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Found 26 results

  1. Quaternary mammal fossil?

    I found this bone in Interior Alaska down river of some bluffs that I know have produced mammoth bones and other Pleistocene age fossils. I am curious if anybody can identify this bone and whether it is really from the quaternary or is it more recent. There is crystallization in the holes in the bone and it feels more dense than a normal bone would. Be thankful for any thoughts and information.
  2. Dugong & ?

    Its been awhile. Ran over to the big sand pit for a few the other day and came up with these certs and one other. Fell from on high so really tough to see what layer they came from.
  3. Climatic and eustatic signals in a global compilation of shallow marine carbonate accumulation rates DAVID B. KEMP and PETER M. SADLER Sedimentology (2014) 61, 1286–1297 pdfwil.pdf recommended,but having some background in /insight into modern stratigraphical and carbonate platform-sedimentological thinking is definitely helpful
  4. I went to a construction site near a big lake (Dian lake 滇池) at Kunming, China (Although this city is famous for Cambrian fossil) This place is going to construct some apartments. A lot of workers pass by without realizing they are trace fossil. it's geological map is: from https://www.osgeo.cn/map/m02db the location is around: from IOS's map So it suppose be from Quaternary, right? (but I am not sure if lake trace fossil can produce trace fossil like below) And I found some trace fossil: and some other stuff i am not so sure: and last picture is ripple mark If it is from the lake, that would be a nice vacation place in summer!
  5. Please help ID this little guy

    Hello folks. I'm back after an extended break. I've found some really cool fossils on my land in southern Missouri, Texas county, USA. Just a few miles south of cabool. A seasonal stream flows through my land exposing some cool finds, not to mention- the heavy rains are washing the topsoil away. From the hundreds of artifacts I've collected, this spot must have been an indigenous settlement. My best guess is that this item was in the hands of those early Americans. I can see why, this is my 2nd most favorite of the collection. Please help me identify what this is. Any help would be greatly appreciated. FYI, I have overcast skies at the moment and very limited internet access. These pics are the best I can do. Mm measurements are roughly 66mm x 38mm x 25mm
  6. Get Lost in Mega-Tunnels Dug by South American Megafauna By Andrew Jenner, March 28, 2017 https://www.discovermagazine.com/planet-earth/get-lost-in-mega-tunnels-dug-by-south-american-megafauna This Massive Tunnel in South America Was Dug by Ancient Mega-Sloths, BEC Crew, Science alerts, April 1, 2017 https://www.sciencealert.com/this-massive-tunnel-in-south-america-was-dug-by-ancient-mega-sloths Some online PDFs of papers are: Frank, H.T., Buchmann, F.S.C., Lima, L.G., Fornari, M., Caron, F. and Lopes, R.P., 2012. Cenozoic vertebrate tunnels in southern Brazil. Ichnology of Latin America: selected papers, 2, pp.141-158. http://www.ufrgs.br/paleotocas/Frank_et_al_2012.pdf Frank, H.T., Althaus, C.E., Dario, E.M., Tramontina, F.R., Adriano, R.M., Almeida, M.D.L., Ferreira, G.F., Nogueira, R. and Breier, R., 2017. Underground chamber systems excavated by Cenozoic ground sloths in the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia, 18(2), pp.273-284. http://www.ppegeo.igc.usp.br/index.php/rbp/article/download/10000/9330 http://www.ppegeo.igc.usp.br/index.php/rbp/article/view/10000 Lopes, R.P., Frank, H.T., Buchmann, F.S.D.C. and Caron, F., 2017. Megaichnus igen. nov.: giant paleoburrows attributed to extinct Cenozoic mammals from South America. Ichnos, 24(2), pp.133-145. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308171281_Megaichnus_igen_nov_Giant_Paleoburrows_Attributed_to_Extinct_Cenozoic_Mammals_from_South_America https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Francisco_Buchmann Buchmann, F.S. Frank, H.T., Ferreira, G.F., and Cruz, E.A., 2016, Evidência de vida gregária em paleotocas atribuídas a mylodontidae (preguiças- gigantes). Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia. v. 19 (2). pp. 259-270 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/307526053_Evidencia_de_vida_gregaria_em_paleotocas_atribuidas_a_Mylodontidae_preguicas-gigantes https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Francisco_Buchmann Frank, H.T., Lima, L.G., Gerhard, N.P., Caron, F., Buchmann, F.S.C., Fornari, M. and Lopes, R.P., 2013. Description and interpretation of Cenozoic vertebrate ichnofossils in Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. Revista Brasileira de Paleontologia, 16(1), pp.83-96. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273975528_Description_and_interpretation_of_Cenozoic_vertebrate_ichnofossils_in_Rio_Grande_do_Sul_State_Brazil https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Francisco_Buchmann Yours, Paul H.
  7. Hello, I recently found these three items in Custer County Oklahoma where Quaternary mixed with Permian and Cretaceous bedrock can be found. They were all found about 5 feet from each other with items one and two on top of each other. When I hold them they remind me of a terracotta pot in texture and kind of sound like terracotta when you tap on them. I am guessing they are fossilized bone? If it is bone I would love to figure out what it came from but understand that determining exactly what it was from may be difficult. I appreciate any input on what they could be and would also understand if its too difficult to determine. Below is item one, kind of flat.. Maybe a Skull?
  8. fossil toe or rock

