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Found 8 results

  1. 2013 Dino Dig Wrap Up!

    The 10 day dig at Wasson Bluff, where the oldest dinosaurs found in Canada can be found, wrapped up last Sunday. Many interesting finds were made and lots of people contributed to make this dig a successful one. Dr. Tim Fedak posted on the Earthquake Dinosaurs's blog a very good summary of the successful project. Click on the link to check it out! http://earthquake-dinosaurs.ca/volunteers-and-science/ I was very proud to have participated in this project! Cheers! - Keenan
  2. Field work is going on right now at the site where Canada's oldest dinosaurs were found, near Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. For a period of about 10 days, Dr. Tim Fedak and his team of students and volunteers are hoping to make some discoveries to add to the region's rich fossil history. Article from Nova Scotia's Chronicle Herald: Digging for Dinosaur Clues - http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1147369-digging-for-dinosaur-clues One of the target areas where the team is concentrating their effort to find an elusive dinosaur bone bed Fedak is among a number of people that had made important discoveries and unearth information on what went on during its ancient past in the Parrsboro area. Wasson's bluff has seen some of Canada's oldest dinosaur skeletons come out of these sandstones, tracing back all the way to the 1970s and beyond. Two Islands, viewed from across the dig site Prosauropods, early plant eating dinosaurs from the Triassic Period, fish, giant crocodiles, and some of the earliest mammal-like reptile remains have been found in the past, and the search continues to try to unveil more so to fill in more on this ongoing puzzle. Dig site, looking East (volcanic basalt in background) The dig site at Wasson's bluff is trenched, or wedged, between volcanic basalt from lava flows from a tumultuous past where Pangaea began to separate. This tectonic cacophony resulted in causing chaos and interesting physiology on the local topography. This is also a reason why they call these early dinosaurs 'earthquake dinosaurs' as the remains have been fractured, split, and pulled apart by the result of all this tectonic activity. Dig site, looking West (more of that volcanic basalt from ancient lava flows in the background) I went down there on Tuesday to volunteer and lend a hand for a few hours to this fascinating project. The heat was full on, the Sun blazing, and the wind nowhere to be found. To be able to get to some of the layers that might be containing bones, several tons of rocks and sand had to be moved. The process has to go to a slow and steady pace as not to damage any of the bones that could be hidden right under our tools. An alternate site a short distance from the main one has also yielded bone. The team has been making good progress in identifying and locating any remains that would come out. Yellow circles indicate bones found in situ As I type this, work is still going on at Wasson's bluff. They are hard at work to uncover any new specimen that can help us create a more complete picture of what went on. Lets wish them all the luck and hope they make amazing discoveries for all to share! I will be going down there again as Parrsboro is also hosting its 48th Annual Gem and Mineral show, the only one East of Montreal, Canada! If you're in the area, please drop on by! Info on the event at this address: http://museum.gov.ns.ca/fgm/en/home/whattoseedo/gemmineralshow/default.aspx If you want to know more about the project, or to keep updated with what's going on, you can visit http://earthquake-dinosaurs.ca, http://edinos.ca, visit their facebook page at http://facebook.com/EarthquakeDinosaurs, or follow them on Twitter @EarthquakeDinos! Keenan signing out!
  3. http://thechronicleherald.ca/novascotia/1147369-digging-for-dinosaur-clues Article on the work going on at Wasson's Bluff, site of where Canada's oldest dinos were found. I just posted on the forums a blog post I just did, as I went down there myself to lend a hand. http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/39864-dig-going-on-at-wassons-bluff-where-oldest-dinosaurs-in-canada-have-been-found/
  4. Here's the link to the original blog post: http://redleafz.blogspot.ca/2013/04/somewhere-in-parrsboro-there-are.html A few days ago I drew a map of the West Bay/Cape Sharp area South-West of the town of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia. I had wanted to check the Jurassic age basalt cliffs of Cape Sharp and poke around a bit to see if I could come out with anything. On the cliffs on each side of Cape Sharp are Carboniferous sandstone cliffs which displays a fascinating record of trackways, especially those of tetrapods. I had marked on my makeshift map where the location of a possible access point to the beach would be. If that wasn't the case, I had a plan B, set by driving back towards Parrsboro and finding an access point via Partridge Island. I woke up Sunday (April 14th) morning and it was snowing. I said to myself: "Rain, Snow, or Shine, I'm heading down!". I hit the road at 7am that same morning. The temperature kept at about 0oC Celcius so the road conditions were pretty decent. The snow was melting as soon as it hit the pavement. I had checked the forecast the night before and they had called for higher temperature and a break in late morning. That was good enough for me. I got to the road leading to the supposed beach access by driving a red, muddy, slippery road with my Rabbit. My car is usually gray, but not this morning after my trip down here. I parked the car, got my gear, and headed down the path. Getting down the trail was somewhat annoying. Big trees had fallen at numerous spots and sometimes that meant I had to