/ Open File OF2013-1. Kilmury, A. (2016). Deposition and Fauna of the Chasm Creek Formation (Upper Ordovician): Core M-3-03 (Airport Cove West) near Churchill, Manitoba. Bachelors Thesis (Honours) - The University of Manitoba. McGregor, D.C., et al. (1971). Fossils of the Red River Formation (Cat Head Member), Manitoba. Contributions to Canadian Paleontology, Geological Survey of Canada, Bulletin 202. Nelson, S.J. and M.E. Johnson (2002). 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