    I found this on a gravel bar last weekend. it appears to be a carpal/tarsal bone. it may just be a pseudo fossil. it feels fully fossilized not just old bone. I was hoping to get a better handle on what I have. if it is a fossil it either came from Pennsylvanian age rocks or quaternary river gravel, no Mesozoic rocks around here.
  9. Can you ID this one?

    Hello again friends. I've found this while hiking at about 1800 m. a.s.l. in Santiago-Pontones (Jaen, Spain), in a place which I believe is quaternary. I've not been able to find it in the local literature. Now I only have this picture (I have more but they are dark and not useful), the rock is limestone and is wet, the fossil is conic, I'll post more pictures if necessary. The ruler is in cm. Thank you.
  10. Hi all, I found this leaf imprint in a fossil travertine formation at edge of central desert of Iran. It belongs to a broadleaf species. Do you have any idea of its species? Any help you can give me would be appreciated!
  11. Artic hyenas?

    Interesting article on a fossil tooth that his been "buried" in a museum vault for years. It was recently identified as a type of hyena that may have roamed the Arctic Circle. NYT subscribers, or those who haven't gone over a free limit, should be able to read. Cheers. Arctic hyena tooth fossil
  12. Equus teeth

    This is unusual for the areas I search. Usually Equus and other teeth being float fossils are one at a time singular finds. This trip I found a piece of matrix with two Equus teeth embedded in it with an outline of a missing third tooth in the clump. One upper and one lower tooth are embedded in the matrix very close to each other....unusual. The matrix itself is a puzzle....the color and texture are unusual for the area....stood out like a sore thumb. Matrix reminds me of the type you'd find cemented around bottles and garbage in a century old landfill. I always enjoy finding horse teeth....and this time its the unusual matrix as well as the number of teeth together that makes the find all that more enjoyable.
  13. Last week I was on holiday in the Netherlands and found some nice things, especially shark teeth ! I was at the area of Antwerp, in Cadzand, in Vlissingen and at the Zandmotor near Den Haag. In this topic I want to show my finds from my visit at the Zandmotor. The Zandmotor is artificial peninsula, constructed as part of the Dutch coastal defense system. The sand originates from about 10 kilometers offshore, and contains bones of various land mammals from the Quaternary period. On my visit I found some bone fragments, two shark teeth and some more things .... Here are two pictures of the found location: Firstly I want to show my best bone from there. Its an 4 cm long Phalanx and I have no idea from which animal it comes from. I hoped that I would find some more bones and maybe even a mammal tooth but maybe next time Then secondly I was very happy about my two shark teeth I found because they seem to be very rare there. Although they are quite worn The first one is 3 cm long: And the second one is 2 cm long and damaged on the other side: Another very common find there are fish vertebrae. The ones I found: They are not big (the biggest one is 2.5 cm long) Furthermore I found a beautiful tooth plate (?) of a fish: (3.6 cm long) And last but not least two Pectenids: Some more reports will follow (maybe in other threads...) Hope you enjoyed my pictures and thanks for viewing !!!
  14. QUAT glacai The Scheldt estuary trawl crowd might find this useful,perhaps About 5-10 mB each,source: JGSL,jan 2018 issue
  15. Pollen Weighs in on a Climate Conundrum