crawl in the mud or hop on the logs. I'm barely 5'2", so yeah it wasn't a pretty picture. Cape Sharp behind the snowy haze I got to the ledge of the cliff and there was somewhat of a 'trail' going down. It zigzagged a bit but the last 15 feet were just muck and loose sediment. I don't think that if I went down I could get myself back up. I tested the trail halfway and tried going back up. The face of the cliff was so loose and slippery that it took every ounce of strength in me to make it back up. There was no other spots to go down so, defeated, I made my way back up the steep trail. I exerted myself trying to go up that I had to lie down for a few minutes, fighting waves of nausea. During that episode I somehow managed to gash my hand pretty good. Wet, muddy, and bloodied, I sat my sorry in the car and drove to Plan B. West tip of Partridge Island There was no way that this rock trip was gonna be in vain, so I found myself taking the beach road behind the Ottawa House down West Bay Road. Last time I was here was in 2011 so my memory was a little bit hazy. I drove down the sandy road and after dodging or ramming through some major olympic sized pools of water, I managed to park in a safe area. Dirty rabbit! The tides were coming back slowly so I had lots of time to stroll on the beach. Everything was wet so I was curious to see if I could still spot trackways with all the glare. Turns out after a few minutes that I could, and I managed to spot some old tracks and some new ones. The cliffs are put at about Late Carboniferous, and are part of the Cumberland Group - Parrsboro Formation. The layers show an environment alternating between wet and arid, indicated by layers rich in river biota with surrounding vegetation, and the next indicating dryer conditions. Mud crack features The next few photos show a series of trackways and close ups of the ones I managed to spot. Multiple sets of tracks Tracks running horizontal Set of tracks, evenly spaced, with drag mark running along the center Close up of one of the indentation (from the previous photo) No clue at the present of what this is In a section that was protected from the elements, I took the time to take a closer look at some of the rippled surface and found some nice tiny tracks skipping on the surface. Each mes/pes are about ~1cm, running in several directions. Folding where two major faults intersect. The rock is strained and the strate disappears under a thick mix of glacial till, only to reappear a few hundred feet further West. Some trackways to be found, but mostly deformed and barely identifiable. This trip ended up being a very good one. I was able to get to see a few things I haven't seen before, and new data to incorporate in my ever evolving map of the area. Shows that its nice to prepare a litte in advance so that you're not left in a lurch. To finish a good trip in Parrsboro, I had to stop at my friends place, Doug and Jackie's of course! Stayed a while and talked rock. I managed to get out of town with two gorgeous pieces to add to my ever increasing mineral collection. Here's their site: http://www.amethystboutique.com/ On this note, I leave you to your musings. Cheers!
  5. Wasson Bluff (Parrsboro)

    Taken from a June 2011 trip - http://redleafz.blogspot.ca I've since gone to that site so many times I can't remember. This location is as rich in fossil material as it is in minerals. Enjoy! Wasson Bluff - Parrsboro, Nova Scotia Every year the Fundy Geological Museum (FGM) hosts curatorial walks of the many sites located in the Parrsboro area in Nova Scotia. Saturday June 11th the FGM organized a curatorial walk of the Wasson Bluff located a few minutes east of Parrsboro, on Two Islands Road. I had gone only once before last Summer. I was happy to go back as I wanted to find out all the information I could get from Wasson Bluff. Wasson Bluff is a very special place, as the earliest dinosaurs have been discovered in this area. This area has seen the smallest dinosaur foot prints ever found, some of Canada's oldest dinosaurs ever found, and important signs and clues of the ever changing landscape and makeup of the Earth. The curatorial walks are free, and that weekend being tourism week, the admittance to the Fundy Geological Museum exhibit was also free. Me and my friend Craig, along with some other fellas had some time to spare before the walk, so we checked it out. It is well worth it as they have a lot of interactive games and displays, and wonderful specimens on display. By the time we were done the museum, there was still about an hour left before the tour, so we asked for directions on local eats. The friendly staff helped us by pointing out local restaurants not too far in town. We opted for one that was at the end of a street next to the museum on Pier road. The tiny restaurant, the Harbour View, was a home cooking style seafood restaurant and it didn't disappoint. The food was great and the service was good. View of the bay from the restaurant. Wasson Bluff is located further west of the FGM on Two Islands road. It takes a little bit less than 15 minutes. Here's a few pics from the walk: Getting ready for the hike. My friend Craig on the left. The welcome sign at the Wasson Bluff entrance. Hopping down the steep trail. Easier down than up as I would learn coming back up. Finally on the beach! View of Clarke Head. The tip of the cliff is darker basalt/volcanic rock. The gray/greenish-like part of the cliffs is gypsum/salt-like sediments, remains of bodies of water that vanished a long time ago. From there to where I was standing were the different faults and strata that make up the general landscape of this part of Wasson Bluff. Ken Adams, our interpreter, and also the FGM's curator. (Two Islands in the background) Close to the beach entrance you'd get these strata of