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Found 31 results

  1. Paleocene plants in Central North Dakota are among the first fossils I've collected. Despite this I haven't given them the attention they are due lately. The preservation is very nice but due to various reasons they've taken a back seat to other outcrops in the state like the Cretaceous ones and I haven't thought about them for awhile. I am now reorganizing some of my Paleocene collection and a spark was reignited in me. I've decided to post some of the best examples here as a result. Come spring hopefully I can collect in additional Fort Union sites. The terrestrial Paleocene deposits I've collected in all belong to the Fort Union Group, mostly the Sentinel Butte Formation and the Bullion Creek Formation. I see that some sources now list the Fort Union Group as a formation and the Sentinel Butte and Bullion Creek as members but for the purposes of this post I'll treat it as a group. First, petrified wood is a common constituent of the Fort Union Group. Some of the wood is rather spectacular though. Silicified patterns are often striking. This piece is Sentinel Butte Formation.
  2. North Dakota Pierre Shale Trip

    I have an ambivalent relationship with the Pierre Shale. I try and try to find good sites that produce fossils but the end result is usually a fossil-less site. For a long time I quit trying exposures of Pierre Shale even though it's the closest fossil bearing exposure to where I live. About a year ago I decided to try the Pierre Shale again because it was close and I was too tired to go elsewhere, like the Fox Hills Formation in Central ND. Mostly I found worn Inoceramus fragments but to my surprise I found a nicely preserved caudal vertebrae from a mosasaur among float material. Following that I began to try the Pierre a little more and today, after finally getting landowner permission, I spent the day at a site with extensive exposures. Most of the Pierre Shale exposures in East-central North Dakota are of the DeGrey Member. The most obvious feature of this member is a large amount of iron manganese carbonate concretions. The few fossils I find in the Pierre here are usually in these worn concretions. The first fossils I found didn't come from the Pierre at all but came from glacial erratic limestone. I occasionally find older material like this among the tons of glacial material that blankets most of this part of the state but rarely do I find such well preserved/unworn specimens. Some nice brachiopods to start. I was happy to collect some of these among a split limestone boulder despite the lack of specific age/locality data. Moving towards the actual Pierre Shale deposits there is distinct worn shale with bands of worn concretions. The large tract of land I had permission to collect on was covered in these exposures.
  3. I've been posting Fox Hills Formation fossils from a recent trip but I feel that those are a poor representation of the often spectacular preservation and diversity of the Fox Hills Formation. Because of that I've decided to post some of my better Fox Hills specimens from North Dakota. We'll start with some lovely ammonites. Jeletzkytes nebrascensis is common throughout the Fox Hills Formation in the Timber Lake Member (perhaps a bit less so in North Dakota) and is a typical flagship species for the formation. This microconch from Emmons County is the largest complete J. nebrascensis I've collected. The slash mark is an unfortunate result of removing an ammonite from directly atop this one before I was aware of this one. I think it turned out well despite that.
  4. Amphibian (Scapherpeton) jaw section?

    Hi everyone, I haven't posted an ID in a while as I'm at college and don't have ready access to my fossils to take pics. However tonight, through sheer coincidence, I noticed a recognizable fossil online after looking at the new discovery of an albanerpetonid amphibian preserved in amber. After checking if these amphibians had been found in the Hell Creek I see an image come up of a jaw identified as belonging to scapherpeton (a true salamander) and recognized some features similar to a specimen of my own which I had never posted. I found this small jaw section in the Hell Creek fm. of North Dakota and while I don't remember a specific measurement I am confident that is was about 1 cm in length give or take a few mm. Here's the pic of the jaw I saw online, posted by the national museum of natural history on their google arts and culture page. Here's my small jaw:
  5. I was very happy to see that recent publication that finally described the youngest known alvarezsurid Trierarchuncus prairiensis from the Hell Creek Formation. Material is rare but is most commonly overlooked and described as Croc or unknown theropod so knowing what to look for helps. I'm constantly on the lookout for this material and have been for years and have been fortunate to either find it or be able to acquire it over time. I used publications of other Alvarezsauridae like the Asian Mononykus and Canadian Albertonykus to help in the identification of my specimens. The paper is pay-walled but I included it for reference purposes. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195667120302469?via%3Dihub Extremely rare associated material found in SD
  6. buffalo teeth

    I came across these in central North Dakota while looking for Teredo wood I assume they are modern buffalo teeth, but when I took a blowtorch to the root, it didn't have much of a burn smell. some of the small bits of root eventually blackened. This isn't so much an identification problem as a question- but confirmation of buffalo is fine, and if I am wrong, correction to the correct animal is welcome. Question: in the process of "fossilization", as collagen or whatever is replaced by minerals, how can you age a specimen, modern vs 'fossil' vs partially 'fossilized'
  7. Hi everyone, it's been a while since I've posted something to have ID'd so I thought I would take a few pictures of the oddities in my collection and post them on here. I'd like to know people's opinions on this piece of bone I found in the Hell Creek formation of North Dakota which looks like it may have holes in it made by bone boring invertebrates. Here they are!
  8. What Kind of Premax?