    Shakum, J. D., 2018. Pollen weighs in on a climate conundrum Science News and Views, Paleoclimate, January 31, 2018 https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-00943-4 "Simulations by climate models show that Earth warmed during the Holocene epoch, whereas ocean sedimentary cores suggest that global cooling occurred. An analysis of fossil pollen samples now sides with the models." Jeremiah Marsicek, Bryan N. Shuman, Patrick J. Bartlein, Sarah L. Shafer & Simon Brewer, 2018, Reconciling divergent trends and millennial variations in Holocene temperatures. Nature. 554, pages 92–96 doi:10.1038/nature25464 https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25464 Yours, Paul H.
  16. The stratigraphic nomenclature for Kansas has been formally revised. The result is lots of changes to the nomenclature made to acknowledge serious problems with five stage glacial model. Layzell, A.L., Sawin, R. S., Mandel, R. D., Ludvigson, G. A., Franseen, E. K., West, R. R., and Watney, W. L., 2017, Quaternary Stratigraphy and Stratigraphic Nomenclature Revisions in Kansas; in, Current Research in Earth Sciences: Kansas Geological Survey, Bulletin 263, 6 p. http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/2017/Layzell/index.html http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/2017/Layzell/Bulletin263.pdf http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Current/contents.html https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Greg_Ludvigson Yours, Paul H.
  17. Yellowstone spawned twin super-eruptions that altered global climate, Geological Society of America, October 26, 2017 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171026085804.htm http://www.geosociety.org/GSA/News/Releases/GSA/News/pr/2017/17-60.aspx Santa Barbara Basin Sediment Record of Volcanic Winters Triggered by Two Yellowstone Supervolcano Eruptions at 639 ka https://gsa.confex.com/gsa/2017AM/webprogram/Paper306169.html Yours, Paul H.
  18. Hi folks, My area in eastern WV is primarily devonian but the map shows some areas along the river as quaternary. The next time I go there, I plan to investigate some of the high banks, small cliffs and generally keep an eye peeled for anything out of the ordinary. What, if anything could I expect to find in this area ? Just wondering what features to focus on and what might be there ....... if anything. Thanks for any guidance.
  19. no sweat?

    reptegume2.43270.66.pdf Once again a note on my posting: yes I deliberately did NOT use a certain word
  20. After some research on the geological structure of my home state - West Virginia, It has come to my attention that what I once thought to be a land barren of fossils is actually very large plethora of different age rocks being oldest - extreme east, and newest rocks - to the west. But something odd turned up on some of the maps and papers in my scavenging through records of professors in paleontology or geological surveys: Quaternary rocks are riddled all throughout the state, almost as if a large region was once covered but now is reduced and weathered away into small outcrops in random places. I have known for a long time that the state fossil, Megalonyx Jeffersoni, is from the obvious newer rocks. However, the discovery of this skeleton was not dug up but rather found in a sealed cave away from the forces of nature. If I were to visit an area where these rocks are present, could I expect any turn-ups or just expect to find rocks that are of the age but contain absolutely nothing. Cenozoic fauna are definitely not my specialty (far from it, Cambrian) but I'd be willing to check it out after some research by me and input from others. PS, I certainly do not expect to go to an area like this and find fossil of a mammoth or saber-toothed tiger or any such animal (<-- I believe these aren't native to the area), but even the impression of anything could lead me on a journey that, again, I'd be willing to take. Here's the photo that is the reason I am typing this right now-
  21. Florida paleontology and paleoecology

    SOME OF YOU MIGHT LIKE THIS
  22. Both specimens were collected in the late 1950's by Otto Geist, with very little locality information. The links take you to the ARCTOS database pages about the specimens, with collection info and high quality pictures. This one was collected near Ruby, Alaska. My initial thought was that it is a horn pedicle of some sort but I would expect to see some brain case, and I don't. A previous identifier called it a Moose antler tine, but after some comparison I have trouble seeing antler tine. http://arctos.database.museum/guid/UAM:ES:3616 The vertebra was collected on the Koyuk River, Seward Peninsula, Alaska formerly part of the "Bering Land Bridge." There's little collection information but someone has assumed that it is Quaternary and mammalian. http://arctos.database.museum/guid/UAM:ES:26432 Thanks for looking, Alex
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