sandstone and mudstone. These look similar to the carboniferous strata you'd encounter at beaches like Joggins. The sandstone show animal tracks and natural weathering. Ichnofossils (animal tracks) made by ancient animals. Cliff made up of volcanic rock. Sedimentary mud filled with clastic basalt rocks and bone fragments. Clastic basalt fragments in sedimentary silt, signs of the work of continents moving apart. Bone fragment in sedimentary matrix. The picture above seem to show sedimentary mud that would have squeezed in fractures of this volcanic rock, creating the look that we're seeing here. If I remember right, magma would have solidified (could have been underwater), and at a later period silt like mud would have made its way, filling any cavity it could propagate into. The green algae show the level of the tides. Bone fragment in Triassic age rock. In the background you have your greyish volcanic rock. In the foreground you have a mix of wind blown reddish sandstone to other types found in aquatic environment. This is the start of what they call Wasson Bluff, famous site of the many dinosaur bones, some deemed at least the oldest in Canada. The sandstone that bear the multitude of bone fragments are usually the ones that show clastic basalt, as they usually indicate some type of aquatic environment, like watering holes. From what I can remember this would have been a valley where animals would make their way. Several events happened to have retained the animals where they are, to later be unearthed by scientists. Such remains are displayed at the FGM for people to view. The Triassic rock shows cavities where animal specimens had been found and unearthed. The cliff face changes all the time, so there is always a chance to find something. What I found fascinating is that we have this type of site in our own backyard, at our doorstep. There is always that awe factor where you're thinking, some of the oldest animals have walked where you have walked. The features you can find in the earth, the traces of animals long gone, the pieces of a puzzle that help define the history of not just the locality, but the global picture of how things were at one point in time. I have enjoyed Parrsboro and I'm convinced that anybody that goes there would enjoy it. Cheers!
  6. Continued from Part 1 These sandstone cliffs show remarkable details. The right section of the picture above show ripples close together, and the left section show what looks like dried up mud. For me this looks like what could have been a body that had dried up either in a warm and dry climate or a body of water where its water level was getting low. You will sometime find trace fossils on these features, as we did that day. Ken inspecting some trace fossils Fist sized animal foot prints (middle in an 'S' shape) We almost ran by these as we didn't notice them at first. Somebody spotted the tiny holes and then when our eyes adjusted, we could make out the fine toe prints of an animal that left its mark, strutting its stuff in the mud (line running in middle, showing as black dots). Close up of trace fossils showing as black dots, and a fist size impression in the mud (lower right) Better close up of individual track(s) Pair of foot prints in mudstone Ken is pointing to a set of fossils that are going from bottom right close to where he is pointing his stick to the upper left. It was extremely hard to make them out at this angle, and the camera didn't help with picking up the details. I will have to probably invest in a camera that has a good zoom and deep macro depth. Another angle (again hard to spot) Foot print? Another set of foot prints located at top left Multiple set of footprints More footprints (can you spot them?) Ken had found these bizarre indentations beside what to be an animal dragging its body or part of its body. What was intriguing was that these indentations were on both sides of the drag mark and in equal distance on each side (top of Ken's head, on both sides of drag mark). Below Ken's hand is a fist sized foot print probably made by the same animal. Another set of indentations close to the edge One theory is that an animal was moving in a shallow body of water, dragging its body on the sand, possibly paddling with its front legs and digging its hind legs in the sandy floor to move forward. I imagine an animal that could have longer rear legs, using them to propel itself forward casually in the water. It doesn't answer why there is another set of indentations by itself but the sandstone slab is cut off, creating more questions than answers. These rock formations show signs of extreme force, showing beautiful folding of strata that show like an accordion. Multiple 'S' patterns showing the direction of the fold. Limestone containing shells The crows and seagulls were getting agitated and pretty vocal at one point and somebody pointed out to a tall tree on top of the cliffs. Perched on that tree was this handsome bald eagle looking around. I had seen one earlier in a park about 10 minutes drive out of Parrsboro going towards Moncton, but I didn't have the chance to take a picture of it. There are quite a few type of eagles in the area from what I'm told. Eagle taking off Usually when I come to Parrsboro and find trace fossils, they're usually of the Triassic age from the early dinosaurs and reptiles like ancient crocodiles. What is nice about these sandstone cliffs is that they are from the Pennsylvanian (lower) Carboniferous Period, at about 320 to 280 million years (probably closer to 300 to 280 million years). The sheer number of them is intriguing and exciting. I've seen these before at the Brule museum in Tetamagouche, Nova Scotia, at the Cremerie. Next time I come here I'll have to venture to Partridge Island and see if I can find anything. Till next time!