    I found this theropod premaxillary tooth on my last day in North Dakota this past summer and since then I've wondered about what it is and if it had and diagnostic features of an particular theropod group. It's just over a centimeter long and has no serrations.
  9. Struthiomimus Vertebrae

    Hi all, these two fossils were found in North Dakota's Hell Creek fm. this past summer. I believe they are vertebrae from ornithomimosaurs but I'm not certain. I'd like the input of my peers on the forum. The first one seems like it would be from a juvenile as it's mostly complete but very small at just under an inch long. The other is missing an end, but is a bit larger at about an inch and a quarter in length. First: Second:
  10. Hell Creek Fish (?) Jaw Section

    Hey everyone, I found this little jaw section at a microsite in North Dakota's Hell Creek formation this past summer and I'm finally getting around to posting about it. I believe it's fish, possibly gar, but I'm not sure. I'd like to know people's opinions. It's about 1.3 centimeters long. Thanks, Noel
  11. Dire Wolf?

    Here is another one of my impulse purchases. Loved the look and OK price. But, is it really a Dire Wolf partial skull. Information only said "found in North Dakota by father 15 years ago". Seller didn't have a fossil knowledge. Help!
  12. Hi everyone, I missed the updates for the last three days so here they are. I spent the last 3 days of the week fossil hunting the Hell Creek badlands of North Dakota- In those 3 days I found some of the best fossils in my collection so far. Wednesday was somewhat overcast which kept the exposures from being too hot. I spent the morning working a microsite with a few other people. My best finds here included a nice quality croc tooth, a likely bird bone and a bowfin jaw. Unfortunately the finds started to fizzle out after about an hour. The rest of the day was spent prospecting a wide open area which provided very little for fossil finds, the best being a croc vert. Here are the pics from Wednesday- Bowfin jaw section Croc tooth Likely a toe or limb bone A view of the microsite A croc vert A view of the area we prospected A rattlesnake in a burrow which I spotted at just the right time. I was moving closer to look at a large shed snake skin and saw this guy in a hole underneath the grass, he didn't rattle at me either which makes this a lucky encounter. (I didn't this close with my camera, I only zoomed in with it).
  13. Petrified Wood

    Hello, I just joined and am curious about my petrified wood! I live in North Dakota. I have a lot of it over many acres however mine looks different than a lot I look up. It’s more light gray dark gray black and white. Any info would be appreciated.
  14. Mystery item found in western ND

    Hi everyone, I came across this object earlier this evening and I was wondering if anyone could help me figure out what it is. It was found embedded in a soft rock (soft enough to scrape away large chunks with a pocket knife) with just a small cross-section exposed. It first grabbed my attention because it appears round and hollow in cross-section, and was a different color and harder than the surrounding material. The rock it was found in was at the top of a hill, and located in western North Dakota, just barely across the border from Montana. My friend and I tried to brainstorm what it could be, but everything we could think of didn't quite seem to fit. If anyone has any ideas, I'd really appreciate it! Also willing to accept that it might just be a weird rock... Thanks! (More photos to come in the comments)
  15. Very cool article on a Hell Creek Fm bonebed in Bowman, North Dakota A meteor impact 66 million years ago generated a tsunami-like wave in an inland sea that killed and buried fish, mammals, insects and a dinosaur, the first victims of Earth’s last mass extinction event. The death scene from within an hour of the impact has been excavated at an unprecedented fossil site in North Dakota. (Graphics and photos courtesy of Robert DePalma) https://news.berkeley.edu/2019/03/29/66-million-year-old-deathbed-linked-to-dinosaur-killing-meteor/
  16. News About North Dakota's Plesiosaurs

    Jeff J. Person & Becky Barnes, 2018, New Plesiosaur Exhibit at Heritage Center State Museum. Department of Mineral Resources Geo News. 45(2) pp. 1-4. https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/documents/newsletter/2018Summer/New_Plesiosaur_Exhibit_at_Heritage_Center_State_Museum.pdf https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/newsletter/2018Summer.asp Clint A. Boyd, 2018, A Pleasing Discovery from North Dakota’s Ancient Seas. Department of Mineral Resources Geo News. 45(2) pp. 5-10 https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/documents/newsletter/2018Summer/A_Pleasing_Discovery_from_North_Dakotas_Ancient_Seas.pdf https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndgs/newsletter/2018Summer.asp Yours, Paul H.
  17. Isle of Skye, Scotland Fossil hunting on Scotland's Isle of Skye – the "real Jurassic Park" CBS NEWS, June 21, 2018, https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dinosaur-fossil-hunting-in-scotland-real-jurassic-park-isle-of-skye/ Dickinson, North Dakota Public has fun in the dirt at public fossil dig in Dickinson, North Dakota. By: Steve Kirch, My ND Now, Jun 23, 2018 https://www.myndnow.com/news/dickinson-news/public-has-fun-in-the-dirt-at-public-fossil-dig-in-dickinson/1257277888 North Dakota Geological Survey Paleontology 2018 Fossil Digs https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndfossil/digs/ Fossils in North Dakota (FIND) Newsletter https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndfossil/kids/ Yours, Paul H.
  18. North Dakota fossils?