  7. [Taken from my blog July 2011 - http://redleafz.blogspot.ca] This afternoon I was able to attend another curatorial walk organized by the Fundy Geological Museum (FGM)about the geological features of Partridge Island, which is about a 15 minutes drive from Parrsboro. We left the FGM at about 1pm and arrived at the beach not long after. The tides were just starting to get low so Ken Adams (the interpretor and FGM's curator) took the time to explain the various geological puzzle pieces that make up this area. With our group was a woman that took video and audio of this tour to include in a bid to have the Bay of Fundy recognized as one of the world's new wonders of the world (currently the only Canadian site in the contest, #14 if I recall). Here's a short description of the curatorial tour from the FGM website: The rocks of East Bay-Partridge Island present a cross section through Parrsboro's geologic past. They tell of the warm tropical seas, shallow lakes and coal swamps that existed during the formation of Pangea, and the desert sands and volcanic flows deposited at the beginning of the age of dinosaurs. - FGM Curatorial Walks Partridge Island located south of Parrsboro, Nova Scotia As I mentioned before, its about a 15 minutes drive from Parrsboro to Partridge Island's beach access. Down Whitehall Road you'll see the Ottawa House. There's a small dirt road called Partridge Island Road. Its a little tricky when you end up driving on the land that attaches the island to the mainland. Most of the time, you could call Partridge Island a 'presqu’île', or peninsula, which is a piece of land bordered by water on 3 sides, but with one remaining side connected to the mainland. I say this as even at high tide, the island is still showing attached to the mainland. Its only at high tide with its peak reached at the highest point of a lunar cycle that the island becomes a true island. Cape Sharp (middle) and Cape Split (left, in the distance) Partridge Island at high tide This place is just fantastic. It was cooler by the beach compared to being in town. We could hear the calls of the loon, and other local birds cowering, looking for the whereabouts of the bald eagles nesting in the cliffs. Close up of Cape Split Ken (left), Matt (middle) and Scott (right) Partridge Island Looking at the island you can make out two types of formations. You have your reddish Triassic age sedimentary rock that's slightly tilted, and the darker volcanic basalt (same as what you'd see at Five Island Park) which overlaps the Triassic rock. The volcanic rock shows columnar features as well as layering of multiple lava flows on top of each other. We didn't go to the island but I will at another time to look around for fossils and minerals. Lava flows Bryzoa The lines, or striation, on this outcrop were created when ancient glaciers were moving, scaring the rock and leaving these marks. You can tell the direction the glaciers were moving (growing or retreating). With striation and glacial till, this provides some evidence that glaciers made their way further down the northern hemisphere (possibly almost a few longitudinal degrees of the equator during the Precambrian). Close up of perpendicular striation Partridge Island (left) and Cape Blomidon (right) View of Partridge Island from East Bay These layers, or strata, of sandstone contain quite an amount of fossils, mostly clams. These cliffs show layers over layers of sedimentary sands and mud featuring mud cracks and ripples. As you'll see further in this article, we'll encounter some animal footprints (probably from early amphibian animals as these rocks date from anywhere between 320 to 280 millions years ago). Some rock outcrops we encountered along our walk showed the forces at work in the region as various faults show up, demonstrating how the continents were moving. Clams in mud stone and shale On to Part 2!
  8. 'Dawning of the Dinosaurs', by Harry Thurston, came out in the mid-90s and highlights the discoveries made in the Parrsboro region, where Canada's oldest dinosaurs were found at Wassons Bluff. Amidst the many volcanic basalt, there are these red sandstone cliffs that contain buried treasures from the Triassic. Parrsboro was also the location where the world's smallest dinosaur footprints were found by Eldon George in the mid-80s. What is also fascinating about the dinosaur skeletons are the state they are in: many have been fracture by faulting, giving them the name 'quake dinos'. Other animals of interest were some of the biggest crocodiles that ever lived! The research is still ongoing at Wassons Bluff and still yield many interesting specimens. http://www.nimbus.ca/
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