    Hello, I will be going to visit kin up in Ottertail county Minnesota over the 4th of July week. We are coming up from Florida, and have some relatives towards Ashley/Napoleon as well as in Minnesota Despite visiting MN/ND repeatedly throughout my life, I know almost nothing about fossil hunting possibilities, aside from the famous Badlands finds...my focus has always been on fishing and such, but my 5 year old is high on fossiling (and has quite a collection from Florida already) We are flying in from Florida to the Cities and driving out west. IF any of y'all have insight on: 1) locations in Western Minnesota or Eastern North Dakota (Jamestown, GF, Fargo, maybe out to Bismarck) to look for fossils 2) locations between Fergus Falls and the Cities 3) guides or trips we could participate in 4) fossil/dinosaur related sites to see in that part of the country 5) tips on applicable laws we should be aware of ...I would be GREATLY obliged Thanks y'all very much in advance
  19. Detroit Lakes??

    Hello, I will be going to visit kin up in Ottertail county over the 4th of July week. We are coming up from Florida Despite visiting Minnesota repeatedly throughout my life, I know almost nothing about fossil hunting possibilities...my focus has always been on fishing and such, but my 5 year old is high on fossiling (and has quite a collection from Florida already) We are flying in from Florida to the Cities and driving out. IF any of y'all have insight on: 1) locations around ottertail county/detroit lakes 2) locations between Fergus Falls and the Cities 3) locations in EASTERN North Dakota 4) guides or trips we could participate in 5) fossil/dinosaur related sites to see in that part of the country 6) tips on applicable laws we should be aware of ...I would be GREATLY obliged I reckon anything between MSP and Jamestown ND would be reasonable, bu the closer to Fergus, Alexandria, DL, etc., the better! Thanks y'all very much in advance
  20. Hi there, I'm new to the fossil forum, and was hoping I could get help in identifying this jaw. It was found in Marmarth, North Dakota in the Hell Creek Formation. I don't have any more specifics on location besides that. I hope the pictures are detailed enough, but if not, I can post more. I am thinking it has to be some kind of fish, but I am not completely sure. Any direction or help would be wonderful! Thank you so much!
  21. Is this coprolite?

    I need help identifying this. It was in my childhood rock collection. It looks a LOT like some of the corpolite pictures I see online. Does it look like that to you all? It probably came from central North Dakota since that was where I lived, but even that I'm not sure about because we did go on family trips to Montana, and sometimes South Dakota. So it could possibly have come from those states as well. Anybody have any ideas what it is?
  22. Hell Creek Coprolites

    Hi all, I just got back from a fantastic dig near Marmarth, ND. I was in coprolite heaven! I am wondering if anyone has any clues about the round inclusion in the first photo. It is phosphatic. I thought it was particularly interesting because I rarely see inclusions in this type of coprolite. I am also including photos of some of the more interesting coprolites I found along with a really cool ichnofossil found by another member of our group. What is interesting about this one is that it is furrowed on both the rounded and concave ends.
  23. T. rex teeth found near Bismarck set state record Amy Dalrymple Bismarck Tribune Aug 22, 2017 http://bismarcktribune.com/t-rex-teeth-found-near-bismarck-set-state-record/article_7209322c-1a5e-58c1-98c4-fdcd482eefd6.html North Dakota Geological Survey makes history in 2017 with T-Rex teeth discoveries, Oil and Gas 360 https://www.oilandgas360.com/finding-more-than-oil-in-north-dakota/ https://medium.com/@oilandgas360/finding-more-than-oil-in-north-dakota-d9e4cfb50289 North Dakota Geological Survey Paleontology 2018 Fossil Digs https://www.dmr.nd.gov/ndfossil/digs/ Yours, Paul H.
  24. On a popular internet site is this absolutely gorgeous tooth out of the Hell Creek Formation in North Dakota. The tooth is perfect and the colors are stunning! The problem is that it is being sold as a juvenile T.rex tooth, and it is clearly a Nanotyrannus tooth. If it were priced at $300, I'd snatch it up in a heartbeat. Description says that it is too robust to be a Nano tooth. . Notice no picture of the base of the tooth is shown in the listing, so it's difficult for one to be 100% certain. Size is only 1.26 inches.
  25. Is It Bone

    Another piece from Burleigh county. There is a large hill of ice thrust Fox Hills formation at this site, parked on top of Cannonball formation and Bullion Creek and covered with glacial debris. Fox Hills is a near shore marine formation. The others are terrestrial. The surface texture looks like some of the bones I have seen here, but the inside of the rock seems wrong for bone. It is 31 mm long. 20 mm high, and 22 mm wide. Photos are top, bottom, and side view respectively.
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